COMMAND DESCRIPTION     24/190 82-CRA 119 1170/1-V1 Uen A    

Commands: show r through show z

© Copyright Ericsson AB 2009. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer

No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner. The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List

SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson.

Contents

1Command Descriptions
1.1show radius control
1.2show radius counters
1.3show radius server
1.4show radius statistics
1.5show rate-limit card
1.6show rcm
1.7show redundancy
1.8show release
1.9show rip debug
1.10show rip instance
1.11show rip interface
1.12show ripng
1.13show rip route
1.14show rmon
1.15show route-map
1.16show rsvp counters
1.17show rsvp debug
1.18show rsvp explicit-route
1.19show rsvp interface
1.20show rsvp lsp
1.21show rsvp neighbor
1.22show rsvp track
1.23show secured-arp
1.24show service
1.25show snmp
1.26show snmp alarm
1.27show snmp ping
1.28show spanning-tree
1.29show spanning-tree circuit
1.30show sse
1.31show sse counters
1.32show ssh-attributes
1.33show static route
1.34show subscribers
1.35show system alarm
1.36show system nvlog
1.37show tacacs+ server
1.38show tcp
1.39show tech-support
1.40show terminal
1.41show transaction
1.42show tunnel
1.43show tunnel client
1.44show udp
1.45show version
1.46show vpls
1.47show vpls peer
1.48show vpls profile
1.49show vrrp
1.50show xc l2vpn


1   Command Descriptions

Commands starting with “show r” through commands starting with “show z” are included.

1.1   show radius control

show radius control

1.1.1   Purpose

Displays Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) server control information.

1.1.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.1.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.1.4   Default

None

1.1.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show radius control command to display RADIUS server control information.

Table 1 describes the information displayed in the output of the show radius control command. The display represents a snapshot of the current status of the message processing being handled by the RADIUS server or servers.

Table 1    Field Descriptions for the show radius control Command

Field

Description

Number of servers

Total number of RADIUS servers in the context or contexts

Total slots

Total number of possible outstanding requests for all servers in the context or contexts

Total in waiting queue

Number of requests waiting to be processed for all servers in the context or contexts

Total in process queue

Number of requests currently being processed for all servers in the context or contexts

Server status

Full = no more requests can be handled

OK = not full

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.1.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show radius control command:

[local]Redback>show radius control



=========================================================

Context Name: local

---------------------------------------------------------

                         Authentication       Accounting

Number of server:        3                    3

Total slots:             256                  256

Total in waiting queue:  1416                 0

Total in process queue:  200                  0

Server status:           OK                   Ok

1.2   show radius counters

show radius counters

1.2.1   Purpose

Displays counters for Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) access, accounting, and Change of Authorization (CoA) messages.

1.2.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.2.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.2.4   Default

None

1.2.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show radius counters command to display RADIUS access and accounting message counters. If the RADIUS server is configured as a CoA server, this command also displays CoA server counters.

Table 2 describes the counters that are displayed in the output of the show radius counters command.

Table 2    Field Descriptions for the show radius counters Command

Field

Description

Access Messages

Requests sent

Number of access request messages sent

Requests retried

Number of access request retry messages sent

Requests send fail

Number of access request messages that were sent and failed

Requests timeout

Number of access request messages that timed out

Responses drop

Number of access request messages that were dropped

Accepts received

Number of access accept messages received

Rejects received

Number of access reject messages received

Accounting Messages

Requests sent

Number of accounting request messages sent

Requests retry

Number of accounting request retry messages sent

Requests send fail

Number of accounting request messages that were sent and failed

Requests timeout

Number of accounting request messages that timed out

Responses drop

Number of accounting request messages that were dropped

Responses received

Number of accounting request message responses received

CoA Messages

Requests received

Number of CoA and disconnect request messages received

Duplicate request

Number of duplicate CoA and disconnect request messages received

Response ACK

Number of CoA and disconnect requests that were successful

Response NAK

Number of CoA and disconnect requests that were unsuccessful

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.2.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show radius counters command:

[local]Redback>show radius counters



=============================================================================

Server: 10.13.130.75      Port:  1812 Counter start time: May 23 17:55:30 2006

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Access Messages:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Requests sent:            0

  Requests retried:         0

  Requests send fail:       0

  Requests timeout:         0

  Responses dropped:        0

  Accepts received:         0

  Rejects received:         0



=============================================================================

Server: 10.13.130.75    Port: 1813  Counter start time: May 22 23:41:09 2006

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Accounting Messages:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Requests sent:            356

  Requests retried:         1

  Requests send fail:       0

  Requests timeout:         0

  Responses dropped:        0

  Accepts received:         357

  Rejects received:         0



=============================================================================

Server:  10.13.130.75     Port: 3799  Counter start time: May 22 23:52:35 2006

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  CoA Messages:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Requests received:        12

  Duplicate request:        0

  Response ACK:             6

  Response NAK:             6

1.3   show radius server

show radius server

1.3.1   Purpose

Displays Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) server configuration and status information.

1.3.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.3.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.3.4   Default

None

1.3.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show radius server command to display RADIUS server configuration and status information. If the RADIUS server is configured as a Change of Authorization (CoA) server, this command also displays CoA server information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.3.6   Examples

The following example displays RADIUS server configuration information and status:

[local]Redback>show radius server
Accounting Server

==============================================================================

  Address       Port      Key            State       State set time

==============================================================================

10.20.1.1       1813     ********        Alive    Thu May 11 17:26:05 2006



Algorithm:                first

Timeout (in sec.):        10

Max retry:                3

Max outstanding:          256

Server timeout (in sec.): 60

Deadtime (in min.):       5





CoA Server

==============================================================================

  Address       Port      Key            State       State set time

==============================================================================

10.20.1.1       3000     ********        Alive    Thu May 11 17:31:15 2006

1.4   show radius statistics

show radius statistics

1.4.1   Purpose

Displays Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) server statistics.

1.4.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.4.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.4.4   Default

None

1.4.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show radius statistics command to display RADIUS server statistics.

Table 3 describes the counters that are displayed in the output of the show radius statistics command.

Table 3    Field Descriptions for the show radius statistics Command

Field

Description

Authentication Servers

 

Requests send

Number of access request messages sent.

Requests re-send

Number of access-requests sent more than one time by the SmartEdge® router to the RADIUS servers (NetOp PM) because the timeout set (command radius timeout) in the configuration is over

Requests timeout

Number of access request messages that timed out

Requests send fail

Number of access request messages that were sent and failed

Requests accepted

Number of access-accepts received by the SmartEdge router from the RADIUS servers (NetOp PM)

Requests rejected

Number of access-rejects received by the SmartEdge router from the RADIUS servers (NetOp PM)

Response dropped

Number of access request messages that were dropped

Req in process

Total number of access-requests outstanding from the SmartEdge router.

Req in waiting

Number of subscribers waiting for an available slot to send the access-request to the RADIUS servers.

Req in high wait queue

 

Req in low wait queue

 

Server slots

Total number of simultaneous access-requests that can out stand from the SmartEdge router.

Capacity

Percentage of server slots currently in use.

Server marked dead

Number of RADIUS servers known as dead at the moment the show command was typed.

Accounting Servers

 

Requests send

Number of access request messages sent.

Requests re-send

Number of access-requests sent more than one time by the SmartEdge router to the RADIUS servers (NetOp PM) because the timeout set (command radius timeout) in the configuration is over

Requests timeout

Number of access request messages that timed out

Requests send fail

Number of access request messages that were sent and failed

Requests accepted

Number of access-accepts received by the SmartEdge router from the RADIUS servers (NetOp PM)

Requests rejected

Number of access-rejects received by the SmartEdge router from the RADIUS servers (NetOp PM)

Response dropped

Number of access request messages that were dropped

Req in process

Total number of access-requests outstanding from the SmartEdge router.

Req in waiting

Number of subscribers waiting for an available slot to send the access-request to the RADIUS servers.

Req in high wait queue

 

Req in low wait queue

 

Server slots

Total number of simultaneous access-requests that can out stand from the SmartEdge router.

Capacity

Percentage of server slots currently in use.

Server marked dead

Number of RADIUS servers known as dead at the moment the show command was typed.

CoA Servers

 

Requests received

 

Duplicate requests

 

Response ACK

 

Response NAK

 

Send details

 

Subscriber authentication

 

Request send

 

Request retransmit

 

Response received

 

Server busy

 

Server not ready

 

No server

 

Server marked dead

 

Bad attribute

 

Socket error

 

Send accept to AAAd

 

Send reject to AAAd

 

Send meth fail to AAAd

 

Internal error

 

Unknown attribute

 

Authorization

 

Request send

 

Request retransmit

 

Response received

 

Server busy

 

Server not ready

 

No server

 

Server marked dead

 

Bad attribute

 

Socket error

 

Send accept to AAAd

 

Send reject to AAAd

 

Send meth fail to AAAd

 

Internal error

 

Unknown attribute

 

Subscriber accounting

 

Request send

 

Request retransmit

 

Response received

 

Server busy

 

Server not ready

 

No server

 

Server marked dead

 

Bad attribute

 

Socket error

 

Accounting accepted

 

Accounting timeout

 

Internal error

 

Unknown attribute

 

L2tp accounting

 

Request send

 

Request retransmit

 

Response received

 

Server busy

 

Server not ready

 

No server

 

Server marked dead

 

Bad attribute

 

Socket error

 

Accounting accepted

 

Accounting timeout

 

Internal error

 

Unknown attribute

 

Accounting On/Off

 

Request send

 

Request retransmit

 

Response received

 

Server busy

 

Server not ready

 

No server

 

Server marked dead

 

Bad attribute

 

Socket error

 

Accounting accepted

 

Accounting timeout

 

Internal error

 

Unknown attribute

 

Event accounting

 

Request send

 

Request retransmit

 

Response received

 

Server busy

 

Server not ready

 

No server

 

Server marked dead

 

Bad attribute

 

Socket error

 

Accounting accepted

 

Accounting timeout

 

Internal error

 

Unknown attribute

 

Receive Details

 

No match request

 

No match server

 

Invalid packet

 

Bogus packet

 

Dup response packet

 
Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.4.6   Examples

The following example displays RADIUS statistics:

[local]Redback>show radius statistics



Context: local 

Authentication Servers:

Requests send:             0                 Requests re-send:      0

Request timeout:           0                 Requests send fail:    0

Requests accepted:         0                 Requests rejected:     0

Requests timeout:          0                 Response dropped:      0

Req in process:            0                 Req in waiting:        0

Req in high wait queue:    0                 Req in low wait queue: 0

Server slots 0 Capacity:   0%

Server marked dead:        0

Accounting Servers:



Requests send:             2                 Requests re-send:      1

Request timeout:           0                 Requests send fail:    1

Requests accepted:         2                 Requests rejected:     0

Requests timeout:          0                 Response dropped:      0

Req in process:            0                 Req in waiting:        0

Req in high wait queue:    0                 Req in low wait queue: 0

Server slots:              256               Capacity:              0%

Server marked dead:        0



Send Details:



Subscriber authentication:



Request send:              0                 Request retransmit:    0

Response received:         0

Server busy:               0                 Server not ready:      0

No server:                 0                 Server marked dead:    0

Bad attribute:             0                 Socket error:          0

Send accept to AAAd:       0                 Send reject to AAAd:   0

Send meth fail to AAAd:    0                 Internal error:        0



Authorization:



Request send:              0                 Request retransmit:    0

Response received:         0

Server busy:               0                 Server not ready:      0

No server:                 0                 Server marked dead:    0

Bad attribute:             0                 Socket error:          0

Send accept to AAAd:       0                 Send reject to AAAd:   0

Send meth fail to AAAd:    0                 Internal error:        0



Subscriber session accounting:



Request send:              2                 Request retransmit:    1

Response received:         2

Server busy:               0                 Server not ready:      0

No server:                 0                 Server marked dead:    0

Bad attribute:             0                 Socket error:          0

Send accept to AAAd:       1                 Send reject to AAAd:   0

Send meth fail to AAAd:    0                 Internal error:        0



L2tp accounting:



Request send:              0                 Request retransmit:    0

Response received:         0

Server busy:               0                 Server not ready:      0

No server:                 0                 Server marked dead:    0

Bad attribute:             0                 Socket error:          0

Send accept to AAAd:       0                 Send reject to AAAd:   0

Send meth fail to AAAd:    0                 Internal error:        0



Accounting On/Off:



Request send:              0                 Request retransmit:    0

Response received:         0

Server busy:               0                 Server not ready:      0

No server:                 0                 Server marked dead:    0

Bad attribute:             0                 Socket error:          0

Send meth fail to AAAd:    0                 Internal error:        0



Event accounting:



Request send:              0                 Request retransmit:    0

Response received:         0

Server busy:               0                 Server not ready:      0

No server:                 0                 Server marked dead:    0

Bad attribute:             0                 Socket error:          0

Send accept to AAAd:       0                 Send reject to AAAd:   0

Send meth fail to AAAd:    0                 Internal error:        0



Receive Details:



No match request:          0                 No match server:       0

Invalid packet:            0                 Bogus packet:          0

1.5   show rate-limit card

show rate-limit card {all | slot} dhcp {counter | log}

1.5.1   Purpose

Displays dropped Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) packet information for one or more traffic cards.

1.5.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.5.3   Syntax Description

all

Displays DHCP packet information for all traffic cards.

slot

Slot number of a specific traffic card.

counter

Displays the count of dropped DHCP packets for one or all traffic cards.

log

Displays the log messages for dropped DHCP packets for one or all traffic cards.

1.5.4   Default

None

1.5.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rate-limit card command to display DHCP packet information for packets dropped because of rate limiting.

Use the counter keyword to display the count of dropped DHCP packets for one or all traffic cards.

Use the log keyword to display the log messages for dropped DHCP packets for one or all traffic cards.

Note:  
This command always displays a slot number unless no active traffic cards are present. If the resolution of the IP address is the Ethernet management port, the output might display a slot number.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.5.6   Examples

The following example displays the count of dropped DHCP packets for the traffic card in slot 1:

[local]Redback>show rate-limit card 1 dhcp counter

Slot 1 Ingress:

        card rate-limit 1060236 packets

The following example displays the log messages for the traffic card in slot 1:

[local]Redback>show rate-limit card 1 dhcp log



Slot 1 Ingress:

current index: 103

000  src-ip-addr 2.1.1.2    src-mac-addr 00 00 03 00 03 00   circuit 1/3:1023:63/1/1/5

001  src-ip-addr 2.1.1.2    src-mac-addr 00 00 03 00 03 00   circuit 1/3:1023:63/1/1/5

002  src-ip-addr 2.1.1.2    src-mac-addr 00 00 03 00 03 00   circuit 1/3:1023:63/1/1/5

003  src-ip-addr 2.1.1.2    src-mac-addr 00 00 03 00 03 00   circuit 1/3:1023:63/1/1/5

004  src-ip-addr 2.1.1.2    src-mac-addr 00 00 03 00 03 00   circuit 1/3:1023:63/1/1/5

005  src-ip-addr 2.1.1.2    src-mac-addr 00 00 03 00 03 00   circuit 1/3:1023:63/1/1/5

1.6   show rcm

show rcm {memory | session}

1.6.1   Purpose

Displays Router Configuration Manager (RCM) information.

1.6.2   Command Mode

all configuration modes

1.6.3   Syntax Description

memory

Displays RCM memory usage.

session

Displays RCM session information.

1.6.4   Default

None

1.6.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rcm command to display RCM information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.6.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show rcm command with the memory keyword:

[local]Redback>show rcm memory
Displaying memory usage by RCM:

  Internal chunk memory                      : 125200 bytes

  Dynamically memory allocated by all        : 13844 bytes

  Memory allocated for msg by RCM components : 0 bytes 

The following example displays output from the show rcm command with the session keyword:

[local]Redback>show rcm session
CLI pid      State                  Trans ID      Waiting on

-------------------------------------------------------------------

13117        Not in transaction     N/A           None

13059        Not in transaction     N/A           None

12610        In transaction         3062          None 

1.7   show redundancy

show redundancy

1.7.1   Purpose

Displays the state of the standby controller card and verifies whether it is ready to become active.

1.7.2   Command Mode

1.7.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.7.4   Default

None

1.7.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show redundancy command to display the state of the standby controller card and to verify whether it is ready to become active.

Note:  
The SmartEdge 100 router does not support this command; the chassis has only one controller carrier card.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.7.6   Examples

The following example displays the state of the controller cards:

[local]Redback>show redundancy 
--------------------------------- 

This XCRP is active 

--------------------------------- 

Firmware in sync? : YES 

Software Release in sync? : YES 

Database in sync? : YES 

Mate-to-Mate link up? : YES 

Standby Ready? : YES

1.8   show release

show release

1.8.1   Purpose

Displays release and installation information for the software images currently installed on the system.

1.8.2   Command Mode

1.8.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.8.4   Default

None

1.8.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show release command to display the release and installation information for the software images on the system and the partitions in which they are installed. The active image shows the software that is currently loaded in the system, and the alternate image shows the alternate image available on the system.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.8.6   Examples

The following example displays the release and installation information for the installed software images:

[local]Redback>show release
Installed releases:



p02: active (will be booted after next reload)

----------------------------------------------

Version SEOS-5.0.5-Release

Built on Mon Jan 02 10:00:01 PST 2006

Copyright (C) 1998-2006, Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

p01: alternate

--------------

Version SEOS-5.0.5-Release

Built on Mon Jan 16 10:00:01 PDT 2006

Copyright (C) 1998-2006, Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

1.9   show rip debug

show rip debug

1.9.1   Purpose

Displays enabled Routing Information Protocol (RIP) debug settings.

1.9.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.9.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.9.4   Default

None

1.9.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rip debug command to display enabled RIP debug settings.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.9.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show rip debug command:

[local]Redback>show rip debug
RIP debug flags: REQUEST_RECV REQUEST_SEND RESPONSE_RECV RESPONSE_SEND PACKET_GENERAL

RIP debug detail flags:

1.10   show rip instance

show rip instance [instance]

1.10.1   Purpose

Displays information for all Routing Information Protocol (RIP) instances, or only for a particular RIP instance.

1.10.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.10.3   Syntax Description

instance

Optional. RIP instance name.

1.10.4   Default

When entered without the optional instance argument, this command displays information for all configured RIP instances.

1.10.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rip instance command to display information for all RIP instances, or only for a particular RIP instance.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.10.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show rip instance command:

[local]Redback>show rip instance
Fl - Instance Flags: (O - Default information originate), P - Maximum paths

TH - Flash update threshold, DM - Default metric, Dis - Admin distance

Dl - Output delay, TableVer - Routing table version, Upd - Update

Inv - Invalid, Hld - Holddown, Flu - Flush, Expr - Next flashupdate

GblFlg - Global flags: (I - ISM up, P - RPM up, R-RIB up)



InstanceName         Fl P TH DM Dis Dl   TableVer Expr Upd/Inv/Hld/Flu GblFlg

area1                -  8  5  0 120  0          1    2  30 180 180 240    IPR

area2                -  8  5  0 120  0          1    2  30 180 180 240    IPR

1.11   show rip interface

show rip interface [instance]

1.11.1   Purpose

Displays information for all Routing Information Protocol (RIP) interfaces, or only for RIP interfaces within a particular RIP instance.

1.11.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.11.3   Syntax Description

instance

Optional. RIP instance name.

1.11.4   Default

When entered without the optional instance argument, this command displays information about all RIP interfaces.

1.11.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rip interface to display information for all RIP interfaces, or only for RIP interfaces within a particular RIP instance.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.11.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show rip interface command:

[local]Redback>show rip interface
Interface Flags: U - Up, B - Bound, L - Listen, S - Supply, A-Admin up

V - have Valid addr, R-Registered with ISM, O - Default information originate

N - No default info orig, H - split Horizon, P - Poison reverse, Upd - Update

Inv - Invalid, Hld - Holddown, FLu - Flush, Expr - Next full update, Co - Cost



Interfaces of RIP instance: area1

Name                   Addr/MaskLen State    Upd/Inv/Hld/Flu Expr Co IntfId

ripint1                 10.1.1.1/24 LSRVH     30 180 180 240   29  1 10000001

Total 1 interfaces, 0 are up.

1.12   show ripng

show ripng {all-instances | debug | instance [instance-id] | interface [if-name] | route [instance-id]}

1.12.1   Purpose

Displays Routing Information Protocol next generation (RIPng) information.

1.12.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.12.3   Syntax Description

all-instances

Displays information for all RIPng instances.

debug

Displays RIPng debug settings.

instance

Displays RIPng instance information.

instance-id

Optional. Instance ID. When specified, displays RIPng instance or RIPng route information for a specific RIPng instance.

interface

Displays RIPng interface information.

if-name

Optional. Interface name. When specified, displays information for a specific RIPng interface.

route

Displays RIPng route information.

1.12.4   Default

None

1.12.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ripng command to display RIPng information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.12.6   Examples

The following example displays information for all RIPng instances:

[local]Redback>show ripng all-instances



Fl - Flags: (O - Default information originate, M - Maximum routes reached)

P  - Maximum paths

TH - Flash update threshold, DM - Default metric, Dis - Admin distance

Dl - Output delay, TableVer - Routing table version, Upd - Update

Inv - Invalid, Hld - Holddown, Flu - Flush, Expr - Next flashupdate



InstanceName         Fl P TH DM Dis Dl   TableVer Expr Upd/Inv/Hld/Flu #Route

Context local:

1                    -  16  5  0 120  0          4    1  30 180 180 240      3

The following example displays the RIPng debug settings:

[local]Redback>show ripng debug



RIP debug flags: REQUEST_RECV REQUEST_SEND RESPONSE_RECV RESPONSE_SEND PACKET_GE

NERAL MEMORY INTERNAL PROTOCOL IPC TIMER INTERFACE LOCAL_RIB GLOBAL_RIB POLICY C

ONFIG IN_QUEUE OUT_QUEUE AUTHENTICATION THREAD SOCKIO ISM GENERAL

RIP debug detail flags: 

The following example displays information for the RIPng instance, 4:

[local]Redback>show ripng instance 4



Fl - Flags: (O - Default information originate, M - Maximum routes reached)

P  - Maximum paths

TH - Flash update threshold, DM - Default metric, Dis - Admin distance

Dl - Output delay, TableVer - Routing table version, Upd - Update

Inv - Invalid, Hld - Holddown, Flu - Flush, Expr - Next flashupdate



InstanceName         Fl P TH DM Dis Dl   TableVer Expr Upd/Inv/Hld/Flu #Route

Context local:

1                    -  16  5  0 120  0          4    3  30 180 180 240      3

The following example displays information for the RIPng interface, 88:

[local]Redback>show ripng interface 88



Interface Flags: U - Up, B - Bound, L - Listen, S - Supply, A-Admin up

V - have Valid addr, R-Registered with ISM, O - Default information originate

N - No default info orig, H - split Horizon, P - Poison reverse, Upd - Update

Inv - Invalid, Hld - Holddown, FLu - Flush, Expr - Next full update, Co - Cost



Interfaces of RIP instance: 1 

Name                   Addr/MaskLen State    Upd/Inv/Hld/Flu Expr Co IntfId

lo                       8001::1/128 ULVH      30 180 180 240   16  1 10000004

to-nbor                  7001::1/112 ULSVH     30 180 180 240   16  1 10000003

Total 2 interfaces, 2 are up.

The following example displays information for the RIPng route, 37:

[local]Redback>show ripng route 37



T - RouteType:(C - Connected, E - External, R - RIP, EB - External backup)

M - Metric, Exp - Expire time, PrFl - Prefix flags ( D - Delete, H - Holddown

A - Need flash, B - Need download to RIB, I - Inactive) NhFl - Next Hop Flags 

(W - Withdrawn from RIB, H - Holddown, F - Flush expire before holddown)



Routing table for RIP instance: 1                    

T Prefix/PrefixLen     NextHop                    M  Exp PrFl|NhFl Intf     Peer

C 7001::/112           ::                         0   -     6|6    to-nbor 

C 8001::1/128          ::                         0   -     6|6    lo      

R 8001::2/128          fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294   1  172    6|6    to-nbor 

Total 3 prefixes 3 routes(1 intern 0 extern 2 connected)

1.13   show rip route

show rip route [instance] [ip-addr/prefix-length [longer-prefixes]]

1.13.1   Purpose

Displays information about all Routing Information Protocol (RIP) routes, or only for routes within a particular RIP instance.

1.13.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.13.3   Syntax Description

instance

Optional. RIP instance name.

ip-addr/prefix-length

Optional. IP address (in the form A.B.C.D) and prefix length, separated by the slash (/) character. The range of values for the prefix-length argument is 0 to 32.

longer-prefixes

Optional. Displays all routes that fall into the range of the prefix; otherwise, only routes that exactly match are displayed.

1.13.4   Default

When entered without any optional arguments, this command displays information about all RIP routes.

1.13.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rip route command to display information about RIP routes, or only for routes within a particular RIP instance.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.13.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show rip route command:

[local]Redback>show rip route
T - RouteType: (C - Connected, E - External, R - RIP, EB - External backup)

M - Metric, Exp - Expire time, PrFl - Prefix flags D - Delete, H - Holddown

A - Need flash, B - Need download to RIB, I - Inactive) NhFl - Next Hop Flags

(W - Withdrawn from RIB, H - Holddown, F - Flush expire before holddown)



Routing table for RIP instance: rip001

T          Prefix     NextHop          M   Exp PrFl|NhFl Intf     Peer

Total 0 prefixes 0 routes (0 intern 0 extern 0 connected)

1.14   show rmon

show rmon {alarms | events}

1.14.1   Purpose

Displays Remote Monitoring (RMON) information.

1.14.2   Command Mode

1.14.3   Syntax Description

alarms

Displays RMON alarm records.

events

Displays RMON event records.

1.14.4   Default

None

1.14.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rmon command to display RMON information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.14.6   Examples

The following example displays RMON alarms:

[local]Redback>show rmon alarm
rmon alarm 5 ipInReceives.0 50 delta rising-threshold 5000 5 falling-threshold 200 6 owner "gold.isp.net" 

rmon alarm 10 ipForwDatagrams.0 60 delta rising-threshold 3000000 1 falling-threshold 600000 2 

rmon alarm 20 rbnCpuMeterOneMinuteAvg.0 5 absolute rising-threshold 50 3 falling-threshold 10 4 owner "alarmDel6" 

The following example displays RMON events:

[local]Redback>show rmon events
rmon event 1 log notify owner gold.isp.net description "packets per second too high in context gold.isp.net" 

rmon event 2 log notify owner gold.isp.net description "packets per second is below 10000 in context gold.isp.net" 

rmon event 3 log notify owner gold.isp.net description "One minute average CPU usage on the device is above 50%" 

rmon event 4 log notify owner gold.isp.net description "One minute average CPU usage on the device is now below 10%" 

rmon event 5 log notify owner gold.isp.net description "The total number of input IP datagrams received from interfaces per second is 100 and above" 

rmon event 6 log notify owner gold.isp.net description "The total number of input IP datagrams received from interfaces per second is 4 and below" 

1.15   show route-map

show route-map [map-name] [summary]

1.15.1   Purpose

Displays information about configured route maps.

1.15.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.15.3   Syntax Description

map-name

Optional. Name of the route map.

summary

Optional. Displays route map summary information.

1.15.4   Default

Displays all configured route maps.

1.15.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show route-map command to display information about configured route maps.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.15.6   Examples

The following example displays all configured route maps:

[local]Redback>show route-map
route-map c1-a2-in:

 count: 6, sequences: 10 - 40, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 21 hour(s) ago

 sequence 10, permit (hits: 13, cache hits: 7)

   Match clauses:

     as-path (as-path filter): AS2686

   Set clauses:

     local-preference 80

     weight 65535

 sequence 15, permit (hits: 17667, cache hits: 17667)

   Match clauses:

     ip address (prefix list): /22-permit

   Set clauses:

     community local-AS

 sequence 20, permit (hits: 2, cache hits: 0)

   Match clauses:

     ip address (prefix list): slash9

   Set clauses:

     metric 80

 sequence 25, permit (hits: 3, cache hits: 0)

   Match clauses:

     ip address (prefix list): slash18

   Set clauses:

     community-list no-export/11:121-delete delete

     community 11:102 additive

     ip next-hop 10.255.255.254

 sequence 30, permit (hits: 307062, cache hits: 0)

   Match clauses:

     community (community list filter): 11:121-c1-wtn

   Set clauses:

     community 11:102 additive

 sequence 40, permit (hits: 0, cache hits: 0)

   Match clauses:

   Set clauses:

route-map a2-out-map:

 count: 4, sequences: 10 - 40, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 21 hour(s) ago

 sequence 40, permit (hits: 2227, cache hits: 0)

   Match clauses:

     community (community list filter): a2community

   Set clauses:

     metric-type internal

total route maps: 2

The following command displays a summary of all configured route maps:

[local]Redback>show route-map summary
route-map c1-a2-in:

 count: 6, sequences: 10 - 40, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 21 hour(s) ago

route-map a2-out-map:

 count: 4, sequences: 10 - 40, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 21 hour(s) ago

total route maps: 2

1.16   show rsvp counters

show rsvp counters [global | lsp | packets]

1.16.1   Purpose

Displays Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) counter information.

1.16.2   Command Mode

1.16.3   Syntax Description

global

Optional. Displays only global counters.

lsp

Optional. Displays only label-switched path (LSP)-related counters.

packets

Optional. Displays only packet-related counters.

1.16.4   Default

Displays all RSVP counter information.

1.16.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp counters command to display RSVP counter information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.16.6   Examples

The following example displays packet-related output from the show rsvp counters command:

[local]Redback>show rsvp counters packets
                 --- Global RSVP Counters ---

         Packet Counters



            Interval:  00:00:09

        Packets Sent:         0        Packets Recvd:         0

  Packets Tx dropped:         0   Packets Rx dropped:         0

  Packets Tx IO errs:         0   Packets Rx IO errs:         0

           PATH Sent:         0           PATH Recvd:         0

           RESV Sent:         0           RESV Recvd:         0

      PATH TEAR Sent:         0      PATH TEAR Recvd:         0

      RESV TEAR Sent:         0      RESV TEAR Recvd:         0

       PATH ERR Sent:         0       PATH ERR Recvd:         0

       RESV ERR Sent:         0       RESV ERR Recvd:         0

        CONFIRM Sent:         0        CONFIRM Recvd:         0

  Unknown Pkts Recvd:         0

The following example displays LSP-related output from the show rsvp counters command:

[local]Redback>show rsvp counters lsp
                 --- Global RSVP Counters ---

         LSP Counters



      Total Sessions:        26           Total LSPs:         27

        Ingress LSPs:         7          Egress LSPs:         18

        Transit LSPs:         2          Backup LSPs:         1

             Up LSPs:        23            Down LSPs:         4

         Active LSPs:        23         Backup2 LSPs:         0

         Bypass LSPs:         0        Rerouted LSPs:         0

          Stale LSPs:         5 Stale LSPs Recovered:         5

In this example:

Stale LSPs = The number of LSPs that moved to the Stale state due to local or neighbor restart events.

Stale LSPs Recovered = The number of previously stale LSPs that moved back successfully to the Up state.

1.17   show rsvp debug

show rsvp debug

1.17.1   Purpose

Displays Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) debug information.

1.17.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.17.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.17.4   Default

None

1.17.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp debug command to display RSVP debug information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.17.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show rsvp debug command:

[local]Redback>show rsvp debug
Event                     Filter



Packet

Packet Send

Path Send

Path Recv

Resv Send

Resv Recv

Path Error Send

Path Error Recv

Resv Error Send

Resv Error Recv

Path Tear Send

Path Tear Recv

Packet Confirm Send

Packet Confirm Recv

Packet Recv

1.18   show rsvp explicit-route

show rsvp explicit-route [er-name] [detail]

1.18.1   Purpose

Displays explicit route information.

1.18.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.18.3   Syntax Description

er-name

Optional. Name of the explicit route for which information is displayed.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information for the specified explicit route or all explicit routes.

1.18.4   Default

Displays summary information for all explicit routes.

1.18.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp explicit-route command to display explicit route information.

Use the er-name argument to display detailed information for a specific explicit route.

Use the detail keyword to display the detailed explicit route information; otherwise, the summary information is displayed.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.18.6   Examples

The following example displays summary information for all explicit routes:

[local]Redback>show rsvp explicit-route



Explicit Route       Hop Count   

exp-rt1              2           

The following example displays detailed information for the exp-rt1 explicit route:

[local]Redback>show rsvp explicit-route exp-rt1



Explicit Route: exp-rt1              Hop Count: 2

  Length: 8 Addr: 10.1.1.1/32

  Length: 8 Addr: 10.2.1.2/32

1.19   show rsvp interface

show rsvp interface [if-name | detail]

1.19.1   Purpose

Displays Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) interface summary information.

1.19.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.19.3   Syntax Description

if-name

Optional. Name of the RSVP interface to be displayed.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.19.4   Default

Displays all RSVP interface summary information.

1.19.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp interface command to display all RSVP interface summary information.

Use the if-name argument to display information for only a specific RSVP interface.

Use the detail keyword to display detailed RSVP interface information; otherwise, summary information is displayed.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.19.6   Examples

The following example shows how to display information for all configured RSVP interfaces:

[local]Redback>show rsvp interface
         --- All RSVP Interfaces ---


Address/Mask       Name                 State  Bound to

1.1.1.1/24         one                  Up     7/4

3.1.1.1/24         two                  Up     7/2

The following example shows how to display information for the IPst.14 RSVP interface :

[local]router#show rsvp interface IPst.14

--- RSVP Interface 10.18.241.74 ---


Name : IPst.14               Mask : 255.255.255.252

State                  : Down        Bound to                 :

Refresh Interval (sec) : 30          Keep Multiplier          : 6

Hello Interval (sec)   : 0           Hello Keep Multiplier    : 3

Max Bandwidth (By/sec) : 0           TE metric : Use IGP metric

TE update threshold    : 5           TE advertisements        : 0

Tracking               : Enabled (tracking objects below)

Track-mtu

Allocated BW (By/sec)  : 0

Priority     Resv B/W (By/sec)      Last-Advertised   Available

0            0                      0                 0

1            0                      0                 0

2            0                      0                 0

3            0                      0                 0

4            0                      0                 0

5            0                      0                 0

6            0                      0                 0

7            0                      0                 0

1.20   show rsvp lsp

show rsvp lsp [up | down | label | protection | backup | bypass | protected | ingress | egress | transit | track ] [detail ] | lsp-name]

1.20.1   Purpose

Displays Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) label-switched path (LSP) information.

1.20.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.20.3   Syntax Description

up

Optional. Displays only up LSPs.

down

Optional. Displays only down LSPs.

label

Optional. Displays label information for RSVP LSPs.

protection

Optional. Displays only protection information.

backup

Optional. Displays only back-up LSPs.

bypass

Optional. Displays only bypass LSPs.

protected

Optional. Displays only protected LSPs with back-ups configured.

ingress

Optional. Displays only ingress LSPs.

egress

Optional. Displays only egress LSPs.

transit

Optional. Displays only transit LSPs.

track

Optional. Displays information about the tracking-enabled label-switched paths (LSPs) that are currently configured on your system.

Include the lsp-name argument after the track keyword to display tracking information for a specific LSP.

Include the detail keyword after the track keyword to display detailed tracking information for a specific LSP.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

lsp-name

Optional. Name of LSP for which information is displayed.

1.20.4   Default

Displays summary information for all LSPs.

1.20.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp lsp command to display all RSVP LSP information.

Use the lsp-name argument to display information only for the specified LSP, or use any of the available keywords to display LSP information only for the specified keyword.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

Note:  
When the output fills a width of 80 characters or more, the column headings and contents are truncated or abbreviated.

Note:  
This output fills a width of 80 characters, and that is why the column headings, as well the contents, have been truncated or abbreviated.

1.20.6   Examples

The following example displays information for all RSVP LSPs:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp
                 RSVP LSPs



LSP       ID   Ingress      Endpoint     State  FRR Origin   Protection

W-E-bkup  1    10.1.1.2     10.2.1.2     Up         Ingress  Backup

W-E-lsp   1    10.1.1.2     10.2.1.2     Shut       Ingress  Primary

E-W-lsp   2    10.2.1.2     10.1.1.2     Up         Egress   None

The show rsvp lsp command displays the following:

LSP = Name of the LSP. Each RSVP LSP has a specific name.

ID = Tunnel ID of the LSP (this ID is determined by the ingress node of the LSP).

Ingress = IP address of the ingress of the LSP. Usually, this address is the IP address of the router from which the packet got its LSP, but the ingress address is configurable for SE RSVP LSPs; so, it can also be a loopback address.

Endpoint = Destination address of the LSP. Usually, this address is the IP address of the destination router to which the packet has its last hop, but the address does not need to be the router ID of the destination router; it can be a loopback address configured at the destination router.

State = State of the LSP. The state can be Up, Down, Shut, or Stale.

FRR = If the LSP has an FRR bypass LSP that can protect it, then this field displays the tunnel ID of the bypass LSP that is protecting it. Otherwise, this field is empty.

0rigin = Origin, for the type of LSP relative to the location of the local switch in the path: I (or Ingress) for ingress, E (or Egress) for egress, or T (or Transit) for transit.

Protection = Protection characteristic of the LSP. For example, if an LSP does not protect other LSPs but is protected by other LSPs, Prim (for primary LSP) is listed. If an LSP protects other LSPs (a backup or backup of a backup), Back is listed. If an LSP has no protection characteristic, None is listed. If an LSP is a bypass LSP, it is pre-established to protect an LSP that traverses either a specific link (link bypass LSP) or node (node bypass LSP), and Bypas is listed.

The following example displays information for RSVP LSPs that are currently shut down:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp down
                 RSVP LSPs



LSP       ID   Ingress      Endpoint     State  FRR Origin   Protection

W-E-lsp   1    10.1.1.2     10.2.1.2     Shut       Ingress  None 

The following example displays information for RSVP LSPs that are currently up:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp up
                 RSVP LSPs



LSP       ID   Ingress      Endpoint     State  FRR Origin   Protection

W-E-bkup  1    10.1.1.2     10.2.1.2     Up         Ingress  Backup    

E-W-lsp   2    10.2.1.2     10.1.1.2     Up         Egress   None      

The following example displays information for egress RSVP LSPs:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp egress
                 RSVP LSPs



LSP       ID   Ingress      Endpoint     State  FRR Origin   Protection

E-W-lsp   2    10.2.1.2     10.1.1.2     Up         Egress   None      

The following example displays information for ingress RSVP LSPs:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp ingress
LSP                  TID Ingress      Endpoint     State FRR O Prtct 
R1-R5-backup         1   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.205 Up        I Back 
R1-R5-prim           1   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.205 Up    8   I Prim 
R1-R6-backup         3   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.206 Up        I Back 
R1-R6-prim           3   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.206 Up    7   I Prim 
R1-R3-bypass         4   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.203 Up        I Bypas 
R1-R2-prim           6   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.202 Up    7   I None 
R1-R2-bypass         7   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.202 Up        I Bypas 
R1-R5-bypass-node-R3 8   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.205 Up        I Bypas 
R1-R3-prim           9   10.2.250.201 10.2.250.203 Up    4   I None 
R1-R4-prim           10  10.2.250.201 10.2.250.204 Up    7   I None

This example shows information on incoming packet in the local MPLS-enabled network where RSVP is used to communicate labels and their meaning among label-switched routers (LSRs). At each incoming (ingress) point of the network, packets are assigned a label by an edge label-switched router (LSR). Packets are forwarded along a label-switched path (LSP) where each LSR makes forwarding decisions based on the label information. At each hop, the LSR swaps the existing label for a new label that tells the next hop how to forward the packet. At the outgoing (egress) point, an edge LSR removes the label, and forwards the packet to its destination. The show rsvp lsp ingress command displays the following:

LSP = The name of the LSP. All RSVP LSPs have a specific name.

TID = The Tunnel ID. It is unique per originating node, for a given LSP, so the ID can be 1 to 40,000.

Ingress = The IP address of the ingress of the LSP. Usually, this is the IP address of the router that the packet got its LSP from, but the ingress address is configurable for SE RSVP LSPs, so it can also be a loopback address.

Endpoint = The destination address of the LSP. Usually, this is the IP address of the destination router that the packet has its last hop to, but the address does not need to be the destination router's router ID, it can be a loopback address configured at the destination router.

State = The state of the LSP. The state can be Up, Down, Shut, or Stale.

FRR = If the LSP has a Fast-Reroute (FRR) bypass LSP that can protect it, then this field displays the tunnel ID of the bypass LSP that is protecting it. Otherwise, this field is empty.

0 = Origin, for the type of LSP with regards to where the local switch is in the path: I for ingress, E for egress, or T for transit.

Prtct = The protection characteristic of the LSP. For example, if it is an LSP that does not protect other LSPs but is protected by other LSPs, Prim (for primary LSP) is listed. If it is an LSP that protects other LSPs (a backup or backup of a backup), Back is listed. If it has no protection characteristic, None is listed. If it is a bypass LSP, it is pre-established to protect an LSP that traverses either a specific link (link bypass LSP) or node (node bypass LSP), and Bypas is listed.

The following example displays label information for all RSVP LSPs:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp label
LSP            State  Upstream lbl  Downstream lbl  

W-E-bkup       Up     N/A           262144          

W-E-lsp        Shut   N/A           0               

E-W-lsp        Up     3             N/A             

The following example displays information for RSVP LSPs protected with a backup LSP:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp protected
LSP            ID     Ingress      Endpoint     State   Backed up by

W-E-lsp        1      10.1.1.2     10.2.1.2     Shut    W-E-bkup 

The following example displays protection information for all RSVP LSPs:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp protection
Primary        State  Active Backup         State  Active 

W-E-lsp        Shut   No     W-E-bkup       Up     Yes    

The following example displays information for transmit RSVP LSPs:

[local]Redback>show rsvp lsp transit
                 RSVP LSPs



LSP       ID   Ingress      Endpoint     State  FRR Origin   Protection

W-E-bkup  1    10.1.1.2     10.2.1.2     Up         Transit  None

E-W-lsp   2    10.2.1.2     10.1.1.2     Up         Transit  None

The following example shows how to display summary information about all tracking-enabled LSPs currently configured on the router:

[local]Redback#show rsvp lsp track
LSP                       TID  Ingress         Endpoint        State FRR 

O Prtct

AC1_MTU1_azul             13   10.18.241.3     10.18.241.6     Down 

(tracking)

I None

AC1_AC2_rojo              22   10.18.241.3     10.18.241.4     Down 

(tracking)

I Prim

The following example shows how to display information about the AC1_MTU1_azul tracking-enabled LSP:

[local]Redback#show rsvp lsp track AC1_MTU1_azul


--- RSVP LSP AC1_MTU1_azul (Tunnel ID: 13) ---

Ingress             : 10.18.241.3     Endpoint            : 10.18.241.6

Origin              : Ingress         LSP State           : Down (tracking)

Extended Tunnel ID  : 10.18.241.3     LSP ID              : 1

Traffic-Eng         : default         State Transitions   : 2

Downstream Nhop     : 0.0.0.0         Downstream Intf     : 0.0.0.0

Downstream Intf Name:

Downstream Nbr      : 0.0.0.0         Downstream Label    : 0

Setup Priority      : 7               Holding Priority    : 0

Last Downstream Tx  : 58761           Last Downstream Rx  : 0

Next Timer in (sec) : 1271218063      Lifetime (sec)      : 0

Time to Die (sec)   : 0               B/W (Bytes/sec)     : 0

LSP cct             : Cct invalid

IGP Shortcut        : Disabled

Session Attr        : Local-Protect Node-Protect May-Reroute Record-Label

Use CSPF Route      : Yes             Record Route        : Yes

Dynamic Route       :

Tracking            : Track-mtu       Tracking State      : Down

CSPF Route          : Pending

The following example shows how to display detailed information about all tracking-enabled LSPs currently configured on the router:

[local]Redback#show rsvp lsp track detail


--- RSVP LSP AC1_MTU1_azul (Tunnel ID: 13) ---

Ingress             : 10.18.241.3     Endpoint            : 10.18.241.6

Origin              : Ingress         LSP State           : Down (tracking)

Extended Tunnel ID  : 10.18.241.3     LSP ID              : 1

Traffic-Eng         : default         State Transitions   : 2

Downstream Nhop     : 0.0.0.0         Downstream Intf     : 0.0.0.0

Downstream Intf Name:

Downstream Nbr      : 0.0.0.0         Downstream Label    : 0

Setup Priority      : 7               Holding Priority    : 0

Last Downstream Tx  : 59130           Last Downstream Rx  : 0

Next Timer in (sec) : 1271217694      Lifetime (sec)      : 0

Time to Die (sec)   : 0               B/W (Bytes/sec)     : 0

LSP cct             : Cct invalid

IGP Shortcut        : Disabled

Session Attr        : Local-Protect Node-Protect May-Reroute Record-Label

Use CSPF Route      : Yes             Record Route        : Yes

Dynamic Route       :

Tracking            : Track-mtu       Tracking State      : Down

CSPF Route          : Pending

--- RSVP LSP AC1_AC2_rojo (Tunnel ID: 22) ---

Ingress             : 10.18.241.3     Endpoint            : 10.18.241.4

Origin              : Ingress         LSP State           : Down (tracking)

Extended Tunnel ID  : 10.18.241.3     LSP ID              : 1

Traffic-Eng         : default         State Transitions   : 2

Downstream Nhop     : 0.0.0.0         Downstream Intf     : 0.0.0.0

Downstream Intf Name:

Downstream Nbr      : 0.0.0.0         Downstream Label    : 0

Setup Priority      : 7               Holding Priority    : 0

Last Downstream Tx  : 59764           Last Downstream Rx  : 0

Next Timer in (sec) : 1271217694      Lifetime (sec)      : 0

Time to Die (sec)   : 0               B/W (Bytes/sec)     : 0

LSP cct             : Cct invalid

IGP Shortcut        : Disabled

Session Attr        : Local-Protect Node-Protect May-Reroute Record-Label

Use CSPF Route      : Yes             Record Route        : Yes

Dynamic Route       :

LSP protected by LSP AC1_AC2_verde which is protected by LSP AC1_AC2_3camino

Tracking            : Track-mtu       Tracking State      : Down

CSPF Route          : Pending (21 retries)

1.21   show rsvp neighbor

show rsvp neighbor [ip-addr | detail]

1.21.1   Purpose

Displays Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) neighbor information.

1.21.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.21.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

Optional. Neighbor IP address. Displays detailed information for specified neighbor.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information for all neighbors.

1.21.4   Default

Displays summary RSVP information for all neighbors.

1.21.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp neighbor command to display RSVP neighbor information.

If the RSVP neighbor’s transport IP address differs from its router ID, the IP address specified in the neighbor ip-addr construct must be the RSVP neighbor’s transport IP address.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.21.6   Examples

The following example displays summary RSVP neighbor information for all RSVP interfaces:

[local]Redback>show rsvp neighbor
    --- All RSVP Neighbors ---


Nbr Address     GR      Rest-Time      Recov-Time     State

17.1.1.3        Yes     60             120            Up

20.1.1.1        Yes     30             60             Up

27.27.27.1      No      30             60             Hello Disabled

28.28.28.1      No      30             60             Hello Disabled

31.1.1.2        No      30             60             Hello Disabled

The summary includes the following information for all RSVP neighbors:

Nbr Address = Neighbor address: IP Address

GR = Graceful Restart Enabled: Yes/No

Rest-Time = Number of seconds that Nbr has to send “Hello” after restarting.

Recov-Time = Number of seconds that Nbr has to refresh LSPs after restarting.

State = Up/Down/Hello Disabled/Restarting

The following example displays detailed information for neighbor 17.1.1.3:

[local]Redback>show rsvp neighbor 17.1.1.3
    --- RSVP Neighbor 17.1.1.3 ---

Intf Name        :to-nbrA      GR Enabled        :Yes

Restart Time     :60 (sec)     Recovery Time     :120 (sec)

Nbr Restart Time :20 (sec)     Nbr Recovery Time :40 (sec)

Restart TTD      :14 (sec)     Recovery TTD      :54 (sec)

Hello Status     :Restarting   Nbr Restart Cnt   :9

Last Nbr Restart :09:48:21 Wed Oct 15 2008

Nbr flags        :0x0010       Nbr Reference Cnt :300

The detailed display includes the following information:

Intf Name = Interface Name GR Enabled = Graceful Restart Enabled: Yes/No

Restart Time = Number of seconds that the local node has to send “Hello” after restarting. Recovery Time = Number of seconds that the local node has to refresh LSPs after restarting. (Restart/Recovery Time is available only if RSVP Hello messages are enabled.)

Nbr Restart Time = Number of seconds that Nbr has to send “Hello” after restarting. Nbr Recovery Time = Number of seconds that Nbr has to refresh LSPs after restarting. (Restart/Recovery Time is available only if RSVP Hello messages are enabled.)

Restart TTD = Number of seconds remaining for Nbr to send “Hello”. Recovery TTD = Number of seconds remaining for Nbr to refresh LSPs.

Hello Status = Enabled/Disabled/Restarting Nbr Restart Cnt = Number of restarts since Nbr discovery.

Last Nbr Restart = Time and date of the last Nbr restart.

Nbr flags = Nbr flags. Nbr Reference Cnt = The number of structures currently referencing the nbr structure. Both path state blocks and resv state blocks can reference the nbr structure, so there is not always a 1-to-1 relationship between the number of LSPs and the Nbr Reference Cnt.

1.22   show rsvp track

show rsvp track [object-name | detail]

1.22.1   Purpose

Displays information about a specific RSVP tracking object or for all RSVP tracking objects currently configured on the router.

1.22.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.22.3   Syntax Description

object-name

Optional. Tracking object.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information about all tracking objects currently configured on the router.

1.22.4   Default

Displays summary information about all RSVP tracking objects that are currently configured on the router.

1.22.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show rsvp track command to display information about a specific RSVP tracking object or for all RSVP tracking objects currently configured on the router.

1.22.6   Examples

The following example shows how to display summary information about all tracking objects currently configured on the router:

[local]Redback#show rsvp track

Track Object         Member Count Observer Count Status

object1              1            0              DOWN

Track1               1            0              UP

Track-mtu            3            2              UP

The following example shows how to display information about a tracking object called object1:

[local]Redback#show rsvp track object1

Track Object object1 is DOWN

Number of members: 1

RSVP interface:1 is DOWN

Tracked by 0 observers

The following example shows how to display detailed information about all tracking objects currently configured on the router:

[local]Redback#show rsvp track detail


Track Object Track10 is DOWN

        Number of members: 0

        Tracked by 2 observers

         RSVP LSP:AC1MTU2AZUL

         RSVP LSP:AC1AG1VERDE


Track Object Track3 is DOWN         Number of members: 0

        Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track4 is DOWN

        Number of members: 0

        Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track5 is DOWN

        Number of members: 0

        Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track6 is DOWN

Number of members: 0

Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track7 is DOWN

Number of members: 0

Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track8 is DOWN

Number of members: 0

Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track9 is DOWN

        Number of members: 0         Tracked by 0 observers


Track Object Track-mtu is UP

        Number of members: 6

RSVP interface:IPst.2 is UP

RSVP interface:IPst.14 is DOWN

RSVP interface:abc3 is DOWN

RSVP interface:IPst.4 is UP

RSVP interface:abc is DOWN

RSVP interface:IPst.3 is DOWN

Tracked by 1 observers

RSVP LSP:AC1_MTU1_azul

Track Object Track-new is UP

Number of members: 1

        Tracked by 0 observers

1.23   show secured-arp

show secured-arp

1.23.1   Purpose

Displays secured Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) information.

1.23.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.23.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.23.4   Default

None

1.23.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show secured-arp command to display secured ARP information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands in any mode display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct in front of the show command to view output for the specified context without having to enter that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.23.6   Examples

The following example displays secured ARP information:

[local]Redback>show secured-arp



Total number of Secured ARP entries in cache: 1



Host                Interface           i/f grid      Circuit

20.1.1.187/32       to-dhcpclient       0x1000000b    11/1 vlan-id 11

20.2.10.0/24        test                0x10000002    11/2

1.24   show service

show service [filter]

1.24.1   Purpose

Displays enabled and disabled services.

1.24.2   Command Mode

1.24.3   Syntax Description

filter

Optional. Displays service filter information.

1.24.4   Default

None

1.24.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show service command to display enabled and disabled services.

Use the optional filter keyword to display service filter information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.24.6   Examples

The following example displays the output from the show service command:

[local]Redback>show service 
Context Services:

         multiple-contexts      enabled

         card-auto-reload       enabled

         console-break          disabled

         vxworks-log-to-screen  enabled

         upload-coredump        disabled

         crash-dump-dram        disabled

         auto-system-recovery   disabled

1.25   show snmp

show snmp {accesses | communities | server | targets | views}

1.25.1   Purpose

Displays Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) information, including usage, configured contexts, communities, SNMP daemon status, targets, and views.

1.25.2   Command Mode

1.25.3   Syntax Description

accesses

Optional. Displays usage.

communities

Optional. Displays the communities.

server

Optional. Displays the current state of the SNMP daemon and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) port on which it is currently configured to listen.

targets

Optional. Displays configured SNMP targets (notification receivers).

views

Optional. Displays the configured Management Information Base (MIB) views.

1.25.4   Default

None

1.25.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show snmp command to display SNMP statistics, including usage, configured contexts, communities, notifications, SNMP daemon status, targets, and views.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.25.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show snmp command with the views keyword:

[local]Redback>show snmp views
restricted system - included non-volatile

restricted snmp - included non-volatile

restricted snmpEngine - included non-volatile

restricted snmpMPDstats - included non-volatile

restricted usmStats - included non-volatile

1.26   show snmp alarm

show snmp alarm {active | cleared | model | stats}

1.26.1   Purpose

Displays Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) information for SNMP alarms.

1.26.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.26.3   Syntax Description

active

Display active alarms in Alarm MIB

cleared

Display cleared alarms

model

Display SNMP alarm model table

stats

Display statistics

1.26.4   Default

None

1.26.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show snmp alarm command to display SNMP alarm statistics, alarm model configuration, and lists of active and cleared alarms.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.26.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show snmp alarm command with the cleared keyword:

[local]Redback>show snmp alarm cleared

=============================================================================
Object name                 : Value
=============================================================================

alarmClearIndex             : 3
alarmClearDateAndTime       : 2009-4-9, 12:28:19, -8:0
alarmClearEngineID          : 80.0.9.30.83.0.0.30.88.1.45.8d [hex]
alarmClearEngineAddressType : ipv4(1)
alarmClearEngineAddress     : 10.12.49.19
alarmClearContextName       : local
alarmClearLogIndex          : 0
alarmClearNotificationID    : interfaces.3.3.4.5
alarmClearResourceId        : 0.0
alarmClearModelPointer      : 0.0

1.27   show snmp ping

show snmp ping [status {name ping-test-name} {details} | {result {name ping-test-name}{success | failed {history} {details}} {output}]

1.27.1   Purpose

Displays information about that status and results of scheduled ping tests.

1.27.2   Command Mode

1.27.3   Syntax Description

status

Displays the status of scheduled ping tests.

result

Displays the result of the ping test.

name ping-test-name

Limits displayed information to the ping test with the name you identify in the ping-test-name argument.

success

Displays ping tests that ran successfully.

failed

Displays ping tests that failed.

history

Displays a history of ping test results up to 12 ping tests.

details

Displays a detailed listing of ping test results.

1.27.4   Default

None

1.27.5   Usage Guidelines

Use this command to display the status and results of the scheduled ping tests. If a hostname is used as the ping target, the details keyword shows the resolved IP address of the hostname; otherwise, it shows the ping target IP address.

When you run the command from a non-local context, only the ping tests defined within that context will display. If you run the commands from the local context, you can view all defined ping tests and the output is organized by context.

1.27.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show snmp ping command with the result and history keywords:

[local]Redback>show snmp ping result history

Context: local, Owner: CLI

     name            idx status  sent recv min/max/avg rtt (ms) jitter

--------------------- --- ------- ---- ---- -------------------- ----

ip test #3          1 success     15     15     1000/1000/1000     0

ip test #3          2 success     15     15     1000/1000/1000     0

ip test #3          3 failed      15     0         0/0/0            0

ip test #4          1 failed      15     0         0/0/0             0

ip test #4          2 failed      15     0         0/0/0

The following example displays output from the show snmp ping command with the status and details keywords:

[local]Redback>show snmp ping status details

Context: local, Owner: CLI

name             status   protocol         target        freq  cnt

------------------- -------- ---------- -------------------- ----- ---

ip test             enabled   ip/icmp   ipaddr-or-hostname   86400 15

 timeout=60, df, size=nn, pattern=0xff, tos=0xff, ttl=255, src=1.2.3.4


Context: local, Owner: SNMP(test1)        
name             status   protocol         target        freq  cnt

------------------- -------- ---------- -------------------- ----- ---

ip test             enabled   ip/icmp   ipaddr-or-hostname   86400 15

 timeout=60, df, size=nn, pattern=0xff, tos=0xff, ttl=255, src=1.2.3.4

1.28   show spanning-tree

show spanning-tree bridge-name [details]

1.28.1   Purpose

Shows the spanning-tree information for the bridge instance.

1.28.2   Command Mode

exec

1.28.3   Syntax Description

bridge-name

Name of the bridge.

details

Show detailed spanning-tree information.

1.28.4   Default

1.28.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show spanning-tree to show the spanning-tree information for the bridge instance; that is, use the command to show the spanning-tree information that applies to the whole SmartEdge bridge.

1.28.6   Examples

The following example shows detailed spanning-tree information for the brdgrp1 bridge:

[local]Redback#show spanning-tree brdgrp1 details

1.29   show spanning-tree circuit

show spanning-tree bridge-name circuit circuit-id [details]

1.29.1   Purpose

Shows the spanning-tree information for specific circuits on the bridge.

1.29.2   Command Mode

exec

1.29.3   Syntax Description

bridge-name

Name of the bridge.

circuit circuit-id

Specifies circuits on the bridge. See Table 4 for the expanded syntax for the circuit-id argument.

details

Provide detailed spanning-tree information.

1.29.4   Default

1.29.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show spanning-tree to show the spanning-tree information for specific circuits on the bridge on the SmartEdge system.

The circuit-id argument is composed of the keywords and arguments as described in the following syntax:

slot/port {ethernet | vlan vlan-id}

Table 4 describes the components of the circuit-id argument:

Table 4    Building Blocks of the circuit-id Argument

Field

Description

slot

Chassis slot number of the traffic card with the bridged circuits.

port

Port number of the port with the bridged circuits.

ethernet

Clears all the circuits on the specified Ethernet port.

vlan vlan-id

A filter that limits the command to a specified virtual LAN (VLAN) 802.1Q tunnel or PVC. The vlan-id argument is one of the following constructs:

  • pvc-vlan-id—VLAN tag value of a PVC that is not within an 802.1Q tunnel.

  • tunl-vlan-id—VLAN tag value of an 802.1Q tunnel.

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id—VLAN tag value of an 802.1Q tunnel followed by the VLAN tag value for the PVC within the tunnel.

If you specify the VLAN tag value for an 802.1Q tunnel, this command clears subscriber sessions on all the PVCs within the tunnel.

The range of values for any VLAN tag value is 1 to 4095.

1.29.6   Examples

The following example shows detailed spanning-tree information specific to the circuits in the Ethernet port 2/1 in the brdgrp1 bridge:

[local]Redback#show spanning-tree brdgrp1 circuit 2/1 ethernet details

1.30   show sse

show sse {group | partition} [group_name [partition_name]] [detail]

1.30.1   Command Mode

all modes

1.30.2   Syntax Description

group

Displays SSE group information.

partition

Displays SSE card partition information.

group_name

Optional. Name of the SSE group. Displays information for the specified SSE group.

partition_name

Optional. Name of the partition. Displays information for the specified partition.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information for the specified SSE group or partition.

1.30.3   Usage Guidelines

Displays SSE group or SSE partition information.

See Table 5 for a description of the fields displayed in the output of the command.

Table 5    Command Output Field Descripitions

Output Field

Description

Group

SSE group name

ID

SSE group ID: 1 to 32

Description

Group description

State

Service state of the SSE group:

  • Up

  • Partial

  • Down

  • Stale —A stale group means that at least one of the partition's NFS mounts was not removed due to the card going out of service. You cannot modify a stale group until the state is corrected. You can recover the group by inserting an SSE card with disks in any slot to which the group is bound, or by reloading the system.

Redundancy

SSE group redundancy setting: Network or Disk

Revert

Switch mode configured: Enabled, Disabled

Disk Mode

Configured disk mode: RAID-0, RAID-1, or Independent

Switch Trigger Reason

If applicable, trigger reason for redundancy switch: N/A, Manual, or Auto

Switch Failed Reason

If applicable, switch failed reason: Alarm events

Partition(s)

Number of partitions configured

Name

Name of each partition configured

ID

Partition ID: 1 to 16

Group Name

Name of group

Group ID

Group ID: 1 to 32

State

Operational status of the partition: Up, Down, Stale

Size (GB)

Configured size of the partition

Percent Used (%)

Units of data (in GB) used on the partition as a percentage

Disk

Disk number, if designated: 1, 2, or All

Mirrored

Mirror data to standby disk, if network redundancy is configured: Enabled, Disabled, N/A

Alarm Low Space

Alarm for low partition space: Enabled or Disabled

Trigger Percentage

Triggering disk space in percentage; clear percentage in brackets

Alarm(s)

Alarms triggered on the partition

Primary

Primary slot assigned to the group: slot slot_num

Secondary

If redundancy is configured, the secondary slot assigned to the group: slot slot_num

Disk Mode

Configured disk mode for the group: RAID-0, RAID-1, or Independent

Redundancy State

The acting status of the redundancy group. Standalone is assigned for non-redundant groups: Active, Standby, or Standalone

Disk ID(s) Ready

Indicates which disks are ready for service: 1, 2, All, or None

Total Disk Size

Total disk size available on the slot/disk, rounded to the nearest GB

Data Status

The redundancy status of the data on the disk. Sync-in-progress means that the redundancy data is being synchronized from the current active slot/disk: Up-to-date or Sync-in-progress

Alarm(s)

Alarm(s) raised for the slot/disk.

Sync Progress

If synchronization is happening, it shows the progress as a status bar with percentage completed, as well as size synchronized and total to be synchronized.

Time Remaining

Estimated time remaining for the sync to complete: HH:MM:SS

Speed

Current speed of the sync in KB/sec

Mean Speed

Mean speed of the sync in KB/sec

1.30.4   Examples

[local]Redback#show sse group
Group            ID Redundancy        Disk Mode   Slot    State
-----------------------------------------------------------------
grp1             1  network-redundant Independent 2 (5)   Down
[local]Redback#show sse group detail
Name                : grp1
ID                  : 1
Description         :
------------------------------------------------------------------------
State               : Up
Redundancy          : network-redundant
Disk Mode           : Independent
Revert              : no revert
Switch Reason       : Standby INS
Switch Failed Reason: No Reason
Alarms              : NONE

Partition(s)        :
--------------------------------------------
Name                : ptn1             ID                  : 1
Group Name          : grp1             Group ID            : 1
State               : Up
Size (GB)           : 2                Percent Used        : 9
Disk                : 1                Mirrored            : Enabled
Alarm Low Space     : Enabled          Trigger Percentage  : 80 (clear 70)
Alarms              : NONE

Name                : ptn2             ID                  : 2
Group Name          : grp1             Group ID            : 1
State               : Up
Size (GB)           : 2                Percent Used        : 2
Disk                : 1                Mirrored            : Disabled
Alarm Low Space     : Enabled          Trigger Percentage  : 80 (clear 70)
Alarms              : NONE


Primary Slot        : 2
--------------------------------------------
Redundancy State    : Active           Slot State          : Up
Disk ID(s) Ready    : All              Total Size (GB)     : 268
Data Status         : Up-To-Date
Active Alarms       : NONE

Secondary Slot      : 5
--------------------------------------------
Redundancy State    : Standby          Slot State          : Up
Disk ID(s) Ready    : 1                Total Size (GB)     : 134
Data Status         : Up-To-Date
Active Alarms       : NONE
[local]Redback#show sse partition
Group            ID Partition        ID Size (GB) Disk   State
----------------------------------------------------------------
grp1             1  ptn1             1  2         1      Up
grp1             1  ptn2             2  2         1      Up
[local]Redback#show sse partition detail
Name                : ptn1             ID                  : 1
Group Name          : grp1             Group ID            : 1
State               : Up
Size (GB)           : 2                Percent Used        : 9
Disk                : 1                Mirrored            : Enabled
Alarm Low Space     : Enabled          Trigger Percentage  : 80 (clear 70)
Alarms              : NONE

Name                : ptn2             ID                  : 2
Group Name          : grp1             Group ID            : 1
State               : Up
Size (GB)           : 2                Percent Used        : 2
Disk                : 1                Mirrored            : Disabled
Alarm Low Space     : Enabled          Trigger Percentage  : 80 (clear 70)
Alarms              : NONE

1.31   show sse counters

show sse {group | partition} counters [group_name [partition_name]]

1.31.1   Command Mode

all modes

1.31.2   Syntax Description

group

Displays SSE group information.

partition

Displays SSE card partition information.

group_name

Name of the SSE group.

partition_name

Name of the partition.

1.31.3   Usage Guidelines

Displays SSE group or SSE partition counters.

1.31.4   Examples

[local]Redback#show sse group counters
Name                : grp1
ID                  : 1
Redundancy          : network-redundant
Primary Slot        : 2                Redundancy State    : Active
Secondary Slot      : 5                Redundancy State    : Standby

Partition(s)        :
------------------------------------------------------------------------
timestamp: 11486967468
timestamp secs: 11486  timestamp usecs: 967468

Name                : ptn1             ID                  : 1
Group Name          : grp1             Group ID            : 1
Disk Allocated      : 1                Partition Size (GB) : 2
Percent Used        : 9                Percent Available   : 91
Network Send        : 2097100
Network Received    : 0
Disk Write (KB)     : 12
Disk Read (KB)      : 2097826
Activity Log        : 1
Bit Map             : 128
Local Count         : 0
Local Pending       : 0
Unacknowledged      : 0
Application Pending : 0

timestamp: 11486968702
timestamp secs: 11486  timestamp usecs: 968702

Name                : ptn2             ID                  : 2
Group Name          : grp1             Group ID            : 1
Disk Allocated      : 1                Partition Size (GB) : 2
Percent Used        : 2                Percent Available   : 98
Network Send        : 0
Network Received    : 0
Disk Write (KB)     : 32
Disk Read (KB)      : 738
Activity Log        : 2
Bit Map             : 0
Local Count         : 0
Local Pending       : 0
Unacknowledged      : 0
Application Pending : 0

1.32   show ssh-attributes

show ssh-attributes

1.32.1   Purpose

Displays information about configured Secure Shell (SSH) attributes and the number of current connections.

1.32.2   Command Mode

1.32.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.32.4   Default

None

1.32.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ssh-attributes command to display information about configured SSH attributes and the number of current connections.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.32.6   Examples

The following example displays SSH attributes:

[local]Redback>show ssh-attributes
                ssh attributes

                --------------

                start-drop      50      (connections)

                rate-drop       100      (percentage)

                full-drop       50      (connections)

                current         0       (connections)

1.33   show static route

show static route [print-prefix] [all]

1.33.1   Purpose

Displays static route information.

1.33.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.33.3   Syntax Description

print-prefix

Optional. Displays the IP address and prefix length for static routes with multiple next hops. By default, entries in the Prefix field are left blank.

all

Optional. Displays static route information for all contexts.

1.33.4   Default

None

1.33.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show static route command to display static route information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

Table 6 describes the show static route command output fields.

Table 6    Field Descriptions for the show static route Command

Field

Description

Prefix

IP address and prefix length.

Best

  • Yes—Indicates that the next hop or path is considered the best path.

  • No—Indicates that it is not the best next hop or path. It has a hyphen (-) attached if the prefix has not been advertised into the RIB.

NType

Next-hop type. The types can be addr (IP address), intf (interface), dvsr, and cntx (context). The dvsr next-hop type is a special type of IP address.

Addr/Intf/Cntx

Detail next-hop information. The information displayed can either be an IP address, an interface name, a context name, or null0 (a special interface name).

NS

Next-hop status. The status is either up or dn (down). It reflects the status of either the next-hop IP address reachability, the next-hop interface status, or the next-hop context.

Dist

Route distance to be advertised into the RIB.

P

An asterisk (*) indicates that the route is a permanent announced route.

Tag

Tag value of the prefix.

1.33.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show static route command:

[local]Redback>show static route
  Prefix             Best  NType Addr/Intf/Cntx    NS  Dist  P  Tag

  8.1.1.1/30         yes   dvsr  165.63.39.15      up  1        0x0

  10.1.1.0/24        yes   intf  ether3/1          up  1        0x0

                     no    intf  op-net-lan        up  10       0x0

  10.1.2.0/24        yes   intf  to-redback        up  1        0x0

  10.11.12.0/24      yes   cntx  foo               up  1        0x0

  20.0.0.0/8         yes   intf  to-redback        up  1        0x0

                     yes   addr  165.63.39.1       up  1        0x0

  30.0.0.0/8         yes   intf  null0             up  1        0x0

  40.1.0.0/16        no-   cntx  vpn-abc           dn  1        0x0

  50.1.2.0/24        yes   addr  165.63.39.2       up  1     *  0x0



  Total static route in context local: 8, total path: 10

1.34   show subscribers

To display the basic subscriber status fields:

show subscribers [{agent-circuit-id id | agent-remote-id id | all | {session slot/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]] [circuit-id]} | session l2tp lns id | username subscriber}]

To display the digital subscriber line (DSL) attributes associated with subscribers:

show subscribers access-line [{agent-circuit-id id | agent-remote-id id | all | {session slot/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]] [circuit-id]} | session l2tp lns id | username subscriber}]

To display the attributes of active subscriber sessions:

show subscribers active [{agent-circuit-id id | agent-remote-id id | all | {session slot/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]] [circuit-id]} | session l2tp lns id | username subscriber}]

To display the Mobile IP attributes associated with subscribers:

show subscribers mobile-ip [{agent-circuit-id id | agent-remote-id id | all | {session slot/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]] [circuit-id]} | session l2tp lns id | username subscriber}]

To display the authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) logs of subscribers:

show subscribers log [{{session slot/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]] [circuit-id]} | session l2tp lns id | username subscriber}]

To display a summary of subscriber information:

show subscribers summary [all]

To display IP information associated with subscribers:

show subscribers address username subscriber

1.34.1   Purpose

Displays subscriber information.

1.34.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.34.3   Syntax Description

agent-circuit-id id

Optional. A filter that limits the information displayed to the subscriber specified by the agent circuit ID in a subscriber record. Enter the id argument as a structured subscriber username in the form subscriber@context.

agent-remote-id id

Optional. A filter that limits the information displayed to the subscriber specified by the agent remote ID in a subscriber record. Enter the id argument as a structured subscriber username in the form subscriber@context.

all

Optional. Displays information about all subscribers in all contexts. This keyword is available only to administrators in the local context.

session

Optional. Limits the command output to the specified session or circuit.

slot

Optional. Chassis slot number for a traffic card.

port

Optional. Port number on the specified traffic card.

chan-num

Optional. Channel number on the specified port. If omitted, this command applies to all channels on the specified port.

This option is valid only on channelized DS-3, E1, OC-12 and STM-1 traffic cards.

Table 8 lists the range of values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num arguments for various types of channelized ports.

sub-chan-num

Optional. Subchannel number in the specified channel. If omitted, this command applies to all subchannels in the specified channel.

This option is valid only on channelized OC-12 and STM-1 traffic cards.

Table 8 lists the range of values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num arguments for various types of channelized ports.

circuit-id

Optional. A subscriber session identifier, or a subscriber username that filters which subscriber information this command displays. See Table 7 for information about the circuit-id argument.

l2tp lns id

Optional. Limits the output of the command output to the specified Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) network server (LNS) circuit.

username subscriber

Optional. Limits the command output to subscribers specified by a subscriber name. Enter the subscriber argument as a structured subscriber username in the form subscriber@context.

access-line

Optional. Displays the DSL attributes.

active

Optional. Displays the attributes of active subscriber sessions.

mobile-ip

Optional. Displays the Mobile IP attributes for the specified subscriber sessions.

log

Optional. Displays the AAA log.

summary

Optional. Displays the total number of subscribers and their encapsulations in the current context.

address

Optional. Displays the IP information.

1.34.4   Default

Displays information for all active subscribers in the current context.

1.34.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show subscribers command to display subscriber information. This includes basic subscriber status fields, DSL attributes, attributes of active subscriber sessions, Mobile IP attributes, AAA log or logs, a summary of subscriber information, and IP addresses associated with subscribers.

The circuit-id argument represents the following keywords and arguments; see Table 7:

clips [clips-session] | pppoe [pppoe-session] | vlan-id vlan-id [pppoe [pppoe-session] | clips [clips-session]] | vpi-vci vpi vci [pppoe [pppoe-session] | clips [clips-session]]

Table 7    Building Blocks of the circuit-id Argument

Construct

Description

clips clips-session

A filter that limits the command to a specified CLIPS circuit on a port, channel, 802.1Q PVC, or ATM PVC. If the CLIPS circuit is on an 802.1Q or ATM PVC, also specify the circuit identifier for the 802.1Q or ATM PVC. If the session is not specified, the command applies to all CLIPS sessions in the context.

The range of values for the clips-session argument is 1 to 262,144.

pppoe pppoe-session

A filter that limits the command to a specified PPPoE session. If the pppoe-session argument is not specified, the command applies to all PPPoE sessions in the context.

vlan-id vlan-id

A filter that limits the command to a specified virtual LAN (VLAN) 802.1Q tunnel or PVC. The vlan-id argument is one of the following constructs:

  • vlan-id pvc-vlan-idVLAN tag value of a PVC that is not within an 802.1Q tunnel.

  • vlan-id tunl-vlan-idVLAN tag value of an 802.1Q tunnel.

  • vlan-id tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-idVLAN tag value of an 802.1Q tunnel followed by the VLAN tag value for the PVC within the tunnel.

If you specify the VLAN tag value for an 802.1Q tunnel, this command clears subscriber sessions on all the PVCs within the tunnel.

The range of values for any VLAN tag value is 1 to 4,095.

vpi-vci vpi vci

A filter that limits the command to a specified ATM PVC. The ATM PVC is specified by the virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The range of values is 0 to 255 and 1 to 65,534, respectively.

The slot and port assignments for the SmartEdge routers are described in their respective hardware guides.

Table 8 lists the range of values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num arguments for various types of channelized ports. The SmartEdge 100, SmartEdge 800s, and SmartEdge 1200 routers do not support channelized ports.

Table 8    Range of Values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num Arguments

Port

Channel Types

chan-num Range

sub-chan-num Range

Channelized OC-12

DS-3, DS-1

1 to 12

1 to 28

Channelized STM-1

E1, DS-0 channel group

1 to 63

1 to 31

Channelized DS-3

DS-1

1 to 28

Channelized E1

DS-0 channel group

1 to 31

Use the access-line keyword to display information about DSL line attributes for each subscriber. The output information includes the parameters learned from the DSL attribute extension Type, Length, Value (TLV) in the General Switch Management Protocol (GSMP) Port Up message for the DSL.

The DSL attributes are learned from the DSL access multiplexer (DSLAM). They can be learned by GSMP messages and from PPPoE or DHCP tags during a subscriber session setup. Each learned attribute is preceded by the words Access Node Control Protocol (ANCP) or DSL Forum (DSLF) when printed. This indicates the mechanism by which it was learned. For example, ANCP means it was learned by ANCP; DSLF was learned from a tag during subscriber session setup; and so forth.

Table 9 lists the types of DSL data and the values that this command can display.

Table 9    Data Displayed by the access-line Keyword

Type of Data

Value

Agent-Circuit-ID

This includes DSLAM slot, port and channel number.

Internal Circuit

This includes the internal circuit number, slot, port and channel numbers.

Neighbor ID

Neighbor ID number

DSL Line State

  • SHOWTIME (DSL is active)

  • IDLE (DLS is down)

  • SILENT (DSL is down)

DSL Data Rates

  • Actual data rates upstream (inbound to the SmartEdge router) and downstream (outbound from the SmartEdge router) in Kbps

  • Minimum and maximum data rates upstream and downstream in Kbps

  • Attainable data rates upstream and downstream in Kbps

  • Minimum low-power data rates upstream and downstream in Kbps

  • Actual and maximum interleaving delay upstream and downstream in msec

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

Use the show bindings command to get the binding information that optionally can be specified in the show subscribers command. For information on the show bindings command, see the Command List.

The show subscribers command used with the active keyword, provides information on the dynamic policy rules applied to active subscriber sessions.

The slot and port numbering rules for the SmartEdge 100, SmartEdge 400, and SmartEdge 800 routers are described in their respective hardware guides.

1.34.6   Examples

The following example shows the default output:

[local]Redback>show subscribers



Type     CIRCUIT  SUBSCRIBER          CONTEXT     START TIME

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

PPPOE    00001   pppoe@redback.com    company1    JUN 30 17:46:49 2005

VIPSRC   00002   00:dd:00:00:00:01    isp1        JUN 30 00:03:11 2005

VIPSRC   00003   00:dd:00:00:00:02    isp1        JUN 30 00:03:01 2005

VIPSRC   00004   00:dd:00:00:00:03    isp1        JUN 30 00:03:01 2005

VIPSRC   00005   00:dd:00:00:00:04    isp1        JUN 30 00:03:11 2005

VIPSRC   00006   00:dd:00:00:00:05    isp1        JUN 30 00:03:11 2005

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Total=6 

 

Type            Authenticating          Active          Disconnecting

PPP                          0               0                      0

PPPoE                        0               1                      0

DOT1Q                        0               0                      0

CLIPs                        0               5                      0

ATM-B1483                    0               0                      0

ATM-R1483                    0               0                      0

The following example displays the information for an active subscriber; it includes both the absolute timeout action and traffic limit action fields:

[local]Redback>show subscribers active username client32@lns.com
client32@lns.com

        Circuit   L2TP LNS 8744119

        Internal Circuit   255/16:1023:63/5/2/8744119

        Current port-limit unlimited

        context-name lns (applied)

        ip pool   (applied from sub_default)

        absolute timeout action 1 (applied from sub_default)

        traffic limit action 1 (applied from sub_default)

        ip address 192.168.27.2 (applied from pool)

        timeout absolute 60 (applied)

        timeout idle 60 (applied)
        ...

The following example shows the dynamic policy access control lists (ACLs) applied in the forward direction to the active subscriber session usr1@local. For information on the dynamic policy fields displayed in both show commands, see the show access-group command in the Command List:

[local]Redback>show subscribers active

usr1@local

        Circuit   2/1 clips 1

        Internal Circuit   2/1:1023:63/4/2/1

        Interface bound  clips1

        Current port-limit unlimited

        ip address 11.1.0.1 (applied)

        forward policy in forpol (applied)

        dynamic policy acl  (applied in: fwd)

           ip in forward srcip 11.1.0.51/32 tos 0x08 0x1e class c1 fwd

           ip in forward srcip 11.1.0.51/32 tos 0x40 0xe0 class c1 fwd

           ip in forward srcip 11.1.0.51/32 tos 0x48 0xfe class c1 fwd

           ip in forward srcip 11.1.0.51/32 tos 0x0c 0x1e class c1 fwd

           ip in forward srcip 11.1.0.51/32 dscp af41 class c1 fwd

Use the show subscribers active all command to view if the RFlow profile is applied to the subscriber in the ingress direction (in), egress direction (out), or bi-directionally (both). In the following example, you will see that the flow ip profile has been applied at ingress:

[local]Redback# show subscribers active all

client2162833@local

Circuit 4/1:1 vpi-vci 33 145 pppoe 2450

Internal Circuit 4/1:1:63/1/2/8193

Interface bound subs 

Current port-limit unlimited

ip pool subs (applied from sub_default)

ip source-validation 1 (applied from sub_default)

ip address 2.2.0.1 (applied from pool)

flow ip profile ingress-flow:in (applied)

The following example includes DSL fields in the command output:

[local]Redback>show subscribers access-line
test@local

        Agent Circuit ID "DSLAM1-slot0-port0-channel2"

        Internal Circuit   4/3:1023:63/1/2/6

        Neighbor ID 10.13.16.98:6068

        ANCP Line State    SHOWTIME

        ANCP Actual Data Rate Downstream (kbps)    7777 (applied)

1.35   show system alarm

For ports on channelized OC-12 or STM-1 traffic cards, the syntax is:

show system alarm [all | slot[/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]]]]

For channelized ports on DS-3 or E1 traffic cards, the syntax is:

For SSE cards, the syntax is:

show system alarm [all | sse [group_ID [partition_ID]]]

For clear-channel ports on DS-3, E3, or E1 traffic cards, or ports on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) OC, ATM DS-3, Ethernet, or Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) traffic cards, the syntax is:

show system alarm [all | slot[/port]]

1.35.1   Purpose

Displays system-level, card-level, port-level, channel-level, or subchannel-level alarms.

1.35.2   Command Mode

1.35.3   Syntax Description

all

Optional. Displays alarms at all levels.

slot

Optional. Chassis slot number of the traffic card for which card-, port-, channel-, and subchannel-level alarms are displayed.

port

Optional. Card port number of the port for which port-, channel-, and subchannel-level alarms are displayed.

chan-num

Optional. Channel number for which channel- and subchannel-level alarms are displayed. The range of values depends on the type of port; see Table 10 for the range of values.

sub-chan-num

Optional. Subchannel number for which subchannel-level alarms are displayed. The range of values depends on the type of port; see Table 10 for the range of values.

sse

Optional. Displays alarm information for all SSE group and partition alarms.

group_ID

Optional. Displays alarm information for the specified SSE group ID. See the output of the show sse group command for valid values.

partition_ID

Optional. Displays alarm information for the specified partition ID. See the output of the show sse partition command for valid values.

1.35.4   Default

Displays system-level alarms only.

1.35.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show system alarm command to display system-level, card-level, port-level, channel-level, or subchannel-level alarms.

Table 10 lists the range of values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num arguments for various types of channelized ports.

Table 10    Range of Values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num Arguments

Port

Channel Types

chan-num Range

sub-chan-num Range

Channelized OC-12

DS-3, DS-1

1 to 12

1 to 28

Channelized STM-1

E1, DS-0 channel group

1 to 63

1 to 31

Channelized DS-3

DS-1

1 to 28

Channelized E1

DS-0 channel group

1 to 31

Each succeeding argument restricts the display to the alarms at that level and below and to the alarms for that card, or port, channel, or subchannel.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

Use the show port detail command (in any mode) to view the alarms for a port. See the Command List for more information.

Use the show diag command (in any mode) to view the results of the power-on diagnostics (POD) or on-demand diagnostics (ODD).

1.35.6   Examples

The following example displays system-level alarms only:

[local]Redback>show system alarm
Timestamp       Type              Source      Severity  Descriptions

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dec 16 19:32:01 chassis                       Minor     Chassis power failure - side B

The following example displays all system-level alarms:

[local]Redback#show system alarm all
Timestamp       Type              Source         Severity  Description
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jul 27 13:24:35 chassis                          Minor     Chassis power failure - side A1
Jul 27 13:24:35 chassis                          Minor     Chassis power failure - side A2
Jul 27 16:27:32 sse               5d2            Major     Hard disk missing
Jul 27 13:24:36 xcrp4-base        7              Major     Backup fail: peer dead
Jul 27 13:24:36 xcrp4-base        8              Critical  Controller missing
Jul 27 13:24:46 xcrp4-base        8              Major     Controller auto switch completed

The following example displays alarms at the traffic card level and below only; in this case, the traffic card is not installed:

[local]Redback#show system alarm 4
Timestamp       Type              Source         Severity  Descriptions

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dec 10 18:48:33 ch-oc12ds3-1-port 4              Critical  Circuit pack missing

The following example displays alarms at the port-level and below only; in this case, only a channel alarm is present:

[local]Redback#show system alarm 13/2
Timestamp       Type          Source    Severity  Descriptions

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dec 10 18:48:49 oc12-4-port   13/2:1    Major     Path alarm indication signal (AIS-P)

1.36   show system nvlog

show system nvlog

1.36.1   Purpose

Displays the contents of nonvolatile memory (NVRAM) on the controller card to which you are connected.

1.36.2   Command Mode

1.36.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.36.4   Default

None

1.36.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show system nvlog to display the contents of NVRAM on the controller card to which you are connected. The NVRAM stores logs of trap- and panic-related messages from the operating system and can be used to help debug system crashes in the absence of a local console (connected to the Craft 2 port). If your system does not support NVRAM, you receive the following error message: This XCRP doesn't support this feature.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.36.6   Examples

The following example displays the contents of the NVRAM on the active controller card:

[local]Redback>show system nvlog 
panic: testing 

Redback: dumpsys called 

dumping to dev 10,33 offset 8 

dump succeeded 

!!!vxWorks sent REBOOT intr, will shutdown BSD!!! 

!!!vxWorks sent REBOOT intr, will shutdown BSD!!! 

!!!vxWorks sent REBOOT intr, will shutdown BSD!!! 

1.37   show tacacs+ server

show tacacs+ server [{{ip-addr | hostname} [port tcp-port]}]

1.37.1   Purpose

Displays information for one or all Terminal Access Controller Access Control System Plus (TACACS+) servers in the current context.

1.37.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.37.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

Optional. IP address of the TACACS+ server for which more detailed information is to be displayed. Additional information includes detailed error and status counters, such as packets received and transmitted.

hostname

Optional. Hostname of the TACACS+ server.

port tcp-port

Optional. TACACS+ server Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) port. The range of values is 1 to 65,536. If no port is specified, TCP port number 49 is used.

1.37.4   Default

None

1.37.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show tacacs+ server command to display information for one or all TACACS+ servers in the current context, including the IP address and the key set by the tacacs+ server command (in context configuration mode), and the values set by the tacacs+ max-retries and tacacs+ timeout commands (in context configuration mode).

Use the ip-addr or hostname argument to display detailed information for a particular server; otherwise, the system displays summary information for all servers in the context.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.37.6   Examples

The following example displays summary information for all TACACS+ servers in the context:

[local]Redback#show tacacs+ server
IP Address/Hostname Port Timeout/Max-Tries Key

-----------------------------------------------------------------

10.12.121.211       49   5/1               mykey

10.12.209.171       49   5/1               otherkey

The following example displays information for a specific TACACS+ server:

[local]Redback#show tacacs+ server 10.12.211.121
IP Address/Hostname     Port    State           In-svc          Key

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

10.12.211.121           49      untried         alive           mykey

 

Counter                          Value

-------                        ----------

Current sessions                        0

Transmitted packets                     8

Received packets                        8

Dropped packets                         0

Connection errors                       0

Connection timeouts                     0

Host unreachable errors                 0

Transmission errors                     0

Reception errors                        0

Authentication timeouts                 0

Authorization timeouts                  0

Accounting timeouts                     0

1.38   show tcp

show tcp [{brief [all] | md5 | statistics | tcb tcpcb-addr}]

1.38.1   Purpose

Displays Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) Internet connections, statistics, and keepalive settings.

1.38.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.38.3   Syntax Description

brief

Optional. Displays active Internet connections.

all

Optional. Displays active Internet connections, including servers. Used with the brief keyword.

md5

Optional. Displays Message Digest 5 (MD5) entries.

statistics

Optional. Displays TCP statistics.

tcb tcpcb-addr

Optional. TCP connection for which details are to be displayed.

1.38.4   Default

None

1.38.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show tcp command to display TCP Internet connections, statistics, and keepalive settings.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.38.6   Examples

The following example displays output when the statistics keyword is specified:

[local]Redback>show tcp statistics
tcp:

        85778 packets sent

                33921 data packets (934491 bytes)

                323 data packets (91638 bytes) retransmitted

                26522 ack-only packets (77668 delayed)

                0 URG only packets

                0 window probe packets

                24871 window update packets

                141 control packets

        123389 packets received

                33053 acks (for 936341 bytes)

                537 duplicate acks

                0 acks for unsent data

                102667 packets (37396219 bytes) received in-sequence

                132 completely duplicate packets (189 bytes)

                0 old duplicate packets

                167 packets with some dup. data (232 bytes duped)

                39 out-of-order packets (13 bytes)

                0 packets (0 bytes) of data after window

                0 window probes

                7 window update packets

                1 packet received after close

                0 discarded for bad checksums

                0 discarded for bad header offset fields

                0 discarded because packet too short

        26 connection requests

        75 connection accepts

        82 connections established (including accepts)

        98 connections closed (including 24 drops)

        18 embryonic connections dropped

        32255 segments updated rtt (of 32538 attempts)

        333 retransmit timeouts

                1 connection dropped by rexmit timeout

        0 persist timeouts (resulting in 0 dropped connections)

        110 keepalive timeouts

                86 keepalive probes sent

                24 connections dropped by keepalive

        6023 correct ACK header predictions

        89333 correct data packet header predictions

        224 PCB hash misses 

        64 dropped due to no socket

        0 connections drained due to memory shortage

        1 bad connection attempt

       79 SYN cache entries added

                0 hash collisions

                75 completed

                0 aborted (no space to build PCB)

                0 timed out

                0 dropped due to overflow

                0 dropped due to bucket overflow

                4 dropped due to RST

                0 dropped due to ICMP unreachable

        1 SYN,ACK retransmitted

        1 duplicate SYN received for entries already in the cache

        0 SYNs dropped (no route or no space) 

The following example displays output when a TCP connection address is specified:

[local]Redback>show tcp tcb 0xe091a630
TCP Protocol Control Block at 0xe091a630:



Timers:         REXMT: 1430     PERSIST: 0      KEEP: 15827     2MSL: 0



State: ESTABLISHED, flags 0x38a0, inpcb 0xe090ca80



rxtshift 0, rxtcur 3, dupacks 0

peermss 498, ourmss 8152, segsz 498



snd_una 2215311423, snd_nxt 2215311425, snd_up 2215311423

snd_wl1 16681764, snd_wl2 2215311423, iss 2215310590, snd_wnd 8271



rcv_wnd 24456, rcv_nxt 16681766, rcv_up 16681764, irs 16681574

rcv_adv 16706222, snd_max 2215311425, snd_cwnd 51294, snd_ssthresh 1073725440

max_sndwnd 8466



idle 0, rtt 1, rtseq 2215311423, srtt 35, rttvar 3, rttmin 2



oobflags 0, iobc 0, softerror 0



snd_scale 0, rcv_scale 0, req_r_scale 0, req_s_scale 0

ts_recent 0, ts_regent_age 0, last_ack_sent 16681766

The following example displays the output of this command when no keywords or arguments are specified:

[local]Redback>show tcp 



Active Internet connections

PCB      Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address         Foreign Address        State

99e1a28       0      0 10.12.49.56.23        155.53.44.159.38903    ESTABLISHED

99e1960       0      0 10.12.49.56.23        155.53.44.159.43022    ESTABLISHED

99e1898       0      0 127.0.2.5.64524       127.0.2.3.6667         ESTABLISHED

99e17d0       0      0 127.0.2.5.56326       *.*                    LISTEN

99e1708       0      0 127.0.2.5.57435       127.0.2.3.6667         ESTABLISHED

99e1640       0      0 127.0.2.5.51241       127.0.2.3.6666         ESTABLISHED

99e1578       0      0 127.0.2.5.54221       127.0.2.3.6666         ESTABLISHED



IP Path MTU discovery is enabled

TCP keep-alive idle = 14400

TCP keep-alive interval = 150

TCP keep-alive count = 8

1.39   show tech-support

show tech-support [ase]

1.39.1   Purpose

Displays system information that helps your technical support representative resolve issues.

1.39.2   Command Mode

1.39.3   Syntax Description

ase

Optional. Connects to each ASP in the system and collects debug and status information for use by technical support. (1)

(1)  This keyword, although visible in the CLI, is not available for SM family platforms.

1.39.4   Default

None

1.39.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show tech-support command to display information that helps your technical support representative resolve issues. The information contains software version information, system uptime, task information, configuration information, and current state of each traffic card.

Use the ase option to display information for each ASP in the system.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.39.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show tech-support command in the order that they appear (in the interests of brevity, only the headings are listed):

[local]Redback#show tech-support



------------------ Current time -------------------

Mon Jun 27 10:00:01 PDT 2005







------------------ Version Info -------------------



Redback Networks SmartEdge OS Version SE800-5.0.5-Release

Built by sysbuild@@lx-lsf93 Mon Jan 23 10:00:01 PDT 2006

Copyright (C) 1998-2006, Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

System Bootstrap version is PowerPC,1.0b1266

Router Up Time -   21 hours 26 minutes 23 secs



------------------ Release info -------------------



Installed releases:



p01: active (will be booted after next reload)

----------------------------------------------

Version SE800-5.0.3.0-Release

Built on Mon Dec 19 10:00:01 PDT 2005

Copyright (C) 1998-2003, Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.



p02: alternate

--------------

Version SE800-5.0.3.0-Release

Built on Mon Dec  19 01:00:03 PDT 2005

Copyright (C) 1998-2005, Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.



------------------ show chassis ---------------

.

------------------ Redundancy info ---------------

.

------------------ show configuration---------------

.

------------------ Command history---------------

.

------------------ Hardware details ---------------

.

------------------ Memory Info -------------------

.

------------------ Crashfile information ----------

.

------------------ Process Crash Info ------------

.

------------------ show task info------------------

.

----------------- Interface Details ---------------

.

----------------- Route Table Summary --------------

.

----------------- Multicast Route -----------------

.

----------------- Linecard FIB Info ---------------

.

----------------- Linecard Info -------------------

.

----------------- Port Details --------------------

.

----------------- Port Counters --------------------

.

----------------- Database Info ----------------------

.

1.40   show terminal

show terminal

1.40.1   Purpose

Displays terminal settings for the current session.

1.40.2   Command Mode

1.40.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.40.4   Default

None

1.40.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show terminal command to display terminal settings for the current session.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.40.6   Examples

The following example displays the terminal settings for the current session:

[local]Redback>show terminal



terminal name    = /dev/ttyp0

terminal width   = 98

terminal length  = 50

terminal monitor = disabled

1.41   show transaction

show transaction

1.41.1   Purpose

Displays information about outstanding configuration database transactions made by other administrators in all configuration modes or created by internal processes.

1.41.2   Command Mode

1.41.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.41.4   Default

None

1.41.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show transaction command to display information about outstanding configuration database transactions made by other administrators in all configuration modes, or created by internal processes. Outstanding transactions are those that have been configured by other administrators or started by an internal process, but have not yet been committed to the configuration database. Table 11 lists the possible states that might be displayed for a transaction.

Table 11    Transaction States

State

Description

Active

Transaction is active for configuration changes.

Ready

Transaction just got the lock it was waiting for and is ready to proceed.

Blocked

Transaction is blocked waiting for a lock. The information field displays the transaction ID that holds the lock.

Blocked on User

Transaction is blocked by administrator input on whether to continue waiting for the lock to clear. The information field displays the transaction ID that holds the lock.

Pending Rollback

Administrator has requested to stop waiting for the lock and the system is preparing to rollback the current command.

Abort

Transaction is being erased.

Committing

Transaction is marked for commit.

Commit - Duplicated

Transaction is duplicated to the standby controller card. (1)

Commit - Duplicated

Transaction is duplicated to the standby controller card.

Commit - Synched

Transaction is committed on the standby controller card.(2)

Commit - Synched

Transaction is committed on the standby controller card.

Committed

Transaction has completed the committing on the active controller card.

Commit - Blocked

Commit is held up because of a global database lock. Waiting to commit after the lock is clear.

Waiting to Commit

Transaction has been time committed. It will be committed at a certain time. The information field displays the time until the commit.

Invalid

Transaction is invalid.

(1)  The SmartEdge 100 router has a single controller card. The Commit-Duplicated and Commit-Synched transaction states apply only to SmartEdge routers with dual controller cards.

(2)  The SmartEdge 100 router has a single controller card. The Commit-Duplicated and Commit-Synched transaction states apply only to SmartEdge routers with dual controller cards.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.41.6   Examples

The following example shows the outstanding database transactions created, but not committed, by the admin, admin1, and admin2 administrators:

[local]Redback>show transaction
TID       State                Sequence       State Information

          User                 Comment

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1037      Blocked              73544          Waiting on TID 1035

          admin1               adding circuit under port 1

1035      Active               3634           None

          admin1               changing port 1

1032      Commit - Duplicated  564654         None

          admin1

1026      Waiting to Commit    2343564        Committing in 25 min

          admin                adding admin2 at midnight

1022      Active               565            None

          admin              

1011      Abort                84454          None

          admin                deleting admin2

1.42   show tunnel

To show information about Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) tunnels the syntax is:

show tunnel gre [name tunl-name | peer peer-name | remote remote-IP] [detail]

To show information about IP-in-IP tunnels the syntax is:

show tunnel ipip [name tunl-name | remote remote-IP] [detail]

To show information about automatic IP Version 6 (IPv6) tunnels the syntax is:

show tunnel ipv6-auto [name tunl-name | remote remote-IP] [detail]

To show information about manual IPv6 tunnels the syntax is:

show tunnel ipv6-manual [name tunl-name | remote remote-IP] [detail]

1.42.1   Purpose

Displays information about tunnels currently configured in the SmartEdge system.

1.42.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.42.3   Syntax Description

gre

Displays information for GRE tunnels.

ipip

Displays information for IP-in-IP tunnels

ipv6-auto

Displays information for automatic IPv6 tunnels.

ipv6-manual

Displays information for manual IPv6 tunnels.

name tunl-name

Optional. The name of the tunnel for which information is displayed.

peer peer-name

Optional. The name of the GRE peer for which information is displayed.

remote remote-IP

Optional. The IP address of the remote interface to a tunnel for which information is displayed.

detail

Optional. Specifies the output provides fullest details.

1.42.4   Default

When the tunnel type is specifed, but the name, remote address. and peer name are not specified, all tunnels of that type are displayed.

1.42.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show tunnel command to display information about tunnels currently configured in the SmartEdge system. Use the show tunnel client command on Section 1.43 to find information about dynamic tunnel clients that are registered with the tunnel manager.

The following fields can appear in the output of the show tunnel command.

Table 12    Fields Descriptions for the show tunnel Command

Field

Description

Name

Name of the tunnel.

Context

Context in which the tunnel was created.

Type

IPv6-auto, IPv6-manual, IP-in-IP, or GRE tunnel.

MTU

MTU of tunnel.

Local IP

Local IP address of the tunnel.

Remote IP

Remote IP address of the tunnel.

State

The tunnel states can be:

  • Shut—Tunnel is disabled by the shutdown command (in GRE peer configuration mode).

  • Up—Tunnel can send and receive traffic.

  • Down—Tunnel cannot send and receive traffic.(1)

Bound to

Interface and context to which tunnel circuit is bound.

(1)  If the GRE tunnel has no circuits configured, the state is always down, even after you have entered the no shutdown command (in GRE peer configuration mode).

Use the uptime keyword to display the amount of time the tunnel circuit is in the Up state.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.42.6   Examples

(Example 1) The following example shows how to display information for the GRE peer named toBoston:

[local]Redback>show tunnel gre peer toBoston
Name            Context     Type       MTU       Local-IP        Remote-IP   State

toBoston        local       gre        1468      11.1.1.1        11.1.1.1    Down

(Example 2) The following example shows how to display detailed information information for the toChicago GRE tunnel in the local context:

[local]Redback>show tunnel name gre toChicago detail



::::: Tunnel : toChicago

   Key       : -

   Remote IP : 2.2.2.2     Local IP    : 192.168.1.5

   Tnl Type  : GRE

   State     : Down        Bound to    :

   Circuit ID: 1           Internal Hdl: 255/4:1023:63/0/1/1

   Tunnel is User Configured

   local-ip 192.168.1.5, context-for-local-ip: local

   mtu 1468

   log-state-changes no

  clear-df no

  Keep-alive 0 seconds, retries 0

   destination DOWN on nhop mgmt interface

   resolved on  grid 0x10000000

   Tunnel ID: gre 1

   Circuit ID Internal: 255/4:1023:63/0/1/1

1.43   show tunnel client

show tunnel client client-name [context ctx-name] [detail]

1.43.1   Purpose

Displays information about dynamic tunnel clients that are registered with the tunnel manager.

1.43.2   Command Mode

1.43.3   Syntax Description

client-name

Name of client.

context ctx-name

Optional. Name of context.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information about dynamic tunnel clients that are registered with the tunnel manager.

1.43.4   Default

When entered without any optional syntax, the show tunnel client command displays all dynamic tunnel clients that are registered with the tunnel manager.

1.43.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show tunnel client command to information about dynamic tunnel clients registered with the tunnel manager.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.43.6   Examples

The following example shows how to display information about all dynamic tunnel clients that are registered with the tunnel manager in all contexts:

[local]Redback>show tunnel client 

Tunnel client information summary

---------------------------------------------------------

Client Name       : mobile-ip  (client-id 2 

Context Name      : local

IPIP Tunnel Count : 0  

GRE Tunnel Count  : 0

Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive

---------------------------------------------------------

Client Name       : mobile-ip  (client-id 2)

Context Name      : fa-ctx

IPIP Tunnel Count : 0                  GRE Tunnel Count : 0

Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive

The following example shows how to display information about dynamic tunnel client named mobile-ip in all contexts that it has registered with tunnel manager:

[local]Redback>show tunnel client mobile-ip

Tunnel client information summary

---------------------------------------------------------

Client Name       : mobile-ip  (client-id 2)

Context Name      : local

IPIP Tunnel Count : 0                  GRE Tunnel Count : 0

Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive

---------------------------------------------------------

Client Name       : mobile-ip  (client-id 2)

Context Name      : fa-ctx

IPIP Tunnel Count : 0                  GRE Tunnel Count : 0

Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive

The following example shows how to display information about dynamic tunnel client named mobile-ip, that is registered with the tunnel manager in the fa-ctx context:

[local]Redback>show tunnel client mobile-ip context fa-ctx

Tunnel client information summary 
---------------------------------------------------------

Client Name       : mobile-ip          (client-id 2)

Context Name      : fa-ctx

IPIP Tunnel Count : 0                  GRE Tunnel Count : 0

Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive

The following example shows how to display detailed information tunnel information about all dynamic tunnel clients that are registered with the tunnel manager in all contexts:

[local]Redback>show tunnel client detail

Tunnel client detailed information 
--------------------------------------------------------- 
Client Name       : mobile-ip         (client-id 2) 
Context Name      : local 
IPIP Tunnel Count : 0                  GRE Tunnel Count : 0 
Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive 
Counters 
Registration requests received       :   1 
Deregistration requests received     :   0 
Reregistration requests received     :   0 
Tunnel add requests received         :   0 
Tunnel delete requests received      :   0 
Tunnel modify requests received      :   0 
Tunnel verify requests received      :   0 
Tunnel registration responses sent   :   0 
Client information responses sent    :   0 
Tunnel verification responses sent   :   0 
Failed to get state - no client      :   0 
Invalid config requests received     :   0 
Reg info req rcvd no client          :   0 
Client free fail bad client id       :   0 
Client add fail-bad client id        :   0 
Client add fail-no memory            :   0 
Client add fail-due to tree insert   :   0 
Client add fail-no id available      :   0 
Client add fail-duplicate insert     :   0 
Reg resp not sent not registered     :   0 
Reg resp not sent no memory          :   0 
Client info not sent-not registered  :   0 
Client info not sent-no memory       :   0 
Client IPC xmit queue count          :   0 
--------------------------------------------------------- 
Client Name       : mobile-ip   (client-id 2)
Context Name      : fa-ctx
IPIP Tunnel Count : 0                  GRE Tunnel Count : 0
Register State    : Registered         Restart State    : Alive
Counters
Registration requests received       :   1
Deregistration requests received     :   0
Reregistration requests received     :   0
Tunnel add requests received         :   0
Tunnel delete requests received      :   0
Tunnel modify requests received      :   0
Tunnel verify requests received      :   0
Tunnel registration responses sent   :   0
Client information responses sent    :   0
Tunnel verification responses sent   :   0
Failed to get state - no client      :   0
Invalid config requests received     :   0
Reg info req rcvd no client          :   0
Client free fail bad client id       :   0
Client add fail-bad client id        :   0
Client add fail-no memory            :   0
Client add fail-due to tree insert   :   0
Client add fail-no id available      :   0
Client add fail-duplicate insert     :   0
Reg resp not sent not registered     :   0
Reg resp not sent no memory          :   0
Client info not sent-not registered  :   0
Client info not sent-no memory       :   0
Client IPC xmit queue count          :   0

1.44   show udp

show udp {sockets | statistics}

1.44.1   Purpose

Displays User Datagram Protocol (UDP) socket and statistical information.

1.44.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.44.3   Syntax Description

sockets

Displays UDP socket information.

statistics

Displays UDP statistics.

1.44.4   Default

None

1.44.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show udp command to display UDP socket and statistical information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.44.6   Examples

The following example displays output when the statistics keyword is specified:

[local]Redback>show udp statistics
udp:

        95808 datagrams received

        0 with incomplete header

        0 with bad data length field

        0 with bad checksum

        875 dropped due to no socket

        94931 broadcast/multicast datagrams dropped due to no socket

        0 dropped due to full socket buffers

        2 delivered

        875 PCB hash misses

        875 datagrams output

The following example displays output when the sockets keyword is specified:

[local]Redback>show udp sockets
Active Internet connections (including servers)

PCB      Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address         Foreign Address

f07cbb80      0      0 127.0.0.1.64721       *.* vc	f07cb958      0      0 127.0.0.1.64741       *.*

f07cb8a0      0      0 127.0.0.1.64746       *.*

f07cbcf0      0      0 127.0.0.1.64773       *.*

f07cb730      0      0 127.0.0.1.64790       *.*

f07cbc38      0      0 127.0.0.1.64876       *.*

f07cba6c      0      0 127.0.0.1.123         *.*

f07cb7e8      0      0 127.0.0.1.64914       *.*

f07cb78c      0      0 127.0.0.1.64915       *.*

f07cb6d4      0      0 127.0.0.1.64917       *.*

f07cb678      0      0 127.0.0.1.64918       *.*

f07cbbdc      0      0 127.0.0.1.64919       *.*

f07cbe60      0      0 127.0.0.1.64920       *.*

f07cbf18      0      0 127.0.0.1.64921       *.*

f07cbf74      0      0 127.0.0.1.64922       *.*

f07cbebc      0      0 127.0.0.1.6000        *.*

1.45   show version

show version

1.45.1   Purpose

Displays the current version of the software running on the system.

1.45.2   Command Mode

1.45.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.45.4   Default

None

1.45.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show version command to display the current version of the software running on the system.

For the SmartEdge 100 router with one or both ATM OC media interface cards (MICs), the command output includes, at or near its end, several lines dedicated to the MICs.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.45.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show version command:

[local]Redback>show version
Redback Networks SmartEdge OS Version SEOS-5.0.5-Release

Built by sysbuild@@lx-lsf159Fri Jan 27 01:30:02 PST 2006

Copyright (C) 1998-2006, Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

System Bootstrap version is PowerPC,1.0b1267

Installed minikernel version is 20

Router Up Time -   22 hours 1 minute 18 secs

The following example displays output from the show version command for a SmartEdge 100 router with one ATM OC3 MIC installed in slot 2. The MIC manufacturing information in the next line gives the Redback copyright notice:

[local]Redback#show version 



Redback Networks SmartEdge OS Version SEOS-7.0.0.0-Release 

Built by sysbuildd@lx-lsf401 Wed Nov 22 10:05:57 PST 2006 

Copyright (C) 1998-2006,Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

System Bootstrap version is PowerPC,rev2.0.1.2 Installed minikernel version is 2.6 

... 

Linecard 2 MIC _mic_ sarc Version SEOS-7.0.0.0-Release 

Built by  sysbuildd@lx-lsf401 Wed Nov 22 10:21:45 PST 2006 

Copyright (C) 1998-2006,Redback Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

Router Up Time - 3 minutes 42 secs 

1.46   show vpls

show vpls [bridge-name] [detail]

1.46.1   Purpose

Displays Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS)-enabled bridge information.

1.46.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.46.3   Syntax Description

bridge-name

Optional. Name of the VPLS-enabled bridge instance name. Displays information for the specified bridge instance.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.46.4   Default

None

1.46.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show vpls command to display VPLS-enabled bridge information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.46.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show vpls command:

[local]Redback>show vpls
VPLS Bridge          Pseudo-wire ID       Peers(Up)  State

BridgeName           1                    1(1 )      Enable

The following example displays output from the show vpls detail command:

[local]Redback>show vpls detail



VPLS instance name           : vplsA

 Context name                : local

 Admin state                 : Enable

 Bridge identifier           : 0x1

 Context identifier          : 0x40080001

 Default PW-identifier       : <none>

 Number of peers             : 1 (Up:1, hub:1, spoke:0)

 Number of standby peers     : 1 (local PE-rs) 0 (local MTU-s)

1.47   show vpls peer

To display Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) peer information for a specific bridge, the syntax is:

show vpls bridge-name peer [ip-addr | profile prof-name | pw-id pw-num | pw-name pw-name] [detail]

To display VPLS peer information for all bridges, the syntax is:

show vpls peer ip-addr {pw-id pw-num | pw-name pw-name} [detail]

1.47.1   Purpose

Displays VPLS peer information.

1.47.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.47.3   Syntax Description

bridge-name

VPLS-enabled bridge instance name. Displays information for the VPLS peers on the specified bridge instance.

ip-addr

VPLS peer IP address in the form A.B.C.D. Displays information for the specified VPLS peer. Optional when displaying peer information for a specific bridge.

profile prof-name

VPLS profile name. Displays information for the VPLS peers in the specified VPLS profile. Optional when displaying peer information for a specific bridge.

pw-id pw-num

Pseudo-wire number. Displays information for the VPLS peers that use the specified pseudo-wire number. Optional when displaying peer information for a specific bridge.

pw-name pw-name

Pseudo-wire name. Displays information for the VPLS peers that use the specified pseudo-wire name. Optional when displaying peer information for a specific bridge.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.47.4   Default

None

1.47.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show vpls peer command to display VPLS peer information.

When the root command is used without any additional syntax, information for all the VPLS peer instances is displayed. If additional syntax is used to match a single VPLS peer instance, then the detailed version of the output is displayed. If additional syntax is used to help filter the set of VPLS peers, then the brief version of the output is displayed.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

Table 13 describes the show vpls peer command output fields.

Table 13    Field Descriptions for the show vpls peer Command

Field

Description

Admin state

Computed administrative state for the peer:

  • disable—Peer is administratively disabled. This is the case when either the VPLS instance is administratively disabled or if the clear vpls peer disable command (in exec mode) was issued.

  • enable—Peer is administratively enabled.

Bridge id

System-generated bridge ID.

Circ cfg changes

Circuit configuration change count.

Circ delete cnt

Circuit delete count.

Circ error cnt

Circuit error count.

Circ up/down cnt

Circuit up and down count.

Circuit ID

Circuit ID, represented as VPLS circuit-id, which is used by a peer in the system. A circuit is allocated for each peer, except standby peers. A standby peer uses the circuit associated with the primary peer on switchover.

Context id

Context ID.

Context name

Name of the context in which VPLS is configured.

Last error

Last error logged by the system:

  • error—An error occurred in the previous event handling.

  • no error—No error occurred in the previous event handling.

  • pw-exists—Pseudo-wire already associated with another peer.

  • pw-create-err—Error during pseudo-wire creation.

  • pw-alloc-err—Error during allocation of resources for pseudo-wire.

  • no-primary—Primary peer does not exist.

  • no-peid—Internal ID allocated for a provider edge (PE) router is missing (in the process restart case).

  • cct-alloc-err—Error during allocation of a circuit for the peer.

  • ism-err—Error when registering a circuit with the system.

  • clear—Previous operation was a clear command.

  • admin-down—Previous operation administratively disabled a peer.

  • stby-cfg-incomp—Standby peer configuration was incomplete for hierarchical VPLS (HVPLS).

  • switchover-err—Error during switchover between primary and standby pseudo-wires.

MAC flush received

MAC flush received count.

MAC flush sent

MAC flush sent count.

Oper State/State

Operational state of the peer:

  • Deleted—Peer has been deleted, but pending clean up of the entry.

  • Disable—Peer is administratively disabled, either by disabling the VPLS instance or issuing the clear vpls peer disable command (in exec mode). The peer retains its allocated circuit ID, if it is not a standby peer. When a peer is in this state, a standby peer is activated for it, if configured.

  • Down—Peer is operationally down. The peer is waiting for a pseudo-wire to be established.

  • Init—Peer is initializing. It remains in this state if any basic resources can not be allocated, including a circuit.

  • Standby—Peer is ready as a standby peer. A peer in this state has a pseudo-wire established and is on standby. If the primary peer goes down, then the standby peer is ready to take over, without any disruptions by using the same circuit as the primary peer and the same set of learned entries mapped to the new pseudo-wire.

  • Up—Peer is operationally active. The pseudo-wire established for the peer is participating in data forwarding.

PE local mode

Local mode of operation for the neighbor connection:

  • MTU-s—Multitenant unit switch. This local mode is used when the local router is participating in hierarchical VPLS by using a pseudo-wire connected to a core provider edge router (PE-rs) device, and when the local VPLS instance does not have a mesh of pseudo-wire to all the core PE devices.

  • PE-rs—Provider edge routers. This local mode is used at a core VPLS PE device that is providing hierarchical VPLS connectivity to other MTU-s routers.

PE peering Type/Type

VPLS peering type:

  • Hub—Hub peering indicates that two PE routers are participating a full mesh of connections. This peering constitutes one of the connections of this mesh.

  • Sp—Spoke connection at a PE-rs. This peer is connected to an MTU-s to provide a hierarchical VPLS functionality. This peer may be a standby link (PE-rs is not explicitly aware).

  • Sp Pri—Spoke connection at an MTU-s connecting to a primary PE-rs for providing hierarchical VPLS functionality.

  • Sp Sby—Spoke connection at an MTU-s connecting to a secondary or standby PE-rs for providing hierarchical VPLS functionality.

This field describes the configuration, and not necessarily the operation state.

Peer config changes

Peer configuration change count.

Peer flags

Run-time bit flags maintained by a peer to capture the state as it understands it:

  • active—Peer is operationally active. This flag is set when the peer is operational. When primary and standby peers are configured, only one of them can be active at the same time.

  • debug—A peer is marked for debug logging. This flag is set using the debug vpls peer command (in exec mode) to log all events related to this peer.

  • delete—A peer is marked for deletion. This flag is set if either the VPLS instance or bridge instance is deleted, an applied profile is removed for the VPLS instance, or a PE entry in the profile is removed. In all such configuration changes, a peer is marked for deletion using this flag and an event is queued for processing.

  • disable—A peer is administratively disabled. This flag is set using the clear vpls peer disable command (in exec mode).

  • pri—Peer is configured as a primary peer. It indicates that it has a successful binding relationship with another (standby) peer. This flag is not applicable for peers that do not have a standby peer configured. This flag is not set if the standby peer or the primary peer are not successfully initialized.

  • proc-restart—Peer is recovering from a restart operation. This flag is used when the Label Manager (LM) has restarted or the controller card has switched over. The information about all active peers is recovered so that the same circuit ID and other resource IDs are used by the peer, because these resources are still active. This flag is set when the peer instance is created with the recovered information and is waiting initialization. After the initialization of the peer is complete, this flag is reset.(1)

  • pw-up—Pseudo-wire for the peer was successfully established and bidirectional label-switched paths (LSPs) exist.

  • Reset-pndg—A peer reset or restart operation is partially complete (pending). This flag is normally set if processing a reset or restart requires withdrawing a pseudo-wire label and the peer is waiting for a notification from the LM that the signaling is complete. It is used to ensure a new pseudo-wire is not signaled before the previous one was withdrawn.

  • restart—Peer restart flag. The peer is marked for restart operation and an event is queued. Either of the following conditions can mark a peer for restart: :

  • Configuration changes that require the peer to completely shut down (go back to the init state) and come back up with a new set of attributes

  • Issuing the clear vpls peer restart command (in exec mode)

  • stby—Peer is configured as a standby peer. It indicates that it has a successful binding relationship with another (primary) peer. This flag is not set if the primary peer does not exist or either of the peers were not successfully initialized.

  • tmr-restart—A delayed restart operation is scheduled for a peer. This flag is used for certain reconfiguration operations that require restarting many peers. This flag is set to indicate a delay is introduced for restarting a peer. It is cleared when processing the restart.

Peer ID

VPLS peer ID, which is the neighbor IP address.

Peer proc restarts

Peer process restart count.

Peer reset cnt

Peer reset count.

Peer restart cnt

Peer restart count.

Peer state changes

Peer state change count.

Peer up/down cnt

Peer up and down count.

Prev event

Previous peer flag event:

  • admin-enable—Peer administratively enabled.

  • admin-disable—Peer administratively disabled.

  • init—Peer initialized.

  • delete—Peer deleted.

  • reset—Peer reset (operational state changed to down and then back to up).

  • activate—Peer activated to assume operational role.

  • cct-cfg-change—Circuit attributes changed.

  • pw-up—Pseudo-wire associated with the peer is up.

  • pw-down—Pseudo-wire associated with the peer is down.

Prev state

Previous operational state:

  • Deleted—Peer has been deleted, but pending clean up of the entry.

  • Disable—Peer is administratively disabled, either by disabling the VPLS instance or issuing the clear vpls peer disable command (in exec mode). The peer retains its allocated circuit ID if it is not a standby peer. When a peer is in this state, a standby peer is activated for it, if configured.

  • Down—Peer is operationally down. The peer is waiting for a pseudo-wire to be established.

  • Init—Peer is initializing. It remains in this state if any basic resources can not be allocated, including a circuit.

  • Standby—Peer is ready as a standby peer. A peer in this state has a pseudo-wire established and is on standby. If the primary peer goes down, the standby peer is ready to take over, without any disruptions, by using the same circuit as the primary peer and the same set of learned entries mapped to the new pseudo-wire.

  • Up—Peer is operationally active. The pseudo-wire established for the peer is participating in data forwarding.

Primary PE

Primary neighbor’s IP address.

Primary PE state

Primary neighbor’s operational state. For more information about the values for this field, see the Prev State field.

Profile name

VPLS profile name.

Pseudo-wire ID

Pseudo-wire ID. The ID can be the pseudo-wire name or number.

PW encap type

Pseudo-wire encapsulation type:

  • Ethernet—Ethernet encapsulation.

  • VLAN—Ethernet VLAN encapsulation.

PW error cnt

Pseudo-wire error count.

PW exp bits

Pseudo-wire EXP bits.

PW flags

Run-time bit flags maintained by a peer for a pseudo-wire:

  • in-rib—Route entry is associated with this pseudo-wire.

  • delete-sig—Received a pseudo-wire delete message from the remote PE device.

  • delete-cfg—Local request to remove the pseudo-wire association.

  • in-lblmap—LFIB entry is associated with this pseudo-wire.

  • update—Received a pseudo-wire update.

  • up—Pseudo-wire state is up.

  • in-ldp—Pseudo-wire was signaled using LDP.

  • from-ldp—Received LDP message for this pseudo-wire association.

  • from-cfg—Received local request from this pseudo-wire association.

  • ldp-stale—Previous LDP request for the pseudo-wire is stale.

  • exp-set—Pseudo-wire is transporting EXP bits.

  • peer-up—VPLS peer state is up.

  • remote-encap—Pseudo-wire encapsulation signaled by the remote PE device.

  • local-cbit—Control word flag signaled by the remote PE device.

  • remote-cbit—Control word flag signaled by the remote PE device.

PW In label

MPLS label used for packets received over the pseudo-wire.

PW local MTU

Pseudo-wire local MTU.

PW Out label

MPLS label used for packets transmitted over the pseudo-wire.

PW remote MTU

Pseudo-wire remote MTU.

PW restart cnt

Pseudo-wire restart count.

PW state

Pseudo-wire state:

  • Down—Pseudo-wire is down.

  • Up—Pseudo-wire is established, but not used.

  • Up, Active—Pseudo-wire is up and is in service.

PW up/down cnt

Pseudo-wire up and down count.

Standby PE

Standby neighbor’s IP address.

Standby PE state

Standby neighbor’s operational state. For more information about the values for this field, see the Prev State field.

VPLS Bridge

VPLS bridge name.

VPLS peer

VPLS peer is uniquely identified by the following three values:

  • Bridge name

  • Peer ID (neighbor IP address)

  • Pseudo-wire ID (name or number)

(1)  If the process restart occurred when a standby peer was operational, then the states for the primary and standby peers are recovered.

1.47.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show vpls peer command:

[local]Redback>show vpls peer

VPLS Bridge          Peer ID         Pseudo-wire ID  Circuit ID  Type     State

corpA                22.22.22.22     100             VPLS 3      Hub      Up

corpA                33.33.33.33     100             VPLS 4      Hub      Up 

corpA                55.55.55.55     100             VPLS 6      Sp       Up

The following example displays output from the show vpls peer command:

[local]Redback>show vpls peer detail



VPLS peer (bridge/ip:pwid):  vplsA/22.22.22.22:10

 Oper State         : Up                     Context name      : local

 Admin State        : Enable                 Circuit id        : VPLS 3

 Peer Flags         : active, pw-up

 Bridge id          : 0x1                    Context id        : 0x40080001

 PE peering type    : Hub                    PE local mode     : PE-rs

 Prev state         : Down                   Profile name      : forvplsA

 Prev event         : pw-up                  Last error        : no error

 PW state           : Up, Active

 PW up/down cnt     : 1

 PW error cn        : 0                      PW restart cnt    : 1

 PW In label        : 131072                 PW encap type     : Ethernet

 PW Out label       : 131072                 PW Exp bits       : 0x0

 PW local MTU       : 1500                   PW remote MTU     : 1500

 PW flags           : in-rib, in-lblmap, in-ldp, from-ldp, from-cfg,

                      ism-up, peer-up 

The following example displays output from the show vpls peer command when primary and standby neighbors are configured:

[local]Redback>show vpls peer



VPLS Bridge          Peer ID         Pseudo-wire ID  Circuit ID  Type     State

corpA-MTU            11.11.11.11     100             VPLS 3      Sp Pri   Up

corpA-MTU            33.33.33.33     100             VPLS 3      Sp Sby   Stby

The following example displays output from the show vpls peer detail command when primary and standby neighbors are configured:

[local]Redback>show vpls peer detail



VPLS peer (bridge/ip:pwid):  corpA-MTU/11.11.11.11:100

 Oper State          : Up             Context name        : local

 Admin State         : Enable         Circuit id          : VPLS 1

 Peer Flags          : pri, active, pw-up

 Bridge id           : 0x1            Context id          : 0x40080001

 PE peering type     : Spoke          PE local mode       : MTU-s

 Standby PE          : 33.33.33.33    Standby PE state    : Stby

 Prev state          : Down           Profile name        : p1

 Prev event          : cct-cfg-change Last error          : no error

 Peer up/down cnt    : 1              Peer state changes  : 2

 Peer reset cnt      : 0              Peer config changes : 0

 Peer restart cnt    : 0              Peer proc restarts  : 0

 MAC flush sent      : 0              MAC flush received  : 0

 Circ up/down cnt    : 0              Circ cfg changes    : 2

 Circ error cnt      : 0              Circ delete cnt     : 0

 PW state            : Up, Active

 PW up/down cnt      : 1

 PW error cnt        : 0              PW restart cnt      : 1

 PW In label         : 131072         PW encap type       : Ethernet

 PW Out label        : 131072         PW Exp bits         : 0x0

 PW local MTU        : 1500           PW remote MTU       : 1500

 PW flags  : in-rib, in-lblmap, in-ldp, from-ldp, from-cfg

             peer-up

 

VPLS peer (bridge/ip:pwid):  corpA-MTU/33.33.33.33:100

 Oper State          : Stby           Context name        : local

 Admin State         : Enable         Circuit id          : VPLS 1

 Peer Flags          : stby, pw-up

 Bridge id           : 0x1            Context id          : 0x40080001

 PE peering type     : Spoke          PE local mode       : MTU-s

 Primary PE          : 11.11.11.11    Primary PE state    : Up

 Prev state          : Down           Profile name        : p1

 Prev event          : pw-up          Last error          : no error

 Peer up/down cnt    : 0              Peer state changes  : 2

 Peer reset cnt      : 0              Peer config changes : 0

 Peer restart cnt    : 0              Peer proc restarts  : 0

 MAC flush sent      : 0              MAC flush received  : 0

 Circ up/down cnt    : 0              Circ cfg changes    : 0

 Circ error cnt      : 0              Circ delete cnt     : 0

 PW state            : Down, Standby, In-active

 PW up/down cnt      : 1

 PW error cnt        : 0              PW restart cnt      : 1

 PW In label         : 131073         PW encap type       : Ethernet

 PW Out label        : 131072         PW Exp bits         : 0x0

 PW local MTU        : 1500           PW remote MTU       : 1500

 PW flags  : in-lblmap, in-ldp, from-ldp, from-cfg

             peer-up

1.48   show vpls profile

show vpls profile [prof-name [pe ip-addr]] [detail]

1.48.1   Purpose

Displays Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) profile information.

1.48.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.48.3   Syntax Description

prof-name

Optional. VPLS profile name. Displays information for the specified VPLS profile.

pe ip-addr

Optional. VPLS neighbor IP address in the form A.B.C.D. Displays VPLS profile information for the specified VPLS peer.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.48.4   Default

None

1.48.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show vpls profile command to display VPLS profile information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.48.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show vpls profile command:

[local]Redback>show vpls profile
 VPLS Profile         PE ID           Bridge Profile  Type  Peers(Up)

 test                 1.2.1.1                         Hub   1  (1)

 test                 1.2.1.2                         Hub   1  (1)

The following example displays output from the show vpls profile detail command:

[local]Redback>show vpls profile detail



VPLS profile (name/pe-id) : test/1.2.1.1

 PE peering type       : Hub            PE local mode       : PE-rs

 Number of peers       : 1              Active peers        : 1

 Standby for           : none           Bridge profile      : forvplsA

 Enacp type            : Ethernet       MAC limit           : 16002

 Bcast rate-limit      : 0              Bcast burst-size    : 1

 Mcast rate-limit      : 1              Mcast burst-size    : 0

 Unknown rate-limit    : 0              Unknown burst-size  : 0

 Bridge flags          : 0x8004

1.49   show vrrp

show vrrp [debug | memory | routers [if-name | vrrp-id] | statistics [if-name | vrrp-id]]

1.49.1   Purpose

Displays Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) information.

1.49.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.49.3   Syntax Description

debug

Optional. Displays debug options and filters.

memory

Optional. Displays how much memory has been used.

routers

Optional. Displays state information pertaining to virtual routers.

if-name

Optional. Interface name. Displays the specified information for only the named interface.

vrrp-id

Optional. Virtual router ID. The range of values is 1 to 255. Displays the specified information for only the VRRP ID indicated.

statistics

Optional. Displays VRRP statistics.

1.49.4   Default

When entered without specifying any options, this command displays all VRRP statistics information.

1.49.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show vrrp command to display VRRP information. Router and statistics information may be limited to virtual routers on a single interface or a single virtual router on a single interface.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.49.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show vrrp command:

[local]Redback>show vrrp
  --- VRRP Virtual Router vrrp1/2 (Backup) ---



State             : Backup            Last Event        : Interface Up

Priority          : 100               Advertise Int     : 22

Last Adv Source   : 0.0.0.0           Up Time           : 5d 05:24:04

Preempt           : No                Master Down Int   : 66

Skew Time (u-sec) : 218750

Auth Type:        : None              Key Chain         :

Address List:

1.1.1.1



  --- VRRP Virtual Router vrrp1/3 (Backup) ---



State             : Init              Last Event        : None

Priority          : 100               Advertise Int     : 1

Last Adv Source   : 0.0.0.0           Up Time           : N/A

Preempt           : No                Master Down Int   : 3

Skew Time (u-sec) : 609375

Auth Type:        : None              Key Chain         :

Address List:

2.2.2.2

The following example displays output from the show vrrp statistics command:

[local]Redback>show vrrp statistics
  --- VRRP Global Statistics ---



Virtual Routers   : 3                 Interfaces        : 1

Packets Sent      : 0                 Packets Received  : 0

Packet Dropped    : 0                 No Router Errors  : 0

Checksum Errors   : 0                 Version Errors    : 0



  --- VRRP Virtual Router vrrp1/1 (Backup) ---



Master Transitions: 0

Advertisement Recv: 0                 Advertisement Sent: 0

Priority 0 Recv   : 0                 Priority 0 Sent   : 0

Bad Type Errors   : 0                 Wrong Owner Errors: 0

IP TTL Error      : 0                 Pkt Length Errors : 0

Interval Errors   : 0                 Address Errors    : 0

Auth Type Errors  : 0                 Auth Mismatchs    : 0

Auth Failures     : 0                 Auth Header Errors: 0





  --- VRRP Virtual Router vrrp1/2 (Backup) ---



Master Transitions: 0

Advertisement Recv: 0                 Advertisement Sent: 0

Priority 0 Recv   : 0                 Priority 0 Sent   : 0

Bad Type Errors   : 0                 Wrong Owner Errors: 0

IP TTL Error      : 0                 Pkt Length Errors : 0

Interval Errors   : 0                 Address Errors    : 0

Auth Type Errors  : 0                 Auth Mismatchs    : 0

Auth Failures     : 0                 Auth Header Errors: 0



  --- VRRP Virtual Router vrrp1/3 (Backup) ---



Master Transitions: 0

Advertisement Recv: 0                 Advertisement Sent: 0

Priority 0 Recv   : 0                 Priority 0 Sent   : 0

Bad Type Errors   : 0                 Wrong Owner Errors: 0

IP TTL Error      : 0                 Pkt Length Errors : 0

Interval Errors   : 0                 Address Errors    : 0

Auth Type Errors  : 0                 Auth Mismatchs    : 0

Auth Failures     : 0                 Auth Header Errors: 0

1.50   show xc l2vpn

show xc l2vpn [[slot/port] circuit-id | group {group-name | default} | lg id lg-name-in | ldp} | peer peer-addr| route | static] [detail] | [summary]]

1.50.1   Purpose

Displays Layer 2 Virtual Private Network (L2VPN) cross-connect information.

1.50.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.50.3   Syntax Description

circuit-id

Optional. Layer 2 (L2) circuit ID. Depending on the type of circuit being cross-connected, the L2 circuit ID takes one of the following constructs:

  • vpi-vci vpi vci—ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC). Specifies the virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual channel identifier (VCI). The range of values for the vpi and vci arguments are 0 to 255, and 1 to 65,535 respectively.

  • vpi-vci vpi start-vci through end-vci—Range of ATM PVCs. Specifies the VPI and the range of VCIs. The range of values for the vpi argument is 0 to 255; the range of values for the start-vci and end-vci arguments is 1 to 65,535.

  • vlan-id pvc-vlan-id—Virtual LAN (VLAN) 802.1Q PVC that is not within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the PVC VLAN tag. The range of values for the pvc-vlan-id argument is 1 to 4,095.

  • vlan-id start-pvc-vlan-id through end-pvc-vlan-id—Range of VLAN 802.1Q PVCs that are not within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the range of PVC VLAN tags. The range of values for the start-pvc-vlan-id and end-pvc-vlan-id arguments is 1 to 4,095.

  • vlan-id tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id—VLAN 802.1Q PVC that is within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the VLAN tag for the tunnel followed by the PVC VLAN tag. The range of values for the tunl-vlan-id and pvc-vlan-id arguments is 1 to 4,095.

  • vlan-id tunl-vlan-id:start-pvc-vlan-id through end-pvc-vlan-id—Range of VLAN 802.1Q PVCs that are within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the VLAN tag for the tunnel followed by the range of PVC VLAN tags. The range of values for the tunl-vlan-id, start-pvc-vlan-id, and end-pvc-vlan-id arguments is 1 to 4,095.

  • dlci dlci—Data-link connection identifier (DLCI) for the Frame Relay PVC. The range of values for the dlci argument is 16 to 991.

For Ethernet ports with no 802.1Q PVCs, no circuit descriptor is specified.

circuit-id

Optional. Layer 2 (L2) circuit ID. Depending on the type of circuit being cross-connected, the L2 circuit ID takes one of the following constructs:

  • vlan-id pvc-vlan-id—Virtual LAN (VLAN) 802.1Q PVC that is not within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the PVC VLAN tag. The range of values for the pvc-vlan-id argument is 1 to 4,095.

  • vlan-id start-pvc-vlan-id through end-pvc-vlan-id—Range of VLAN 802.1Q PVCs that are not within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the range of PVC VLAN tags. The range of values for the start-pvc-vlan-id and end-pvc-vlan-id arguments is 1 to 4,095.

  • vlan-id tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id—VLAN 802.1Q PVC that is within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the VLAN tag for the tunnel followed by the PVC VLAN tag. The range of values for the tunl-vlan-id and pvc-vlan-id arguments is 1 to 4,095.

  • vlan-id tunl-vlan-id:start-pvc-vlan-id through end-pvc-vlan-id—Range of VLAN 802.1Q PVCs that are within an 802.1Q tunnel. Specifies the VLAN tag for the tunnel followed by the range of PVC VLAN tags. The range of values for the tunl-vlan-id, start-pvc-vlan-id, and end-pvc-vlan-id arguments is 1 to 4,095.

For Ethernet ports with no 802.1Q PVCs, no circuit descriptor is specified.

group

Optional. Displays cross-connection information only for a specific cross-connection group.

group-name

Cross-connection group name.

default

Displays cross-connection information only for the default cross-connection group.

lg id lg-name-in

Specifies the name of an access link group to be cross-connected inbound

ldp

Optional. Displays only Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) L2VPN cross-connection information.

peer peer-addr

IP address of the remote peer provider edge (PE) router.

static

Optional. Displays only static L2VPN cross-connection information.

route

Displays L2VPN route information.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed L2VPN cross-connection information. When used with the xc-circuit argument, displays detailed L2VPN cross-connection information only for the specified cross-connected circuit.

summary

Displays summary L2VPN information.

1.50.4   Default

None.

1.50.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show xc l2vpn command to display L2VPN-related information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.50.6   Examples

The following example displays information about all L2VPN cross-connections that are configured on the current router:

[local]Redback# show xc l2vpn


Static L2VPN Circuits

L2 Circuit                     L2 State Peer address    Label

10/1 vlan-id 1                 Up       1.1.1.2         4097

10/1 vlan-id 2                 Up       1.1.1.2         4098

10/1 vlan-id 3                 Up       1.1.1.2         4099

10/1 vlan-id 4                 Up       1.1.1.2         4100

10/1 vlan-id 5                 Up       1.1.1.2         4101

LDP L2VPN Circuits

L2 Circuit                     L2 State Peer address    VC Id    L-Label  

State


VPLS 0x4000002                 Up       83.1.1.1        10       131073   Down

VPLS 0x4000003                 Up       111.111.111.111 10       131074   Down

4/1 vpi-vci 1 100              Up       111.111.111.111 10000    131075   Down

The following example shows how to display L2VPN route information:

[local]Redback>show xc l2vpn route

L2 Circuit               XC Circuit               Next-hop       Uptime

10/1:1023:63/1/2/4099    255/12:2:63/0/1/10       1.1.1.2        01:41:59

10/1:1023:63/1/2/4100    255/12:3:63/0/1/11       1.1.1.2        01:41:59

10/1:1023:63/1/2/4101    255/12:4:63/0/1/12       1.1.1.2        01:41:58

10/1:1023:63/1/2/4102    255/12:5:63/0/1/13       1.1.1.2        01:41:58

10/1:1023:63/1/2/4103    255/12:6:63/0/1/14       1.1.1.2        01:41:37

The following example displays static L2VPN cross-connection information:

[local]RedBack#show xc l2vpn static


Static L2VPN Circuits

L2 Circuit                     L2 State Peer address    Label

10/1 vlan-id 1                 Up       1.1.1.2         4097

10/1 vlan-id 2                 Up       1.1.1.2         4098

10/1 vlan-id 3                 Up       1.1.1.2         4099

10/1 vlan-id 4                 Up       1.1.1.2         4100

10/1 vlan-id 5                 Up       1.1.1.2         4101

The following example displays detailed information about the L2VPN cross-connection configured on port 4 of the card installed in slot 1:

[local]Redback>show xc l2vpn 4/1 vpi-vci 1 100 detail


LDP L2VPN Circuit 4/1 vpi-vci 1 100

L2 State        : Up           Peer           : 111.111.111.111

VC ID           : 10000        XC state       : Down

Local Label     : 131075       Access Circuit : 4/1:1:63/1/2/4098

Remote Label    : 131072       L2VPN Circuit  : 255/12:785:63/0/1/8

EXP bits        : 0            Local Encap    : atm-cell

Remote Group ID : 0            Remote Encap   :

Local VC Type   : ATM VCC Cell Remote VC Type : ATM VCC Cell

Local VC MTU    : 4470         Remote VC MTU  : 0

XC group        : foo          Negotiated cbit  : no

Flags 0x0008014a: delete-sig, in-lblmap, in-ldp, from-cfg                 :