COMMAND DESCRIPTION     11/190 82-CRA 119 1170/1-V1 Uen D    

Commands: lj through mo

© Ericsson AB 2009–2010. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List

SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp  is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

Contents

1Command Descriptions
1.1llc-xid-processing
1.2lns card
1.3local-address
1.4local-as
1.5localdir
1.6local-mode
1.7local-name
1.8local-preference
1.9local-protection
1.10logging active
1.11logging cct-valid
1.12logging console
1.13logging debug
1.14logging file
1.15logging filter
1.16logging malicious-traffic category
1.17logging malicious-traffic file
1.18logging malicious-traffic syslog
1.19logging rate-limit
1.20logging standby
1.21logging syslog
1.22logging timestamp millisecond
1.23log-neighbor-changes
1.24log-neighbor-up-down
1.25log-lsp-up-down
1.26log-pw-up-down
1.27log-state-changes
1.28loopback (ATM, POS, Ethernet , WAN-PHY )
1.29loopback (CFM)
1.30loopback (channels)
1.31loop-detection
1.32lossless-large-mtu
1.33lsp
1.34lsp block-flooding
1.35lsp gen-interval
1.36lsp interval
1.37lsp max-lifetime
1.38lsp receive-only-mode
1.39lsp refresh-interval
1.40lsp retransmit-interval
1.41mac-address (ATM)
1.42mac-address (DHCP)
1.43mac-address (Dot1Q PVC)
1.44mac-address (link group)
1.45mac-addr (pseudowire)
1.46mac-entry
1.47mac-limit
1.48mac-list
1.49mac-move-drop
1.50macro
1.51malicious-traffic
1.52maintenance-association
1.53mapping-schema
1.54mark dscp
1.55mark dscp destination
1.56mark precedence
1.57mark priority
1.58master
1.59match as-path-list
1.60match community-list
1.61match ext-community-list
1.62match ip address prefix-list
1.63match ip next-hop prefix-list
1.64match ipv6 address prefix-list
1.65match ipv6 next-hop prefix-list
1.66match metric
1.67match route-type
1.68match tag
1.69max-age
1.70max-flows-per-circuit
1.71max-groups
1.72max-hops
1.73maximum-links
1.74maximum paths (IS-IS)
1.75maximum-paths (RIP)
1.76maximum ports
1.77maximum prefix
1.78maximum redistribute (IS-IS)
1.79maximum redistribute (OSPF)
1.80maximum redistribute-quantum
1.81maximum restart-time
1.82maximum retain-time
1.83maximum update-delay
1.84max-lease-time
1.85max-pending-registrations
1.86max-session
1.87max-sessions
1.88max-tunnels
1.89mdt default-group
1.90mdt encapsulation
1.91medium (fast-ethernet)
1.92medium (ethernet)
1.93medium-type
1.94mep-local
1.95mep-remotelist
1.96mesh-group
1.97message
1.98message-reordering
1.99metric
1.100metric-style
1.101mic
1.102minimum-bandwidth
1.103minimum-links
1.104minimum receive-interval
1.105minimum transmit-interval
1.106min-wait
1.107mip
1.108mirror destination
1.109mkdir
1.110modify ip access-list
1.111modify policy access-list
1.112monitor duration
1.113monitor ip
1.114monitor isis adjacency
1.115monitor isis interfaces
1.116monitor isis statistics
1.117monitor ospf interface
1.118monitor ospf neighbor
1.119monitor ospf spf last
1.120monitor ospf statistics
1.121monitor port
1.122monitor process
1.123more
1.124mount /md
1.125move-frequency


1   Command Descriptions

Commands starting with “lj” through “mo” are included.

1.1   llc-xid-processing

llc-xid-processing

no llc-xid-processing

1.1.1   Purpose

Enables the SmartEdge® router to detect the access interface change of a mobile node (MN) based on logical link control (LLC) exchange ID (XID) messages received on a circuit.

1.1.2   Command Mode

FA configuration

1.1.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.1.4   Default

The detection of access interface changes of a MN based on LLC XID messages received on a circuit is enabled.

1.1.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the llc-xid-processing command to enable SmartEdge router to detect the access interface changes of a MN based on LLC XID messages received on a circuit.

When XID is enabled, the SmartEdge router uses the received LLC XID frame to change the access interface and circuit associated with the MN and transmits traffic to the MN over the new circuit. This feature allows for a quick traffic switchover if the relocation of an MN remains in the same FA instance.

If you disable XID, the SmartEdge router must process a Mobile IP registration message on the new interface before the MN can be moved to a new access interface.

Use the no form of this command to disable LLC XID message processing.

1.1.6   Examples

The following example shows how to disable LLC XID message processing:

[local]Redback(config)#context fa

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router mobile-ip

[local]Redback(config-mip)#foreign-agent

[local]Redback(config-mip-fa)#no llc-xid-processing

1.2   lns card

lns card {selection {route | priority} | slot preference preference}

{no | default} lns card {selection | slot}

1.2.1   Purpose

Configures slot redundancy for Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) sessions.

1.2.2   Command Mode

L2TP peer configuration

1.2.3   Syntax Description

selection

Selects the algorithm by which a traffic card is selected for an L2TP session.

route

Specifies the route algorithm; this is the default.

priority

Specifies the priority algorithm.

slot

Chassis slot number of a traffic card on which L2TP sessions are to be carried.

preference preference

Relative preference of one traffic card over another as the choice for an L2TP session; the default value is equal preference for all traffic cards.

1.2.4   Default

The default algorithm is route, and if multiple traffic cards are available, sessions are load balanced between them (equal preference for all cards).

1.2.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lns card command to configure slot redundancy for L2TP sessions between the SmartEdge router and an L2TP access concentrator (LAC). You enter this command to first select the algorithm by which a traffic card is selected to carry L2TP subscriber sessions; you enter it again one or more times to specify the traffic cards that can carry L2TP subscriber sessions. You must specify the lns-only keyword with the function command in L2TP peer configuration mode for this peer before entering this command.

The route algorithm establishes the traffic card with the route to the LAC as the preferred traffic card without explicitly specifying it. This algorithm allows you to establish the preference of one traffic card over all others when its slot is not known. The priority algorithm fixes the traffic card preferences based on an explicit configuration statement. If you specify the priority keyword, you must identify all the traffic cards on which L2TP sessions are to be carried.

The values that you specify for the preference argument are relative to each other and can be any integer: a smaller number has a higher preference. Cards with equal preference numbers are load balanced.

You must configure the traffic cards using the card command (in global configuration mode) prior to configuring slot redundancy for them. Sessions are not assigned to unconfigured traffic cards.

To display the status of slot redundancy, use the show l2tp global command in any mode with the ipc keyword.

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default algorithm and traffic card preferences.

Note:  
The maximum number of sessions that a traffic card can carry is not configurable and depends on the amount of memory in each traffic card.

1.2.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable slot redundancy by load balancing the sessions between the traffic cards in slots 10 and 11, using the priority algorithm and equal preferences:

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card selection priority

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card 10 preference 10

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card 11 preference 10

The following example shows how to enable slot redundancy using the route algorithm; the traffic card with the route to a LAC is the preferred traffic card, and then, when that traffic card reaches its maximum number of circuits, sessions are apportioned between the traffic cards in slots 1, 2, and 3, with card 1 having the highest preference and card 3 having the lowest preference. The traffic card with the route, whatever its slot, always has the highest priority:

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card selection route

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card 1 preference 10

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card 2 preference 20

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#lns card 3 preference 30

1.3   local-address

local-address if-name [ctx-name]

no local-address if-name [ctx-name]

1.3.1   Purpose

Specifies the interface for the home agent (HA) local address used by remote foreign agent (FA) peers for this HA instance.

1.3.2   Command Mode

HA configuration

1.3.3   Syntax Description

if-name

Name of the interface for the HA.

ctx-name

Optional. Context name in which the interface exists. If the interface exists in a context other than the one you are currently in, you must specify the context name.

1.3.4   Default

None

1.3.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the local-address command to specify the interface for the HA local address used by FA peers for this HA instance. Enter this command multiple times to specify multiple HA interfaces. This command specifies an existing interface as the HA interface; you must first create that interface using the interface command in context configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to remove the HA local address.

1.3.6   Examples

The following example shows how to create the local address interface in a context called ha and specify it as the local address interface for the HA instance:

[local]Redback(config)#context ha

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface ha

[local]Redback(config-if)#ip address 10.1.1.2/16

[local]Redback(config-if)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router mobile-ip

[local]Redback(config-mip)#home-agent

[local]Redback(config-ha)#local-address ha

1.4   local-as

local-as {asn | nn:nn}

no local-as {asn | nn:nn}

1.4.1   Purpose

Configures the autonomous system number (ASN) that the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routing process uses to peer with the specified external BGP (eBGP) neighbor.

1.4.2   Command Mode

BGP neighbor configuration

1.4.3   Syntax Description

asn

ASN in integer format. The range of values is 1 to 65,535. The subrange 64,512 to 65,535 is reserved for private autonomous systems.

nn:nn

ASN in 4-byte integer format, where the first nn indicates the two higher-order bytes and the second nn denotes the two lower-order bytes.

1.4.4   Default

None

1.4.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the local-as command to specify the ASN that the BGP routing process uses to peer with the specified eBGP neighbor. Under most circumstances, the BGP routing process peers with neighbors that use the same ASN, which is configured through the router bgp command in context configuration mode. The local-as command allows the configuration of a different ASN to be used with the specified eBGP neighbor.

Use the no form of this command to remove the local ASN.

1.4.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure an ASN of 100 for the SmartEdge router. The SmartEdge router peers with the neighbors at IP address, 102.210.210.1, and IP address, 103.220.220.3, using ASN 100. However, it peers with the neighbor at IP address, 68.68.68.68, using ASN 200:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 102.210.210.1 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#remote-as 500

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#address-family ipv4 unicast

[local]Redback(config-bgp-peer-af)#exit

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#exit

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 103.220.220.3 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#remote-as 500

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#address-family ipv4 unicast

[local]Redback(config-bgp-peer-af)#exit

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#exit

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 68.68.68.68 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#remote-as 400

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#local-as 200

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#address-family ipv4 unicast

1.5   localdir

localdir dir-name

no localdir dir-name

1.5.1   Purpose

Specifies the local directory on the SmartEdge router where bulkstats data for this policy is stored.

1.5.2   Command Mode

bulkstats configuration

1.5.3   Syntax Description

dir-name

Local directory where bulkstats collection files for this policy are stored.

1.5.4   Default

None

1.5.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the localdir command to specify the local directory where bulkstats collection files for this policy are stored.

You must first create a local directory using the mkdir command (in exec mode) before you enable bulkstats collection. For more information on the mkdir command, see the Command List. You can specify a directory on the local file system (/flash) or the mass-storage device (/md). (The mass-storage device is preferable due to its faster write speed.) You can limit the space allowed for bulkstats storage with the limit command.

You cannot change the local directory while bulkstats collection is enabled; you must first disable bulkstats collection for this policy using the collection command in bulkstats configuration mode and then reenable bulkstats collection after entering the localdir command.

Use the no form of this command to remove the configuration of the current local directory used to store bulkstats data for this policy. You should disable bulkstats collection for the policy using the collection command in bulkstats configuration mode before you delete the configuration.

1.5.6   Examples

The following example shows how to store bulkstats collection files for the policy, bulk, in the /md/blksts directory:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bulkstats policy bulk

[local]Redback(config-bulkstats)#localdir /md/blksts

1.6   local-mode

local-mode {mtu-s | pe-rs}

{no | default} local-mode

1.6.1   Purpose

Sets the local mode of operation for the neighbor connection.

1.6.2   Command Mode

VPLS profile neighbor configuration

1.6.3   Syntax Description

mtu-s

Sets the local mode to multi-tenant unit switch (MTU-s). This mode is used when the local router is participating in hierarchical Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) by using a pseudowire connected to a core provider edge routers (PE-rs) device, and when the local VPLS instance does not have a mesh of pseudowire to all the core PE devices.

pe-rs

Sets the local mode to PE-rs. This mode is used at a core VPLS PE device that is providing hierarchical VPLS connectivity to other MTU-s routers.

1.6.4   Default

The PE-rs mode is set.

1.6.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the local-mode command to set the local mode of operation for the neighbor connection. This command applies only if a spoke connection type is configured for the neighbor. With a spoke connection type, one end of the connection must be set to MTU-s mode and the other must be set to PE-rs mode.

Note:  
For proper VPLS operation, ensure that the local mode at both ends is set correctly.

Use the no or default form of this command to return the local mode of operation to PE-rs.

1.6.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the local mode to mtu-s:

[local]Redback#config

[local]Redback(config)#vpls profile foo

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile)#neighbor 10.10.10.1

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile-neighbor)#local-mode mtu-s

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile-neighbor)#

1.7   local-name

local-name local-name

{no | default} local-name

1.7.1   Purpose

Creates a local name for the SmartEdge router, to be used in outbound Start-Control-Connection-Request (SCCRQ) or Start-Control-Connection-Reply (SCCRP) control messages to an Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) peer.

1.7.2   Command Mode

L2TP peer configuration

1.7.3   Syntax Description

local-name

Another name for the SmartEdge router to be used as the value for the Host name attribute-value pair (AVP), AVP 7, instead of the system hostname in SCCRQ or SCCRP messages to and from this L2TP peer.

1.7.4   Default

The system hostname, as specified by the system hostname command in global configuration mode, is used as the local name.

1.7.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the local-name command to create a local name for the SmartEdge router. Usually, the system hostname is used as the local name for the SmartEdge router.

You can create a different local name for the SmartEdge router for each tunnel that you configure, but the names must be unique.

The local-name argument is sent in the SCCRQ message when initializing the tunnel.

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default local name. To change a local name, create a new one and it overwrites the existing one.

1.7.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the local name, cardinal:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#l2tp-peer name peer1

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#local-name cardinal

1.8   local-preference

local-preference pref-num

no local-preference pref-num

1.8.1   Purpose

Configures the value of the local preference number, a value that is applied to Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes that do not have the local-preference attribute.

1.8.2   Command Mode

BGP router configuration

1.8.3   Syntax Description

pref-num

Local preference number. The range of values is 0 to 4,294,967,295; the default value is 100.

1.8.4   Default

The default preference is 100.

1.8.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the local-preference command to configure the value of the local preference number.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default local preference value of 100.

1.8.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the preference to 300:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#local-preference 300

1.9   local-protection

local-protection

no local-protection

1.9.1   Purpose

Permits a label-switched path (LSP) to be protected by a bypass Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) LSP.

1.9.2   Command Mode

RSVP LSP configuration

1.9.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.9.4   Default

Local protection is permitted.

1.9.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the local-protection command to permit an LSP to be protected by a bypass RSVP LSP. When configured, the LSP advertises to the ingress and transit nodes that a bypass RSVP LSP can be used to provide Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) fast reroute protection. This configuration will affect both ingress node and the transit nodes of the LSP operation.

Use the no form of this command to deny an LSP from being protected by a bypass RSVP LSP. Local protection can be denied for operational or resource issues.

1.9.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure an RSVP LSP, to-r2-core, to deny MPLS fast reroute protection:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp

[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#lsp to-r2-core

[local]Redback(config-rsvp-lsp)#no local-protection

1.10   logging active

logging active

{no | default} logging active

1.10.1   Purpose

Enables the logger to send logging and debug messages from the active controller card to the standby controller card.

1.10.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.10.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.10.4   Default

Logging and debug messages are sent to the standby controller card.

1.10.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging active command to enable the sending of logging and debug messages from the active controller card to the standby controller card.

Note:  
The SmartEdge 100 router does not support this command.

Note:  
If you do not specify the short keyword, the message is logged on the active controller card using the same severity as the original log message.

Use the no or default form of this command to disable the sending of logging and debug messages to the standby controller card.

1.10.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the sending of logging and debug messages to the standby controller card:

[local]Redback(config)#logging active

1.11   logging cct-valid

logging cct-valid

{no | default} logging cct-valid

1.11.1   Purpose

Enables the filtering of debug messages for valid circuits only.

1.11.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.11.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.11.4   Default

Filtering of logging and debug messages for circuits is disabled.

1.11.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging cct-valid command to enable the filtering of debug messages for valid circuits only.

Use the no or default form of this command to disable the filtering of debug messages by circuit.

1.11.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the filtering of debug messages for valid circuits only:

[local]Redback(config)#logging cct-valid

1.12   logging console

logging console

no logging console

1.12.1   Purpose

Enables event logging messages to the console.

1.12.2   Command Mode

Context configuration

1.12.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.12.4   Default

Console logging for contexts other than local is disabled.

1.12.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging console command (in context configuration mode) to quickly isolate problems by displaying event log messages directly to the console rather than to a file. Messages sent to the console can be further constrained by using the logging filter command in context configuration mode to establish a logging filter.

Use the no form of this command to disable event logging to the console.

1.12.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable event logging messages to the console:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging console

1.13   logging debug

logging debug [active | standby]

{no | default} logging debug [active | standby]

1.13.1   Purpose

Stores messages that have been generated by all enabled debug processes in the log buffer.

1.13.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.13.3   Syntax Description

active

Configure the system to send debug events from the active to standby XCRP

standby

Configure the system to send debug events from the standby to active XCRP

1.13.4   Default

Debugging messages are not stored in the log buffer.

1.13.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging debug command to store messages for all enabled debugging processes in the log buffer. Use the show log command in any mode to display the logged messages. Use the active keyword to configure the system to send debug events from the active to standby XCRP and the standby keyword to configure the system to send debug events from the standby to active XCRP.

The default and no forms of this command without keywords to revert to default behavior, where the system does not store debug messages in the log buffer.

After you enable the logging debug command, you can use no logging debug active or default logging debug active to stop sending debug messages from the active to standby XCRP, while still sending debug messages to the log buffer. Similarly, after you enable the logging debug command, you can use no logging debug standby or default logging debug standby to stop sending debug messages from the standby to the active XCRP, while still sending debug messages to the log buffer.

1.13.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the logging of debugging messages to the log buffer:

[local]Redback(config)#logging debug

The following example shows how to store messages for enabled debugging processes in the log buffer, send debug messages to standby to active XCRP, and stop sending debug messages from the active to standby XCRP.

[local]Redback(config)#logging debug
[local]Redback(config)#logging debug standby
[local]Redback(config)#no logging debug active

1.14   logging file

logging file [text] filename

no logging file [text] filename

1.14.1   Purpose

Enables event logging messages to a file.

1.14.2   Command Mode

Context configuration

1.14.3   Syntax Description

text

Optional. Specifies that the log file is to be saved as a text, rather than binary, file.

filename

Name of the file to which events are logged.

1.14.4   Default

If you do not use this command, events are not logged to a file. If you use this command without the optional text keyword, the file is saved in binary form.

1.14.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging file command to enable event logging messages to a file. You can also configure up to four log files per context.

Use the filename argument to specify the name and path of the logging file. If the full path is not specified, the file is saved to the /flash directory.

Use the show log command in any mode to display log files. For more information on the show log command, Command List.

Use the no form of this command to disable the enabling of event log messages to a file.

1.14.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the storing of event logs to a file, /flash/log_file:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging file /flash/log_file 

1.15   logging filter

logging filter {console | file | monitor | syslog} level

default logging filter {console | file | monitor | syslog}

1.15.1   Purpose

Isolates events based on message severity in the logs and trims the flow of information.

1.15.2   Command Mode

Context configuration

1.15.3   Syntax Description

console

Specifies the console filter type.

file

Specifies the file filter type.

monitor

Specifies the monitor filter type.

syslog

Specifies the syslog server filter type.

level

Filter logging level, according to one of the following keywords (in descending priority order):


  • emergency—Logs only emergency events.

  • alert—Logs alert and more severe events.

  • critical—Logs critical and more severe events.

  • error—Logs error and more severe events.

  • warning—Logs warning and more severe events.

  • notice—Logs notice and more severe events.

  • informational—Logs informational and more severe events.

  • debug—Logs all events, including debug events.

1.15.4   Default

The default filter levels for the console, file, monitor, and syslog keywords are set to debug.

Table 1 describes the default input and output filter levels for each filter type.

Table 1    Default Filter Levels

Input Filter

Output Filter

console

debug

monitor

debug

runtime

informational

syslog

notice

1.15.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging filter command to isolate events based on certain severities in the logs and trim the flow of information.

Use the show logging command in any mode to display the configured filter levels for the current context. For more information on the show log command, see the Command List.

Use the default form of this command to set a logging filter back to its default level.

1.15.6   Examples

The following example shows how to modify the severity level for several log facilities:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging filter monitor error

The following example shows how to modify the severity level for console:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging filter console critical

1.16   logging malicious-traffic category

logging malicious-traffic category [all | failed-reassembly | filtered | malformed-ip | malformed-layer4 | other | spoofed]

no logging malicious-traffic category [all | failed-reassembly | filtered | malformed-ip | malformed-layer4 | other | spoofed]

1.16.1   Purpose

Enable logging of a specified category of malicious traffic.

1.16.2   Command Mode

context configuration mode

1.16.3   Syntax Description

all

Log all malicious packets.

failed-reassembly

Log failed reassemble malicious packets.

filtered

Log filtered malicious packets.

malformed-ip

Log malformed IP malicious packets.

malformed-layer4

Log malformed Layer 4 malicious packets.

other

Log other malicious traffic packets.

spoofed

Log spoofed malicious packets.

1.16.4   Default

Logging of malicious traffic is disabled by default.

1.16.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging malicious-traffic category command to enable logging of a specified category of malicious traffic.

Use the no form of this command to disable logging of a specified category of malicious traffic.

For more information about malicious traffic logging, see Configuring Malicious Traffic Detection and Monitoring.

1.16.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable logging of malformed IP malicious packets:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging malicious-traffic category malformed-ip

1.17   logging malicious-traffic file

logging malicious-traffic file {filename | text filename}

no logging malicious-traffic file {filename| text filename}

1.17.1   Purpose

Enable logging of malicious traffic messages to a file.

1.17.2   Command Mode

Context configuration mode

1.17.3   Syntax Description

text

Optional. Save the log file as a text file instead of a binary file.

filename

Name of the file to which malicious traffic is logged.

1.17.4   Default

Logging of malicious traffic is disabled by default. If the file name is not specified, then the log message is saved to an in-memory circular buffer. If you use this command without the optional text keyword, the file is saved in binary format.

1.17.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging malicious-traffic file command to enable logging of malicious traffic to a local file. You can configure up to four log files for each context. Use the filename keyword to specify the name and path of the logging file. If the full path is not specified, the file is saved to the /flash directory.

Use the show malicious-traffic log command in any mode to display malicious-traffic log files.

Use the no form of this command to disable malicious traffic logging to a local file.

For more information about malicious traffic logging, see Configuring Malicious Traffic Detection and Monitoring.

1.17.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the logging of malicious traffic logs to a file named traffic_log on the /flash directory:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging malicious-traffic file /flash/maltraffic_log 

The following example shows how to enable the logging of malicious traffic logs to a local text file named mal_txt on the /md directory:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging malicious-traffic file text /md/mal_txt 

1.18   logging malicious-traffic syslog

logging malicious-traffic syslog { [ip-address| ip-address facility sys-facility-name] }

no logging malicious-traffic syslog ip-address

1.18.1   Purpose

Enables logging of malicious traffic messages to a remote syslog server.

1.18.2   Command Mode

context configuration mode

1.18.3   Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address of the syslog server.

facility sys-facility-name

Optional. Specify the syslog logging facility. The range of values is local0 to local7; the default value is local7.

1.18.4   Default

Logging of malicious traffic messages to a remote syslog server is disabled by default.

1.18.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging malicious-traffic syslog command to enable logging of malicious traffic messages to a remote syslog server that is reachable within the context. The remote syslog server is identified by its IP address. You can configure up to four syslog servers per context.

Use the no form of this command to disable logging of malicious traffic messages to a remote syslog server.

For more information about malicious traffic logging, see Configuring Malicious Traffic Detection and Monitoring.

1.18.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable logging of malicious traffic to a remote syslog server at IP address 10.10.7.7 in the ABC context:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#context ABC logging malicious-traffic syslog 10.10.7.7

The following example shows how to enable logging of malicious traffic to a remote syslog server using a nondefault syslog facility:

[local]Redback(config)#context ABC 
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging malicious-traffic syslog 1.2.3.4 local1

1.19   logging rate-limit

logging rate-limit rate-limit burst burst-limit

{no | default} logging rate-limit

1.19.1   Purpose

Specifies the rate and burst limits for malicious traffic log events.

1.19.2   Command Mode

malicious-traffic configuration mode

1.19.3   Syntax Description

rate-limit

Maximum rate in packets per second (pps) at which the packets can be received. The range of values is 20 to 1,000.

burst burst-limit

Maximum number of packets that can be received during a short burst. The range of values is 20 to 10,000.

1.19.4   Default

The default value for both rate and burst limits is 100.

1.19.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging rate-limit command to specify the rate and burst limits for malicious traffic log events. The specified rate and burst values are distributed evenly across all of the active PPA2 and PPA3 cards. The actual rate limit per active card is obtained by dividing the configured rate limit by the total number of active PPA2 and PPA3 cards. The same calculation applies to obtaining the actual burst limit for each active PPA2 or PPA3 card.

Use the no form of this command to disable or remove the rate limit for malicious traffic log events. Use the default form of this command to return to the default rate of 100 pps and burst limit of 100.

For more information about malicious traffic logging, see Configuring Malicious Traffic Detection and Monitoring.

1.19.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify a rate limit of 500 and a burst limit of 300 for malicious traffic log events.

[local]Redback(config-malicious-traffic)#logging rate-limit 500 burst 300

1.20   logging standby

logging standby [short]

{no | default} logging standby short

1.20.1   Purpose

Enables the logger to send logging and debug messages from the standby controller card to the active controller card.

1.20.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.20.3   Syntax Description

short

Optional. Logs a message on the active controller card using a shorter, less verbose form when a message is sent from the standby controller card to the active controller card.

1.20.4   Default

Logging and debug messages are sent from the standby controller card to the active controller card.

1.20.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging standby command to enable the sending of logging and debug messages from the standby controller card to the active controller card.

Use the short keyword to display a message on the active controller card using a shorter, less verbose form.

Note:  
The SmartEdge 100 router does not support this command.

Note:  
If you do not specify the short keyword, the message is logged on the active controller card using the same severity as the original log message.

Use the no or default form of this command to disable the sending of logging and debug messages from the standby controller card to the active controller card.

1.20.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the sending of logging and debug messages to the standby controller card:

[local]Redback(config)#logging standby

1.21   logging syslog

logging syslog ip-addr [facility sys-fac-name]

no logging syslog ip-addr

1.21.1   Purpose

Enables the logging of system events to a remote syslog server that is reachable within the context.

1.21.2   Command Mode

Context configuration

1.21.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

IP address of the syslog server.

facility sys-fac-name

Optional. System logging facility. The range of values is local0 to local6; the default value is local6.

1.21.4   Default

System events logging is disabled.

1.21.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging syslog command to enable the logging of system events to a remote syslog server that is reachable within the context. The remote syslog server is identified by its IP address. You can also configure up to four syslog servers per context.

Use the no form of this command to disable the logging of system events to a remote syslog server.

1.21.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable logging to a remote syslog server at IP address, 10.10.3.46, in the newworld context:

[local]Redback(config)#context newworld

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging syslog 10.10.3.46

The following example shows a configuration using a non-default syslog facility:

[local]Redback(config)#context gretzky 

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging syslog 1.2.3.4 local4

1.22   logging timestamp millisecond

logging timestamp millisecond

{no | default} logging timestamp millisecond

1.22.1   Purpose

Enables the display of logged system event messages with a millisecond resolution timestamp.

1.22.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.22.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.22.4   Default

Millisecond resolution is disabled and is not displayed.

1.22.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the logging timestamp millisecond command to enable the display of logged system event messages with a millisecond resolution timestamp.

Use the no or default form of this command to disable the display of logged system event messages with millisecond resolution.

1.22.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the display of logged system event messages with millisecond resolution:

[local]Redback(config)#logging timestamp millisecond

The following example displays system event log messages when millisecond resolution is enabled:

Oct 21 03:44:47.697: [0001]: %ISIS-7-ADJ: sent PTPT IIH on inter-ctx intf black 
Oct 21 03:44:48.610: [0002]: %ISIS-7-ADJ:
 rcvd L2 LAN IIH from 001e.1000.0002 seq 16835 on inter-ctxintf bluefoo

1.23   log-neighbor-changes

log-neighbor-changes

no log-neighbor-changes

1.23.1   Purpose

Configures the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routing process to log BGP neighbor resets.

1.23.2   Command Mode

BGP router configuration

1.23.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.23.4   Default

BGP neighbor resets are logged.

1.23.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the log-neighbor-changes command to configure the BGP routing process to log BGP neighbor resets. Frequent resets could indicate excessive packet loss or other network problems.

Use the no form of this command to ensure that resets are not logged.

1.23.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the BGP routing process so that BGP neighbor resets are not logged:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#no log-neighbor-changes 

1.24   log-neighbor-up-down

log-neighbor-up-down

no log-neighbor-up-down

1.24.1   Purpose

Logs an informational message when a neighbor transitions to or from the full adjacency state.

1.24.2   Command Mode

1.24.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.24.4   Default

Transitions are not logged.

1.24.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the log-neighbor-up-down command to log an informational message when a neighbor transitions to or from the full adjacency state.

Use the no form of this command to disable the logging of messages for neighbor transition events.

1.24.6   Examples

The following example shows how to log neighbor transitions:

[local]Redback(config-ospf)#log-neighbor-up-down

1.25   log-lsp-up-down

log-lsp-up-down

no log-lsp-up-down

1.25.1   Purpose

Enables the logging of RSVP-INFO messages when any Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) label-switched path (LSP) changes state.

1.25.2   Command Mode

RSVP router configuration

1.25.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.25.4   Default

RSVP-INFO messages are not logged.

1.25.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the log-lsp-up-down command to enable the logging of RSVP-INFO messages when any RSVP LSP changes state. The state can change from Up to Down, or from Down to Up.

Note:  
The generation of RSVP-INFO messages cannot be disabled using the no terminal monitor command.

Use the no form of this command to disable the logging of RSVP-INFO messages.

1.25.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable logging of RSVP-INFO messages when any RSVP LSP changes state:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp

[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#log-lsp-up-down

1.26   log-pw-up-down

log-pw-up-down

no log-pw-up-down

1.26.1   Purpose

Logs the state of any XCs that have the specified L2VPN profile attached.

1.26.2   Command Mode

L2VPN profile peer configuration

1.26.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.26.4   Default

The state of an XC is not logged.

1.26.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the log-pw-up-down command to log the state of any XCs that have the specified L2VPN profile attached.

A log is created each time an XC transitions to the down, up, and standby states. The logs are saved in the ex syslog file or in a user-specified log file.

Use the no form of this command to disable the state logging for any XCs attached to the specified L2VPN profile.

1.26.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable state logging for any XCs that have the L2VPN profile called profile1 attached:

[local]Redback(config)#l2vpn profile profile1
[local]Redback(config-l2vpn-xc-profile)#peer 100.100.100.1
[local]Redback(config-l2vpn-xc-profile-peer)#log-pw-up-down

1.27   log-state-changes

log-state-changes

no log-state-changes

1.27.1   Purpose

Enables the generation of a TUNNEL-INFO or GRE-INFO message each time the tunnel changes state (from up to down or down to up).

1.27.2   Command Mode

Tunnel configuration

1.27.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.27.4   Default

The generation of TUNNEL-INFO messages is disabled.

1.27.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the log-state-changes command to enable the generation of a message each time the tunnel changes state (from up to down or down to up).

Enables the generation of a TUNNEL-INFO or GRE-INFO message each time the tunnel changes state (from up to down or down to up).

To display the TUNNEL-INFO or GRE-INFO messages, enter the show log command (in any mode).

Note:  
You cannot disable the generation of TUNNEL-INFO or GRE-INFO messages with the no terminal monitor command (in exec mode).

Use the no form of this command to disable the generation of TUNNEL-INFO or GRE-INFO messages.

1.27.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the generation of a TUNNEL-INFO message each time the overlay tunnel, DenverTn1, in the local context changes state:

[local]Redback(config)#tunnel ipv6v4-manual DenverTnl
[local]Redback(config-tunnel)#log-state-changes

1.28   loopback (ATM, POS, Ethernet, WAN-PHY)

For an Ethernet port (not in WAN-PHY operating mode, the syntax in port configuration mode is:

loopback

no loopback

For a WAN-PHY Ethernet port, the syntax in port configuration mode is:

loopback {internal | line}

no loopback

For an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) DS-3 port, the syntax in ATM DS-3 configuration mode is:

loopback {line | local | payload | remote}

no loopback {line | local | payload | remote}

For a port on a 4-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c traffic card or an ATM OC MIC, the syntax in ATM OC configuration mode is:

loopback {internal | line | payload}

no loopback

For a port on any other ATM OC traffic card or a Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) port, the syntax in ATM OC or port configuration mode is:

loopback {internal | line}

no loopback

1.28.1   Purpose

Changes the operation of an ATM DS-3, ATM OC, Ethernet, WAN-PHY, or POS port to a loopback state.

1.28.2   Command Mode

1.28.3   Syntax Description

internal

Tests the internal functions of an ATM OC, POS, or WAN-PHY port by looping the transmit line to the receive line.


The internal keyword for all ATM OC, POS, or WAN-PHY ports (with the exception of a port on a second-generation ATM OC traffic card) causes all transmitted traffic to be looped back and not sent to the remote site; instead, the remote site receives a loss of signal (LOS). For a port on a second-generation ATM OC traffic card, the port software injects an alarm indication signal-line (AIS-L) and then resumes transmitting traffic.

line

Tests the line operation of an ATM DS-3, ATM OC, POS, or WAN-PHY port by looping the receive line to the transmit line.

local

Tests the internal functions on an ATM DS-3 port by looping the transmit line to the receive line.

payload

Indicates that when the DS-3 frame on an ATM DS-3 port, or the SDH or SONET payload on a port on a 4-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c traffic card or 2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC, is received and the frame or payload is extracted, it is to be reframed and returned.

remote

Verifies remote link connectivity and quality at the DS-3 signal level for an ATM DS-3 port. This option is available only if its admin state is up.

1.28.4   Default

Port operation is in a normal state.

1.28.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the loopback command to change the operation of a port or channel to a loopback state.

Use the show port detail command (in any mode) to display the administrative state of the port. The Admin state field must be up to verify the remote link connectivity and quality with the remote keyword.

Use the no form of this command to restore the port operation to a normal state.

1.28.6   Examples

The following example shows how to change the port operation of an ATM OC port to loop transmitted frames back to the receive line:

[local]Redback(config)#port atm 3/1
[local]Redback(config-atm-oc)#loopback internal

The following example shows how to change the port operation of an Ethernet port to a loopback state:

[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 5/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#loopback

1.29   loopback (CFM)

loopback

{no | default} loopback

1.29.1   Purpose

The no and default forms of this command specify that the maintenance points in the current maintenance domain (MD) not respond to loopback messages (LBMs).

1.29.2   Command Mode

CFM configuration

1.29.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.29.4   Default

Maintenance points respond to LBMs, unless disabled by this command.

1.29.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the no loopback or default loopback command to specify that the maintenance points in the current MD do not respond to LBM.

The no loopback or default loopback commands allow a MEP to initiate loopback messages and respond only to messages it initiates.

Use the loopback command to enable responses.

1.29.6   Examples

In the following example, the no loopback command disables responses to LBMs in the sbc CFM instance (sbc.com maintenance domain):

[local]Redback(config)#ethernet-cfm instance-1
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#level 4
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#no loopback

1.30   loopback (channels)

For a DS-1 channel, the syntax in DS-1 configuration mode is:

loopback {network net-type | remote rem-type}

no loopback

For a DS-3 channel or port, the syntax in DS-3 configuration mode is:

loopback {line | local | remote}

no loopback

For a clear-channel E3 port, the syntax in E3 configuration mode is:

loopback {line | local}

no loopback

For an E1 channel or port, the syntax in E1 configuration mode is:

loopback {line | local}

no loopback

For a channelized OC-12 or STM-1 port, the syntax in port or STM-1 configuration mode is:

loopback {internal | line}

no loopback

1.30.1   Purpose

Changes the operation of a DS-1 channel, DS-3 channel or port, E3 port, E1 channel or port, or channelized OC-12 or STM-1 port to a loopback state.

1.30.2   Command Mode

1.30.3   Syntax Description

internal

Tests the internal functions of the port by looping the transmit line to the receive line.

line

Tests the line operation of the channel or port by looping receive line to the transmit line.

local

Tests the internal functions of the channel or port by looping the transmit line to the receive line.

remote

Verifies remote link connectivity and quality of the DS-3 channel or port at the DS-3 signal level. This option is available only if the DS-3 channel or port has C-bit framing and its admin state is up.

network net-type

Type of loopback state for the DS-1 channel, according to one of the following keywords:


  • line—Specifies a full loopback (all bits) from the receive line to the transmit line.

  • payload—Specifies a payload loopback from the receive line to the transmit line.


In either case, the DS-0 time slots (for DS-0 channels) on a DS-1 channel must be set to the default (1–24).

remote rem-type

Type of loopback state for the far end equipment, according to one of the following keywords:


  • line fdl ansi—Specifies a facility data link (FDL) ANSI loopback. The DS-1 channel must have Extended Superframe Format (ESF) framing.

  • line fdl bellcore—Specifies an FDL Bellcore loopback. The DS-1 channel must have ESF framing.

  • line inband—Specifies an inband loopback. This option is compatible with either ESF or Superframe Format (SF) framing. This option is available only if the admin state of the DS-1 channel is up.

  • payload—Specifies a payload loopback. This option is compatible only with ESF framing.

1.30.4   Default

Port or channel operation is in a normal state.

1.30.5   Usage Guidelines

When you use the loopback command to change the operation of a DS-1 channel to a loopback state, follow these guidelines:

When you use the loopback command to change the operation of a channelized or clear-channel DS-3 channel or port or E3 port to a loopback state, follow these guidelines:

When you use the loopback command to change the operation of an E1 channel or port to a loopback state, follow these guidelines:

When you use the loopback command to change the operation of a channelized OC-12 or STM-1 port to a loopback state, follow these guidelines:

Use the no form of this command to restore the port or channel operation to a normal state.

Note:  
This command is also described in Configuring ATM, Ethernet, and POS Ports for Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) OC ports.

1.30.6   Examples

The following example shows how to change the channel operation of a DS-1 channel to a loopback state to verify remote link connectivity:

[local]Redback(config)#port ds1 3/1:1

[local]Redback(config-ds1)#loopback remote

The following example shows how to change the channel operation of a DS-3 channel 1 to a loopback state to verify remote link connectivity:

[local]Redback(config)#port ds3 3/1:1

[local]Redback(config-ds3)#loopback remote

The following example shows how to test the internal functions of port 1 on the channelized E1 traffic card in slot 1 by looping the transmit line to the receive line:

[local]Redback(config)#port e1 1/1

[local]Redback(config-e1)#loopback line

The following example shows how to test the line operation of the channelized STM-1 port 1 on the E1 traffic card in slot 1 by looping the receive line to the transmit line:

[local]Redback(config)#port channelized-stm1 1/1

[local]Redback(config-stm1)#loopback line

1.31   loop-detection

In bridge configuration mode, enables loop detection and blocking based on MAC moves:

loop-detection

no loop-detection

In bridge profile configuration mode, enables configuration of loop detection priority applied to a circuit, port, or pseudowire:

loop-detection

{no | default} loop-detection

1.31.1   Purpose

In bridge configuration mode, enables or disables loop detection and blocking based on MAC moves. In bridge profile configuration mode, enables or disables configuration of loop detection priority applied to a circuit, port, pseudowire, or link group.

1.31.2   Command Mode

1.31.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.31.4   Default

In bridge configuration mode, detection of bridging loops using the MAC moves process is disabled. In bridge profile configuration mode, loop detection circuit priority is disabled.

1.31.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the loop-detection command (in bridge configuration mode) to enable loop detection based on MAC moves. Use the loop-detection command (in bridge profile configuration mode) to enable loop detection circuit priority.

This command does not interfere with the spanning-tree process of detecting bridging loops.

1.31.6   Examples

The following example shows how the loop-detection command (in bridge configuration mode) enables loop detection, and sets the loop detection interval attribute to 10 seconds:

[local]Redback(config)#context ink
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bridge lbdl
[local]Redback(config-bridge)#loop-detection
[local]Redback(config-ld)#interval 10

In the following example, the loop-detection command (in bridge profile configuration mode) is used to enable setting the loop-detection priority for circuits associated with the bridge profile (plow) to the value 2:

[local]Redback(config)#bridge profile plow
[local]Redback(config-bridge-profile)#loop-detection
[local]Redback(config-bridge-profile-ld)#priority 2

1.32   lossless-large-mtu

lossless-large-mtu port-group {[n1] [n2]...[n8] | all}

{no | default} lossless-large-mtu

1.32.1   Purpose

Enables guaranteed lossless flow control for jumbo frames (packet sizes 1,519 to 9,600 bytes) and specifies the port groups for which this capability is enabled.

1.32.2   Command Mode

Card configuration

1.32.3   Syntax Description

port-group

Specifies that individual port groups are to be enabled for guaranteed lossless flow control.

[n1] [n2]... [n8]

Optional. Port groups that this command enables for guaranteed lossless flow control. Enter one or more port groups, numbered from 1 to 8, space separated.

all

Specifies that all port groups on this traffic card are to be enabled for guaranteed lossless flow control.

1.32.4   Default

Guaranteed lossless flow control is not enabled for any port group.

1.32.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lossless-large-mtu command to enable guaranteed lossless flow control for jumbo packets (packet sizes 1,519 to 9,600 bytes) and specify the port groups for which this capability is enabled. This command is available for Fast Ethernet-Gigabit Ethernet (FE-GE) 10/100 ports only.

Note:  
The GE ports on an FE-GE traffic card support lossless flow control for jumbo frames (packet sizes 1,519 to 9,600 bytes) without the use of this command.

FE ports are organized into port groups; each group has either six or eight member ports. When you configure a port group for guaranteed lossless flow control, two of the member ports are enabled; these ports are guaranteed to support lossless flow control for maximum transmission unit (MTU) sizes up to 9,600 bytes. The other ports in the group are shut down.

FE ports in groups that are not explicitly enabled by this command also support lossless flow control but only for oversized frames (MTU sizes to up to 2,000 bytes). You can specify larger MTUs (up to 9,600 bytes) for these ports, but lossless flow control is not guaranteed.

Use the all keyword to enable all port groups for guaranteed lossless flow control.


 Caution! 
Risk of data loss. This command causes the FE-GE traffic card to reload. To reduce the risk, do not enter this command when the ports on the card are active.
Note:  
If you enter this command more than once, each succeeding entry overwrites the data you previously entered. For example, if you have configured one or more port groups for lossless flow control and later configure other port groups using this command, you must also specify all the port groups that you previously configured.

Table 2 lists the ports that are members of each port group and the ports that are enabled or shut down for lossless flow control.

Table 2    Port Groups and Their Members

Port Group

Member Ports

Ports Enabled

Ports Shut Down

1

49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56

49, 53

50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 56

2

37, 38, 39, 40, 57, 58, 59, 60

37, 57

38, 39, 40, 58, 59, 60

3

41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48

41, 45

42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48

4

25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

25, 29

26, 27, 28, 30

5

13, 14, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36

31, 35

13, 14, 32, 33, 34, 36

6

15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22

15, 19

16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22

7

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 23, 24

3, 23

1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 24

8

7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

7, 11

8, 9, 10, 12

Use the no or default form of this command to disable lossless flow control for all port groups.

1.32.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure port groups 1 and 2 for guaranteed lossless flow control. In this instance the command enables ports 49 and 53 (in group 1) and ports 37 and 57 (in group 2), and shuts down all the other ports (50 to 52, 54 to 56, 38 to 40, and 58 to 60) in those groups:

[local]Redback(config)#card fege-60-2-port 1
[local]Redback(config-card)#lossless-large-mtu port-group 1 2

1.33   lsp

lsp lsp-name [backup-for lsp-name | bypass ip-addr [node-protect-lsp-egress ip-addr]]

no lsp lsp-name [backup-for lsp-name | bypass ip-addr [node-protect-lsp-egress ip-addr]]

1.33.1   Purpose

When entered in MPLS static router configuration mode, creates a static label-switched path (LSP), and enters MPLS static LSP configuration mode.

When entered in RSVP router configuration mode, creates an Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) LSP, and enters RSVP LSP configuration mode.

1.33.2   Command Mode

1.33.3   Syntax Description

lsp-name

Name of the LSP.

backup-for lsp-name(1)

Optional. Creates a backup or backup-to-backup RSVP LSP.


You can create a backup LSP for a primary LSP, or for another backup LSP, as follows:


  • To create an LSP that backs up a primary LSP, replace the lsp-name argument with the name of the primary LSP you are creating this backup LSP for.

  • To create a backup-to backup LSP (an LSP that backs up another backup LSP), replace the lsp-name argument with the name of the primary LSP you are creating this backup LSP for. This configuration is called a backup-to-backup LSP.

bypass ip-addr

Optional. Bypass LSP for next-hop fast reroute (NFRR) link protection. The ip-addr argument is the IP address of the directly connected next-hop node being protected. This option is only available when configuring a signaled LSP in RSVP LSP configuration mode.

node-protect-lsp-egress ip-addr

Optional. Bypass LSP for NFRR node protection. The ip-addr argument specifies the egress IP address of the bypass LSP. This option is only available when configuring a signaled LSP in RSVP LSP configuration mode, and when the LSP is being configured as a bypass LSP.

(1)  This construct is only available when configuring an RSVP LSP in RSVP LSP configuration mode.


1.33.4   Default

None

1.33.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp command in MPLS static router configuration mode to create a static LSP, and enter MPLS static LSP configuration mode.

Use the lsp command in RSVP router configuration mode to create an RSVP LSP, and enter RSVP LSP configuration mode.

Use the backup-for lsp-name construct to create a backup RSVP LSP for a primary RSVP LSP, or for another backup RSVP LSP in a backup-to-backup LSP configuration. A backup RSVP LSP remains in hot standby, which means that it is always consuming resources and available for passing traffic. If RSVP signals that the primary RSVP LSP has gone down, the backup RSVP LSP immediately begins passing traffic. If that backup RSVP LSP goes down, then the RSVP LSP that backs up that backup RSVP LSP begins passing traffic.

Backup and backup-to-backup RSVP LSP tunnels are configured on a one-to-one, end-to-end path backup basis. Failover occurs in a hierarchy: if the primary LSP fails, traffic fails over to the backup LSP; if the backup LSP also fails, traffic fails over to the backup to the backup LSP. In both cases, failover is revertive: if the higher-order LSP becomes active again, traffic reverts to the higher-order LSP.

Switchover to the backup RSVP LSP occurs within 100 milliseconds (ms) after the primary LSP goes down.

The operating system also supports fast failover to a backup or backup-to-backup LSP when the ingress router fails.

Switchover to the backup LSP occurs within 100 milliseconds after one of the following errors is received by the LSP on the ingress router:

Switchover over to the backup LSP occurs within 50 ms if a link-down event at the ingress router causes a failure.

Use the bypass ip-addr construct to configure the RSVP LSP as a bypass LSP for NFRR link protection. A bypass LSP is no different from any other RSVP LSP, except that it does not carry traffic under normal conditions. It is configured to reach the next-hop router in the event of a link failure. Any type of traffic intended to use the next hop can be switched onto the bypass LSP.

Use the node-protect-lsp-egress ip-addr construct to use the bypass LSP for NFFR node protection. In the event of a link failure or a next-hop node failure, traffic is switched to the bypass LSP. If a bypass LSP is configured without enabling node protection, then the bypass LSP is used only for link protection.

Use the no form of this command to delete an LSP.

1.33.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the static LSP, sl10, to use the next-hop label-switched router (LSR), 192.168.1.24, the egress LSR, 192.168.100.2, and to set the outgoing label value to 3:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router mpls-static
[local]Redback(config-mpls-static)#lsp sl10
[local]Redback(config-mpls-static-lsp)#next-hop 192.168.1.24
[local]Redback(config-mpls-static-lsp)#egress 192.168.100.2
[local]Redback(config-mpls-static-lsp)#out-label 3

The following example configures the RSVP LSP, 12, to use the ingress LSR, 13.1.1.1, the egress LSR, 14.1.1.1, and the explicit route two as its source path:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp
[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#lsp 12
[local]Redback(config-rsvp-lsp)#ingress 13.1.1.1
[local]Redback(config-rsvp-lsp)#egress 14.1.1.2
[local]Redback(config-rsvp-lsp)#source-path two

The following example shows how to configure the RSVP LSP 12-bkup as a backup for the primary LSP 12 and the RSVP LSP 12-bkup2 as a backup for the backup RSVP LSP 12-bkup:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp
[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#lsp 12-bkup backup-for 12
[local]Redback(config-rsvp-lsp)#exit
[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#lsp 12-bkup-2 backup-for 12-bkup

The following example configures the RSVP LSP, to-r2-core, as a bypass LSP for link protection:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp
[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#lsp to-r2-core bypass 10.1.1.1
[local]Redback(config-rsvp-lsp)#egress 192.168.1.1

1.34   lsp block-flooding

lsp block-flooding [level-1 | level-2]

no lsp block-flooding [level-1 | level-2]

1.34.1   Purpose

Prevents intermediate link-state protocol data units (LSPs) from being flooded out through the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS)-enabled interface.

1.34.2   Command Mode

IS-IS interface configuration

1.34.3   Syntax Description

level-1

Optional. Enables block flooding on IS-IS level 1 routing independently.

level-2

Optional. Enables block flooding on IS-IS level 2 routing independently.

1.34.4   Default

LSPs are flooded over IS-IS-enabled interfaces. When you enter this command without specifying either level 1 or level 2 routing, LSPs are flooded on both IS-IS levels 1 and 2.

1.34.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp block-flooding command to prevent LSPs from being flooded out through the IS-IS-enabled interface. When a network topology has many redundant connections among IS-IS devices, LSPs can be flooded excessively inside the network, costing extra CPU cycles and bandwidth consumption. This feature is especially useful in a large, fully-meshed IS-IS topology.

Note:  
This command is typically used for point-to-point (P2P) IS-IS interfaces.

Note:  
Avoid blocking some LSPs completely.

Use the no form of this command to restore to the default behavior of flooding LSPs on the interface.

1.34.6   Examples

The following example shows how to block LSP flooding on level 1 only for the fa4/1 interface running the IS-IS instance ip-backbone:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#interface oc48-4/1

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#lsp block-flooding level-1

1.35   lsp gen-interval

lsp gen-interval interval [level-1 | level-2]

no lsp gen-interval

1.35.1   Purpose

Controls how frequently a link-state protocol data unit (LSP) can be regenerated with new content for the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) instance.

1.35.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.35.3   Syntax Description

interval

Frequency, in seconds, at which an LSP can be regenerated with new content. The range of values is 1 to 120; the default value is 10.

level-1

Optional. Sets the frequency at which an LSP can be regenerated for level 1 independently.

level-2

Optional. Sets the frequency at which an LSP can be regenerated for level 2 independently.

1.35.4   Default

An LSP can be regenerated every 10 seconds.

1.35.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp gen-interval command to control how frequently an LSP can be regenerated with new content for the IS-IS instance.

Decreasing the frequency at which an LSP can be regenerated with new content can stabilize a network at the cost of slower convergence. New versions of LSPs with updated content are generated less often and produce less load on the network than the load caused by flooding and route recomputation. Typically, the value set by the lsp gen-interval command should be lower than the values set through the lsp max-lifetime and lsp refresh-interval commands in IS-IS router configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

1.35.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the LSP regeneration frequency for IS-IS level-1 to 30 seconds:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#lsp gen-interval 30 level-1 

1.36   lsp interval

lsp interval interval

no lsp interval

1.36.1   Purpose

Controls the pace at which link-state protocol data unit (LSP) transmissions are flooded on the interface to Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) neighbors.

1.36.2   Command Mode

IS-IS interface configuration

1.36.3   Syntax Description

interval

Interval, in milliseconds, between successive LSPs. The range of values is 10 to 65,535; the default value is 33.

1.36.4   Default

The minimum delay time is set to 33 milliseconds.

1.36.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp interval command to control the pace at which LSPs are flooded on the interface to IS-IS neighbors. In dense-meshed IS-IS network topologies with a large number of devices and IS-IS neighbors, LSP flooding is the key scaling factor. Ensure that devices are not overloaded by LSPs from neighbors.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default, minimum delay value.

1.36.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the SmartEdge router to transmit LSPs every 100 milliseconds (10 packets per second) on the serial1/1 interface:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#interface serial1/1

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#lsp interval 100

1.37   lsp max-lifetime

lsp max-lifetime lifetime

no lsp max-lifetime

1.37.1   Purpose

Modifies the length of time that Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) link-state protocol data units (LSPs) can live on the network before timing out.

1.37.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.37.3   Syntax Description

lifetime

Maximum lifetime, in seconds, of an LSP. The range of values is 120 to 65,535; the default value is 1,200.

1.37.4   Default

The maximum lifetime of an LSP is 1,200 seconds.

1.37.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp max-lifetime command to modify the length of time LSPs can live on the network before timing out. Use this command in conjunction with the lsp refresh-interval command in the case of large networks. Longer-lived LSPs allow for less flooding and higher stability.

The value set by the lsp max-lifetime command should be at least 60 seconds more than the value set through the lsp refresh-interval command, and should also be more than the value set through the lsp gen-interval command.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default maximum lifetime value of 1,200 seconds.

1.37.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum lifetime for LSPs to 900 seconds, which is 300 seconds more than the LSP refresh interval:

[local]Redback(config-isis)#lsp refresh-interval 600

[local]Redback(config-isis)#lsp max-lifetime 900

1.38   lsp receive-only-mode

lsp receive-only-mode

no lsp receive-only-mode

1.38.1   Purpose

Prevents the specified Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) interface from forwarding link-state protocol data units (LSPs).

1.38.2   Command Mode

IS-IS interface configuration

1.38.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.38.4   Default

None

1.38.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp receive-only-mode command to prevent the specified IS-IS interface from forwarding LSPs.


 Caution! 
Risk of leaked routing information. This command is used for internal lab test situations only and is relevant only for a stub IS-IS area where the goal is to import the network routing information from the operational network without exporting lab environment routing information into the operational network. After enabling IS-IS on an interface using the interface command in IS-IS router configuration mode, a delay in entering the lsp receive-only-mode command can result in lab routing information leaking into the operational network. To reduce the risk, immediately enter the lsp receive-only-mode command after enabling IS-IS on an interface using the interface command in IS-IS router configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to reestablish forwarding of LSPs.

1.38.6   Examples

The following example show how to prevent the IS-IS interface, isis1, on a lab router from forwarding LSPs:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#interface isis1

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#lsp receive-only-mode

1.39   lsp refresh-interval

lsp refresh-interval interval

no lsp refresh-interval

1.39.1   Purpose

Controls how frequently a link-state protocol data units (LSPs) can be regenerated for the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) instance.

1.39.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.39.3   Syntax Description

interval

Frequency, in seconds, with which an LSP can be regenerated. The range of values is 30 to 65,535; the default value is 900.

1.39.4   Default

LSPs can be regenerated every 900 seconds.

1.39.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp refresh-interval command to control how frequently an LSP can be regenerated for the specified IS-IS instance.

Use this command in conjunction with the lsp max-lifetime command in the case of large networks. Longer-lived LSPs allow for less flooding and higher stability. This value should be at least 60 seconds less than the value set through the lsp max-lifetime command, and should also be less than the value set through the lsp gen-interval command. This LSP refresh interval also determines the IS-IS periodical Shortest Path First (SPF) calculations on the system.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

1.39.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the LSP refresh interval to 600 seconds, which is 300 seconds less than the maximum lifetime value:

[local]Redback(config-isis)#lsp refresh-interval 600

[local]Redback(config-isis)#lsp max-lifetime 900

1.40   lsp retransmit-interval

lsp retransmit-interval interval

no lsp retransmit-interval

1.40.1   Purpose

Configures the length of time the system should wait for an acknowledgment from the neighbor before resending Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) link-state protocol data units (LSPs).

1.40.2   Command Mode

IS-IS interface configuration

1.40.3   Syntax Description

interval

Interval, in seconds, between LSP retransmissions. The range of values is 0 to 65,535; the default value is 5.

1.40.4   Default

The retransmission interval is five seconds.

1.40.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the lsp retransmit-interval command to configure how long the system should wait for an acknowledgment from the neighbor before resending an IS-IS LSP. The number of seconds should be greater than the expected round-trip delay between any two devices on the attached network.

This command has no effect on LAN interfaces. On point-to-point links, the interval argument can be increased to enhance network stability. The retransmission interval can be larger for serial lines. More neighbors and paths over which LSPs are flooded allow for a longer interval.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default retransmission interval of five seconds.

1.40.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the pos11/1 interface to retransmit LSPs every 10 seconds:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#interface pos11/1

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#lsp retransmit-interval 10

1.41   mac-address (ATM)

mac-address mac-addr

default mac-address

1.41.1   Purpose

Assigns a medium access control (MAC) address on an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) OC or ATM DS-3 port.

1.41.2   Command Mode

1.41.3   Syntax Description

mac-addr

MAC address to be used for the port in the form hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh.

1.41.4   Default

When the ATM OC or ATM DS-3 traffic card or ATM OC MIC is inserted in the SmartEdge router, the MAC address is extracted from the EEPROM and assigned to each port on the card as sequential addresses starting with the base address for port 1.

1.41.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-address command to assign a MAC address on an ATM port.

Use the default form of this command to return the MAC address to the address that has been extracted from the EEPROM on the ATM OC or ATM DS-3 traffic card.

1.41.6   Examples

The following example shows how to assign 00:03:04:10:a4:bc as the MAC address on port 1 of the ATM DS-3 traffic card in slot 3:

[local]Redback(config)#port atm 3/1

[local]Redback(config-atm-ds3)#mac-address 00:03:04:10:a4:bc 

1.42   mac-address (DHCP)

mac-address mac-addr ip-address ip-addr

no mac-address mac-addr ip-address ip-addr

1.42.1   Purpose

Creates a static mapping between a medium access control (MAC) address and an IP address in this subnet.

1.42.2   Command Mode

DHCP subnet configuration

1.42.3   Syntax Description

mac-addr

MAC address for the subnet.

ip-address ip-addr

IP address to which the MAC address is to be mapped.

1.42.4   Default

No mapping exists between the MAC address and an IP address.

1.42.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-address command to create a static mapping between a MAC address and an IP address in this subnet.

The value for the ip-addr argument must be an IP address within this subnet, but not within any range of IP addresses that you have specified using the range command (in DHCP subnet configuration mode).

Use the no form of this command to specify the default condition.

1.42.6   Examples

The following example shows how to create a static mapping between a MAC address and an IP address:

[local]Redback(config)#context dhcp
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#dhcp server policy
[local]Redback(config-dhcp-server)#subnet 12.1.1.0/24 name sub2
[local]Redback(config-dhcp-subnet)#range 12.1.1.50 12.1.1.100
[local]Redback(config-dhcp-subnet)#mac-address 02:12:34:56:78:90 ip-address 12.1.1.10

1.43   mac-address (Dot1Q PVC)

mac-address mac-addr

{no | default} mac-address mac-addr

1.43.1   Purpose

Assigns a medium access control (MAC) address to an 802.1Q permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

1.43.2   Command Mode

dot1q PVC configuration

1.43.3   Syntax Description

mac-addr

MAC address to be used for the port in the form hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh.

1.43.4   Default

When the Gigabit or Fast Ethernet traffic card is inserted in the SmartEdge router, the MAC address is extracted from the EEPROM and assigned to each port on the Gigabit or Fast Ethernet traffic card as sequential addresses starting with the base address for port 1. Every tunnel and PVC on a port has the same default address as the port.

1.43.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-address command to assign a MAC address on a Gigabit or Fast Ethernet port.

The mac-address command is only available under the dot1q PVC configuration mode. This command is not available when configuring 802.1Q PVCs virtual LAN (VLAN) link group.

Note:  
Do not enter a point-to-multipoint MAC address. There must not be an odd number in the first byte of the mac-addr argument.

Use the no or default form of this command to return the MAC address to the MAC address of the parent circuit.

1.43.6   Examples

The following example shows how to assign 02:03:04:05:06:07 as the MAC address on an 802.1Q PVC within a tunnel on port 2 of the Gigabit or Fast Ethernet traffic card in slot 1:

[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 2/1

[local]Redback(config-port)#no shutdown

[local]Redback(config-port)#encapsulation dot1q

[local]Redback(config-port-dot1q)#dot1q pvc 2 1qtunnel

[local]Redback(config-port-dot1q)#dot1q pvc 2:1

[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#mac-address 02:03:04:05:06:07 

As a result, the port and the 802.1Q tunnel have the same default address stored in the EEPROM. Only the 802.1Q PVC has an assigned MAC address.

1.44   mac-address (link group)

mac-address {mac-addr | auto}

no mac-address [mac-addr | auto]

1.44.1   Purpose

Specifies or automatically generates a medium access control (MAC) address for the Ethernet, 802.1Q, or access link group.

1.44.2   Command Mode

Link group configuration

1.44.3   Syntax Description

mac-addr

MAC address to be used for the link group in the form hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh. Optional when using the no form of this command.

auto

Specifies that the system automatically generate a link group MAC address whenever the default MAC address is not available.

1.44.4   Default

The MAC address of a constituent FE or GE port in the link group is used as the MAC address for the link group.

1.44.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-address command to specify or automatically generate a MAC address for the Ethernet, 802.1Q, or access link group.

If the command includes the auto keyword, the link group uses the address of its constituent FE or GE port whenever it is available and automatically generates a new MAC address whenever the port address is not available, such as when the traffic card containing the port is removed.

Note:  
This command is applicable only to an Ethernet, 802.1Q, or access link group.

You must use this command to specify a MAC address when configuring an access link group.

Use the no form of this command to specify the default condition.

1.44.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify 00:00:26:26:26:26 as the MAC address for the Ethernet link group:

[local]Redback(config)#link-group lg-ether ether
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#mac-address 00:00:26:26:26:26 

1.45   mac-addr (pseudowire)

mac-addr address

no mac-addr address

1.45.1   Purpose

Sets the MAC address for the port pseudowire connection.

1.45.2   Command Mode

Port pseudowire configuration

1.45.3   Syntax Description

address

MAC address of the port pseudowire connection.

1.45.4   Default

None

1.45.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-addr command to set the MAC address of the port pseudowire connection.

Use the no form of this command to set the MAC address of the port pseudowire connection to the previously set value.

1.45.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the MAC address of the port pseudowire connection to 11:22:33:44:55:66:

[local]Redback(config-port)#mac-addr 11:22:33:44:55:66

1.46   mac-entry

mac-entry drop mac-addr

no mac-entry drop mac-addr

1.46.1   Purpose

Specifies a medium access control (MAC) address that is not allowed on this bridge.

1.46.2   Command Mode

Bridge configuration

1.46.3   Syntax Description

drop

Discards all packets on the specified MAC address.

mac-addr

MAC address that is not allowed on this bridge, in the form hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh.

1.46.4   Default

Packets with any MAC address are accepted.

1.46.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-entry command to specify a MAC address that is not allowed on this bridge. Packets with this MAC address, either as source or destination, are dropped unconditionally.

Use the no form of this command to remove the MAC address from the list of MAC addresses that are not allowed on this bridge.

1.46.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the MAC addresses that are not allowed on this bridge:

[local]Redback(config)#context bridge

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bridge isp1

[local]Redback(config-bridge)#mac-entry drop 00:0d:ab:40:8d:50

[local]Redback(config-bridge)#mac-entry drop 00:a0:a0:40:d8:60

1.47   mac-limit

mac-limit {max-num | unlimited}

{no | default} mac-limit

1.47.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum number of medium access control (MAC) addresses that can be learned by the bridge or specified manually for any port, circuit, or Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS) pseudowire circuit to which this profile is assigned.

1.47.2   Command Mode

Bridge profile configuration

1.47.3   Syntax Description

max-num

Maximum number of learned MAC addresses. The range of values is 1 to 16,000.

unlimited

Does not impose a limit to the number of learned MAC addresses.

1.47.4   Default

The maximum number of learned MAC addresses is four for a tributary circuit to which a profile is assigned. Trunk and VPLS circuits have no MAC limit.

1.47.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-limit command to specify the maximum number of MAC addresses that can be learned by the bridge or specified manually for any port, circuit, or VPLS pseudowire circuit to which this profile is assigned. For more information about VPLS pseudowire circuits, see Configuring VPLS.

MAC addresses are specified manually using the bridge mac-entry command (in ATM PVC, dot1q PVC, or port configuration mode).

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default limitation.

1.47.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify 10 as the maximum number of MAC addresses for this profile:

[local]Redback(config)#bridge profile prof-isp1

[local]Redback(config-bridge-profile)#mac-limit 10

1.48   mac-list

mac-list MAC-list-name

no mac-list MAC-list-name

1.48.1   Purpose

Creates a list of MAC addresses that can be used drop incoming packets when their source MAC address matches any entry in the MAC list.

1.48.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.48.3   Syntax Description

MAC-list-name

Name of the list of MAC addresses.

1.48.4   Default

No default

1.48.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mac-list command to create a list of MAC addresses that can be used drop incoming packets when their source MAC address matches any entry in the MAC list. The examples below show how a bridge filter with one or more MAC can be applied to an 802.1Q PVC bound to a bridge.

To configure a MAC list on an 802.1Q PVC, follow these steps:

  1. Specify the name of the MAC list and press Enter :

    mac-list MAC-list-name

  2. When you see the config-mac-list prompt, enter the first address in the MAC-list.
  3. Add or remove as many addresses as needed by repeating step 2.
  4. Include the MAC list in a bridge profile. You can include multiple MAC lists in any bridge profile.

    Use the drop source command (in bridge profile configuration mode) to include a MAC list filter in a bridge profile.

  5. Use the bridge profile command to apply the MAC lists it contains to a bridged 802.1Q PVC.

    The 802.1Q PVC must be bound to the interface of a bridge.

Use the show circuit counters detail command to show the dropped packets.

Use the show circuit counters detail command to see the dropped packets statistics. The field, MAC filter Drops, appears among the other bridge counters. It displays the count in bytes and packets.

The following restrictions apply to MAC list filters:

1.48.6   Examples

The following example illustrates how to create a MAC list named “noloops” with the mac-list command:

[local]Redback(config)#mac-list noloops
[local]Redback(config-mac-list)#11:11:11:ab:cd:cd
[local]Redback(config-mac-list)#11:13:44:ab:cd:ab
[local]Redback(config-mac-list)#end

The following example shows how to incorporate the created list in a bridge profile:

[local]Redback(config)#bridge profile mynetworkbridges
[local]Redback(config-bridge-profile)#drop source noloops
[local]Redback(config-bridge-profile)#end

The following example shows how to apply the bridge profile with the MAC list filter to a 802.1Q PVC that interfaces to a bridge where the filter is required:

[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 5/2
[local]Redback(config-port)#encapsulation dot1q
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc 5
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#bridge profile mynetworkbridges
[local]Redback(config-bridge-profile)#end

1.49   mac-move-drop

mac-move-drop

{no | default} mac-move-drop

1.49.1   Purpose

Enables the legacy method of detection of bridging loops.

1.49.2   Command Mode

Bridge configuration

1.49.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.49.4   Default

The legacy method of detecting bridging loops is enabled by default, but only if the loop detection command (in bridge configuration mode) is not enabled. When loop-detection is enabled, the legacy method is disabled.

1.49.5   Usage Guidelines

The mac-move-drop command enables the legacy method of detection of bridging loops; however, you cannot enable the legacy method if loop-detection has been enabled.

Use the no or default form of this command to disable the legacy method of detection of bridging loops.

1.49.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure a bridge to use the legacy method of detecting bridging loops:

[local]Redback(config-bridge)#mac-move-drop

1.50   macro

macro {exec | inherit | mode} macro-name

no macro {exec | inherit | mode} macro-name

1.50.1   Purpose

Defines an alias for a sequence of commands and accesses macro configuration mode.

1.50.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.50.3   Syntax Description

exec

Specifies that the macro be available in exec mode.

inherit

Specifies that the macro be available in exec mode.

mode

Configuration mode in which the macro is available. See Table 3 for exceptions.

macro-name

Name of the macro to be defined.

1.50.4   Default

No macros are defined.

1.50.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the macro command to define an alias for a sequence of commands. After entering macro configuration mode, you enter the commands to be included in the macro using the seq command (in macro configuration mode).

Table 3 lists all the mode prompts and keyword exceptions for the macro command. Except for the modes listed in Table 3, the keyword for the mode argument is the command mode prompt. For a list of all keywords, see the command-line interface (CLI) online Help.

Table 3    Mode Prompts and Keyword Exceptions for the macro Command

Mode Description

Mode Prompt

Mode Keyword

Network Address Translation (NAT) access control list

policy-acl

nat-policy-acl

NAT access control list class

policy-acl-class

nat-policy-acl-class

Use the exit command (in macro configuration mode) to complete the macro and exit to global configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to delete the macro.

1.50.6   Examples

The following example shows how to define a macro, show-port-all, to display port information:

[local]Redback(config)#macro inherit show-port-all

[local]Redback(config-macro)#seq 10 show port $1/$2

[local]Redback(config-macro)#seq 20 show circuit $1/$2

[local]Redback(config-macro)#exit

The following example displays port data for port 3 of the traffic card in slot 4 using the show-port-all macro:

[local]Redback>show-port-all 4 3

The following example defines the macro, show-all, that uses the $ character:

[local]Redback(config)#macro inherit show-all

[local]Redback(config-macro)#seq 10 show config $*

[local]Redback(config-macro)#seq 30 show circuit $*

[local]Redback(config-macro)#exit

The following example displays Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) and Frame Relay configuration and circuits using the show-all macro:

[local]Redback>show-all atm frame-relay

1.51   malicious-traffic

malicious-traffic

no malicious-traffic

1.51.1   Purpose

In global configuration mode, configures malicious traffic parameters and enters malicious-traffic configuration mode. In context configuration mode, configures malicious traffic parameters and enters malicious-traffic context configuration mode.

1.51.2   Command Mode

1.51.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.51.4   Default

None

1.51.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the malicious-traffic command in global configuration mode to configure malicious traffic parameters and enter malicious-traffic configuration mode. Use the command in context configuration mode to configure malicious-traffic parameters for the given context and enter malicious-traffic context configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command in global configuration mode to disable or remove malicious-traffic parameters. These global malicious-traffic parameters will use the default values. Use the no form of this command in context configuration mode to disable or remove malicious-traffic parameters for the given context.

For information about detecting and monitoring malicious traffic, see Configuring Malicious Traffic Detection and Monitoring.

1.51.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enter malicious-traffic configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config)#malicious-traffic

[local]Redback(config-malicious-traffic)#

The following example shows how to enter malicious-traffic context configuration mode to configure malicious traffic parameters for the context ABC:

[local]Redback(config)#context ABC
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#malicious-traffic

[local]Redback(config-ctx-malicious-traffic)#

1.52   maintenance-association

maintenance-association ma-short-name

no maintenance-association

1.52.1   Purpose

Creates a maintenance association (MA) on an Ethernet or VLAN-based circuit to verify the integrity of the circuit. If the MA already exists, the command simply enters the MA configuration mode.

1.52.2   Command Mode

CFM configuration

1.52.3   Syntax Description

ma-short-name

Specifies the name used to identify the MA to CFM users who have access to the current MD. A maximum of 43 characters are allowed for the ma-short-name argument. The total length of MD name and the ma-short-name argument must be less than or equal to 48 characters.

1.52.4   Default

No MA exists.

1.52.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maintenance-association command to create a MA on an Ethernet or VLAN-based circuit to verify the integrity of the circuit. If the MA already exists, the command simply enters the MA configuration mode.

When the MD is divided into multiple maintenance associations (MAs) (as shown level 3 in the following illustration), the maintenance association endpoints (MEPs) can be adjacent, but cannot overlap.

Each Ethernet or VLAN-based circuit is a single Ethernet Virtual Connection (EVC); that is a single customer service instance.

An MA is defined as a mesh of MEPs, each of which has a Domain Service Access Point (DSAP) to which a user can connect for CFM operations. In addition the network mesh can contain intermediate maintenance points not having DSAPs. If an intermediate maintenance point is configured to be reported in the CFM user’s domain, it is called a maintenance association intermediate point (MIP) in the MA.

The Continuity Check Message (CCM) PDU is broadcast by an MA endpoint (MEP), is used to check the continuity of the MA.

Maintenance points are ingress and egress Ethernet ports, Ethernet circuit interfaces, or interfaces to emulated Ethernet circuits. See CFM Supported Circuits in Configuring Ethernet CFM for details.

The following drawing illustrates two Operator MAs. Each MA is corresponds to separate VLAN. If the two VLANs are operated by separate companies and have DSAPs, they should be created in separate MDs. If they are supplied by the same company, they should be created in a single domain:

Figure 1   Operator MAs

1.52.6   Examples

The following example shows how to use this command to create an MA bayarea in the MD named sbc.com:

[local]Redback(config)#ethernet-cfm instance-1
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#level 4
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#domain-name sbc.com
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#disable-linktrace
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#group-mac 01:01:01:01:01:01
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#maintenance-association bayarea

1.53   mapping-schema

mapping-schema {8P0D | 7P1D | 6P2D | 5P3D}

{no | default} mapping-schema

1.53.1   Purpose

Defines the default quality of service (QoS) translation schema to use with a classification map.

1.53.2   Command Mode

Class map configuration

1.53.3   Syntax Description

8P0D

Specifies that 8P0D Ethernet Priority Code Point (PCP) encoding is the default schema. The 8P0D schema propagates the three Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) or 802.1p bits to the priority bits of the packet descriptor (PD) QoS value on ingress, and performs the reverse on egress. The PD drop-precedence bits are set to zero on ingress, and ignored on egress. For the default values for 8P0D ingress and egress mappings, see Table 4 and Table 5, respectively.

7P1D

Specifies that 7P1D Ethernet PCP is the default schema. The 7P1D schema maps between the eight possible EXP or 802.1p values and seven different PD QoS priority levels, one of which includes two levels of drop-precedence. For the default values for 7P1D ingress and egress mappings, see Table 6 and Table 7, respectively.

6P2D

Specifies that 6P2D Ethernet PCP is the default schema. The 6P2D schema maps between the eight possible EXP or 802.1p values and six different PD QoS priority levels, two of which include two levels of drop-precedence. For the default values for 6P2D ingress and egress mappings, see Table 8 and Table 9, respectively.

5P3D

Specifies that 5P3D Ethernet PCP is the default schema. The 5P3D schema maps between the eight possible EXP or 802.1p values and five different PD QoS priority levels, three of which include two levels of drop-precedence. For the default values for 5P3D ingress and egress mappings, see Table 10 and Table 11, respectively.

1.53.4   Default

Maps all entries to the default 8P0D values.

1.53.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mapping-schema command to define the default QoS translation schema to use with a classification map. This command overrides any existing configuration for the classification map.

You can use this command to specify default values for all mapping entries, then override that value for a subset of entries by entering subsequent mapping commands.

Use the no or default form of this command to revert values for all map entries to the default 8P0D values.

Table 4 lists the default values for 8P0D ingress mappings.

Table 4    8P0D Mapping, Ingress from MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

Ethernet 802.1p

MPLS EXP

PD Priority

PD Drop

IP Precedence

DSCP

7

7

0

0

7

Network Control

6

6

1

0

6

Reserved

5

5

2

0

5

cs5

4

4

3

0

4

cs4

3

3

4

0

3

cs3

2

2

5

0

2

cs2

1

1

6

0

1

cs1

0

0

7

0

0

DF

Table 5 lists the default values for 8P0D egress mappings.

Table 5    8P0D Mapping, Egress to MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

PD Priority

PD Drop

IP Precedence

DSCP

Ethernet 802.1p

MPLS EXP

0

NA

7

Network Control

7

7

1

NA

6

Reserved

6

6

2

NA

5

EF

5

5

3

NA

4

AF4[1,2,.3]

4

4

4

NA

3

AF3[1,2,3]

3

3

5

NA

2

AF2[1,2,3]

2

2

6

NA

1

AF1[1,2,3]

1

1

7

NA

0

DF

0

0

Table 6 lists the default values for 7P1D ingress mappings.

Table 6    7P1D Mapping, Ingress from MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

MPLS EXP

Ethernet 802.1p

SmartEdge PD Priority

SmartEdge PD Drop

DSCP

IP Precedence

7

7

0

0

Network Control

7

6

6

1

0

Reserved

6

5

5

3

2

AF 4[1]

4

4

4

3

6

AF 4[3]

4

3

3

4

2

AF 3[1]

3

2

2

5

2

AF2[1]

2

1

1

6

2

AF 1[1]

1

0

0

7

0

DF

0

Table 7 lists the default values for 7P1D egress mappings.

Table 7    7P1D Mapping, Egress to MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

SmartEdge PD Priority

SmartEdge PD Drop

DSCP

IP Precedence

MPLS EXP

Ethernet 802.1p

0

NA

Network Control

7

7

7

1

NA

Reserved

6

6

6

2

NA

EF

5

5

5

3

0, 1, 2

AF 4[1]

4

5

5

3

<> [0, 1, 2]

AF 4[2,3]

4

4

4

4

NA

AF3[1,2,3]

3

3

3

5

NA

AF2[1,2,3]

2

2

2

6

NA

AF1[1,2,3]

1

1

1

7

NA

DF

0

0

0

Table 8 lists the default values for 6P2D ingress mappings.

Table 8    6P2D Mapping, Ingress from MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

MPLS EXP

Ethernet 802.1p

SmartEdge PD Priority

SmartEdge PD Drop

DSCP

IP Precedence

7

7

0

0

Network Control

7

6

6

1

0

Reserved

6

5

5

3

2

AF 4[1]

4

4

4

3

6

AF 4[3]

4

3

3

5

2

AF 2[1]

2

2

2

5

6

AF 2[3]

2

1

1

6

2

AF 1[1]

1

0

0

7

0

DF

0

Table 9 lists the default values for 6P2D egress mappings.

Table 9    6P2D Mapping, Egress to MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

SmartEdge PD Priority

SmartEdge PD Drop

DSCP

IP Precedence

MPLS EXP

Ethernet 802.1p

0

NA

Network Control

7

7

7

1

NA

Reserved

6

6

6

2

NA

EF

5

5

5

3

0, 1, 2

AF 4[1]

4

5

5

3

<>[0, 1, 2]

AF 4[2,3]

4

4

4

4

0, 1, 2

AF 3[1]

3

3

3

4

<>[0, 1, 2]

AF 3[2,3]

3

2

2

5

0, 1, 2

AF 2[1]

2

3

3

5

<>[0, 1, 2]

AF 2[2,3]

2

2

2

6

NA

AF1[1,2,3]

1

1

1

7

NA

DF

0

0

0

Table 10 lists the default values for 5P3D ingress mappings

Table 10    5P3D Mapping, Ingress from MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

SmartEdge PD Priority

SmartEdge PD Drop

DSCP

IP Precedence

MPLS EXP

Ethernet 802.1p

0

0

Network Control

7

7

7

1

0

Reserved

6

6

6

3

2

AF 4[1]

4

5

5

3

6

AF 4[3]

4

4

4

3

3

3

3

3

3

5

6

AF 2[3]

2

3

2

7

0

DF

0

1

1

7

6

DF-

0

0

0

Table 11 lists the default values for 5P3D egress mappings.

Table 11    5P3D Mapping, Egress to MPLS EXP and Ethernet 802.1p

SmartEdge PD Priority

SmartEdge PD Drop

DSCP

IP Precedence

MPLS EXP

Ethernet 802.1p

0

NA

Network Control

7

7

7

1

NA

Reserved

6

6

6

2

NA

EF

5

5

5

3

0, 1, 2

AF 4[1]

4

5

5

3

<>[0, 1, 2]

AF 4[2,3]

4

4

4

4

0, 1, 2

AF 3[1]

3

3

3

4

<> [0, 1, 2]

AF 3[2,3]

3

2

2

5

0, 1, 2

AF 2[1]

2

3

3

5

<>[0, 1, 2]

AF 2[2,3]

2

2

2

6

0, 1, 2

AF 1[1]

1

1

1

6

<>[0, 1, 2]

AF 1[2,3]

2

0

0

7

0

DF

0

1

1

7

<>0

DF-

0

0

0

1.53.6   Examples

The following example shows how to define the classification map pd-to-exp for PD values on egress, then to define the default mapping schema as 6P2D. It overrides the default mapping for PD user priority value af33 to MPLS EXP value 4, and specifies the default DSCP-to-EXP mapping for PD value 13:

[local]Redback(config)#qos class-map pd-to-exp mpls out

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#mapping-schema 6P2D

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#qos af33 to mpls 4

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#qos 13 use-ip

1.54   mark dscp

mark dscp dscp-class

no mark dscp dscp-class

1.54.1   Purpose

Assigns a quality of service (QoS) Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) priority to IP packets. For IPv4 packets, the DSCP marking is the upper six bits of the IPv4 header Type of Service (ToS) field. For IPv6 packets, the DSCP marking is the upper six bits of the IPv6 header Traffic Class field.

1.54.2   Command Mode

1.54.3   Syntax Description

dscp-class

Priority with which packets are marked. Values can be:


  • Integer from 0 to 63.

  • One of the keywords listed in Table 12.

1.54.4   Default

Packets are not assigned a DSCP priority.

1.54.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mark dscp command to assign a QoS DSCP priority to packets.


 Caution! 
Risk of overriding configurations. The SmartEdge router checks for and applies marking in a specific order. To reduce the risk, remember the following guidelines: Circuit-based marking overrides class-based marking and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) destination-based marking, through route maps, overrides both circuit-based and class-based marking.

Table 12 lists the keywords for the dscp-class argument.

Table 12    DSCP Class Keywords

DSCP Class

Keyword

DSCP Class

Keyword

Assured Forwarding (AF) Class 1/ Drop precedence 1

af11

Class Selector 0 (same as default forwarding)

cs0 (same as df)

AF Class 1/Drop precedence 2

af12

Class Selector 1

cs1

AF Class 1/Drop precedence 3

af13

Class Selector 2

cs2

AF Class 2/Drop precedence 1

af21

Class Selector 3

cs3

AF Class 2/Drop precedence 2

af22

Class Selector 4

cs4

AF Class 3/Drop precedence 3

af23

Class Selector 5

cs5

AF Class 3/Drop precedence 1

af31

Class Selector 6

cs6

AF Class 3/Drop precedence 2

af32

Class Selector 7

cs7

AF Class 3/Drop precedence 3

af33

Default Forwarding (same as Class Selector 0)

df (same as cs0)

AF Class 4/Drop precedence 1

af41

Expedited Forwarding

ef

AF Class 4/Drop precedence 2

af42

 

 

AF Class 4/Drop precedence 3

af43

 

 
Note:  
RFC 2474, Definition of the Differentiated Services Field (DS Field) in the IPv4 and IPv6 Headers, defines the Class Selector code points.

Use the no form of this command to specify the default behavior.

1.54.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the policy, GE-in policing, to mark all packets within the VOIP class as high-priority packets, while all packets within the best-effort class are marked as low-priority packets:

[local]Redback(config)#qos policy GE-in policing

[local]Redback(config-policy-policing)#access-group myacl cont2

[local]Redback(config-policy-group)#class VOIP

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#mark dscp ef

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#exit

[local]Redback(config-policy-group)#class best-effort

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#mark dscp df

1.55   mark dscp destination

mark dscp destination

{no | default} mark dscp destination

1.55.1   Purpose

Sets the Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) byte, based on Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) attributes, such as community list and autonomous system (AS) path, for incoming IP traffic on the specified interface.

1.55.2   Command Mode

Interface configuration

1.55.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.55.4   Default

Disabled

1.55.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mark dscp destination command to set the DSCP byte, based on BGP attributes, such as community list and autonomous AS path, for incoming IP traffic on the specified interface.

BGP destination-based quality of service (QoS) provides multiple levels of service based on a customer’s IP destination. BGP routes can be assigned a DSCP value based on the BGP traffic indexing and table map features associated with route maps. BGP routes can be assigned a traffic index. The byte and packet counters for the traffic index are incremented based on the route traversed by IP traffic received on the ingress interface.

When a packet is received on an interface with mark dscp destination enabled and the packet is routed using a route with associated DSCP, the packet's DCSP is updated and the IP header checksum is recalculated.


 Caution! 
Risk of overriding configurations. Because marking can be configured at different levels, the SmartEdge router checks for and applies marking in a specific order. To reduce the risk, remember the following points: Circuit-based marking overrides class-based marking. Circuit-based marking is configured through the conform and exceed commands in QoS policy rate configuration mode. Class-based marking is configured through the class command in policy ACL configuration mode and the mark command in policy ACL class configuration mode and BGP destination-based marking, through route maps, overrides both circuit-based and class-based marking.

Use the no form of this command to disable the DSCP byte marking for incoming IP traffic for the specified interface.

1.55.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable BGP-based marking on the appropriate ingress interface:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface CustomerOne

[local]Redback(config-if)#ip address 10.200.1.1/30

[local]Redback(config-if)#mark dscp destination

1.56   mark precedence

mark precedence prec-value

no mark precedence prec-value

1.56.1   Purpose

Assigns a quality of service (QoS) Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) drop-precedence value to IP packets that exceed the configured QoS rate. For IPv4 packets, the DSCP marking is the upper six bits of the IPv4 header Type of Service (ToS) field. For IPv6 packets, the DSCP marking is upper six bits of the IPv6 header Traffic Class field. In either case, the specific bits affected are those denoted by dd in the octet field with the format pppddxxx.

1.56.2   Command Mode

1.56.3   Syntax Description

prec-value

Drop precedence value. See Table 13.

1.56.4   Default

Packets are not marked with an explicit drop precedence value.

1.56.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mark precedence command to assign a QoS drop precedence value to packets.

Only one mark instruction can be in effect at a time. To change the mark instruction, enter the mark precedence command, specifying a new value for the prec-value argument, which supersedes the one previously configured.

Use the no form of this command to specify the default behavior.

In general, the level of forwarding assurance of an IP packet is based on: (1) the resources allocated to the AF class to which the packet belongs, (2) the current load of the AF class, and, in case of congestion within the class, (3) the drop precedence of the packet. In case of congestion, the drop precedence of a packet determines the relative importance of the packet within the assured forwarding (AF) Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) class. Packets with a lower drop precedence value are preferred and protected from being lost, while packets with a higher drop precedence value are discarded. (For more information see RFC 2597, Assured Forwarding PHB Group).

With AF classes AF1 (AF11, AF12, AF13), AF2 (AF21, AF22, AF23), AF3 (AF31, AF32, AF33), and AF4 (AF41, AF42, AF43), the second integer represents a drop precedence value. Table 13 shows how the AF drop precedence value of an incoming packet is changed when it exits the SmartEdge router after being tagged with a new drop precedence. (See also RFC 2597, Assured Forwarding PHB Group.)

Table 13    Drop Precedence Values

DSCP Value of an Incoming Packet

Packet is Tagged with a Drop Precedence Value

DSCP Value of the Outgoing Packet

AF11, AF12, AF13


AF21, AF22, AF23


AF31, AF32, AF33


AF41, AF42, AF43

1

AF11


AF21


AF31


AF41

AF11, AF12, AF13


AF21, AF22, AF23


AF31, AF32, AF33


AF41, AF42, AF43

2

AF12


AF22


AF32


AF42

AF11, AF12, AF13


AF21, AF22, AF23


AF31, AF32, AF33


AF41, AF42, AF43

3

AF13


AF23


AF33


AF43


 Caution! 
Risk of overriding configurations. The SmartEdge router checks for and applies marking in a specific order. To reduce the risk, remember the following guidelines: Circuit-based marking overrides class-based marking and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) destination-based marking, through route maps, overrides both circuit-based and class-based marking.

1.56.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the policy, GE-in policing, to mark all packets within the VOIP class as preferred packets, while all packets within the best-effort class are marked as less-preferred packets:

[local]Redback(config)#qos policy GE-in policing

[local]Redback(config-policy-policing)#access-group myacl cont2

[local]Redback(config-policy-group)#class VOIP

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#mark precedence 1

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#exit

[local]Redback(config-policy-group)#class best-effort

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#mark precedence 3

1.57   mark priority

mark priority {group-num | ignore} [{drop-precedence {group-num | ignore} | af-drop drop-value}]

no mark priority

1.57.1   Purpose

Sets the internal packet descriptor (PD) quality of service (QoS) classification value for specified packets, while preserving the packet’s IP header Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value.

1.57.2   Command Mode

1.57.3   Syntax Description

group-num

Priority group number. The range of values is 0 to 7.


The scale used by this command for packet priority, from 0 (highest priority) to 7 (lowest priority), is the relative inverse of the scale used by QoS classification map and classification definition commands.

ignore

Specifies that the internal PD priority or drop-precedence value is not modified.

drop-precedence

Optional. Enables you to specify a setting for either the drop-precedence portion of the PD QoS field or the priority group, or both.

af-drop drop-value

Optional. Target internal drop-precedence value in two-bit format; leaves the least significant bit unmodified. The range of values is 1 to 3.

1.57.4   Default

The PD QoS values for a packet are not modified.

1.57.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mark priority command to set the internal PD QoS classification value for specified packets, while preserving the packet’s IP header DSCP value.

A priority group is an internal value used by the SmartEdge router to determine into which egress queue the inbound packet should be placed. The type of service (ToS) value, DSCP value, and Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) bits are unchanged by this command. The actual queue number depends on the number of queues configured on the circuit. For more information, see the num-queue command in Command List.

The SmartEdge router uses the factory preset, or default, mapping of a priority group to a queue, according to the number of queues configured on a circuit; see Table 14.

Table 14    Default Mapping of Priority Groups

Priority Group

8 Queues

4 Queues

2 Queues

1 Queue

0

Queue 0

Queue 0

Queue 0

Queue 0

1

Queue 1

Queue 1

Queue 1

Queue 0

2

Queue 2

Queue 1

Queue 1

Queue 0

3

Queue 3

Queue 2

Queue 1

Queue 0

4

Queue 4

Queue 2

Queue 1

Queue 0

5

Queue 5

Queue 2

Queue 1

Queue 0

6

Queue 6

Queue 2

Queue 1

Queue 0

7

Queue 7

Queue 3

Queue 1

Queue 0

Only one mark instruction can be in effect at a time. To change the mark instruction, enter the mark priority command, specifying a new value for the group-num arguments. This supersedes the value previously configured.


 Caution! 
Risk of overriding configurations. The SmartEdge router checks for and applies marking in a specific order. To reduce the risk, remember the following guidelines: Circuit-based marking overrides class-based marking and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) destination-based marking, through route maps, overrides both circuit-based and class-based marking.
Note:  
By default, the SmartEdge router assigns a priority group to each egress queue, according to the number of queues configured on a circuit. You can override the default mapping of packets into egress queues by creating a customized queue priority map through the qos queue-map command (in global configuration mode).

If neither the drop-precedence nor the af-drop keyword is specified, the priority bits are set to the specified value and the drop-precedence bits are cleared.

Use the no form of this command to return to the default behavior.

1.57.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the policy, GE-in policing, to mark all packets within the VOIP class as high-priority packets, while all packets within the best-effort class are marked as low-priority packets:

[local]Redback(config)#qos policy GE-in policing

[local]Redback(config-policy-policing)#access-group myacl cont2

[local]Redback(config-policy-group)#class VOIP

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#mark priority 2

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#exit

[local]Redback(config-policy-group)#class best-effort

[local]Redback(config-policy-group-class)#mark priority 7

1.58   master

master

no master

1.58.1   Purpose

Configures the current bridge as a Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) master bridge.

1.58.2   Command Mode

spanning-tree configuration

1.58.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.58.4   Default

Current bridge is not an RSTP master.

1.58.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the master command to configure the current bridge as an RSTP master bridge.

Bridges that are not running RSTP and are enabled for tracking by the track spanning-tree command are called client bridges. The state of all client bridge circuits on the same port as a master bridge circuit follow the state of the RSTP master. When the state of the circuit controlled by the master bridge changes to blocking, forwarding, or flushing, all circuits on the same port of the tracking client bridges change to the same state.

Use the no form of this command to disable tracking of the RSTP master bridge.

1.58.6   Examples

The following example shows how configure an RSTP master bridge and a client bridge configured for tracking:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bridge blue
[local]Redback(config-bridge)#spanning-tree
[local]Redback(config-bridge-stp)#master
[local]Redback(config-bridge-stp)#end
!
[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bridge green
[local]Redback(config-bridge)#track spanning-tree blue local
[local]Redback(config-bridge)#end

1.59   match as-path-list

match as-path-list apl-name

no match as-path-list apl-name

1.59.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes that include the specified Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) autonomous system (AS) path list.

1.59.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.59.3   Syntax Description

apl-name

AS path list name.

1.59.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.59.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match as-path-list command to permit or deny routes that include the specified BGP AS path list. A route map can have several entries. Any route that does not match at least one match clause corresponding to a route map is ignored; that is, the route is not advertised for outbound route maps and is not accepted for inbound route maps. To modify only some data, you must configure a second route map section with an explicit match condition specified.

Use the no form of this command to remove the match condition.

1.59.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes that include AS path list 5:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map asp-regex permit 10

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match as-path-list 5

1.60   match community-list

match community-list cl-name [exact-match]

no match community-list cl-name

1.60.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with an associated Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) community attribute that matches the specified community list.

1.60.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.60.3   Syntax Description

cl-name

Name of the community list.

exact-match

Optional. Defines communities in the community list that must match exactly.

1.60.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.60.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match community-list command to permit or deny routes with an associated BGP community attribute that matches the specified community list.

When the exact-match keyword is specified, the community list entries must match the BGP community attribute exactly. In other words, the community list must have the same number of entries as the BGP community attribute, and each community list entry, community number, or well-known community must be present in the BGP community attribute. In addition, the community list used for exact matching must not have any deny entries or any entries with a regular expression specification.

A route map can have several sequenced entries. Any route that does not satisfy all the match conditions associated with a route map entry is ignored and the next higher sequenced route map entry is examined.

See the community-list command in context configuration mode for more information.

Use the no form of this command to disable the match condition.

1.60.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit any route that includes the attribute community list 1:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#community-list 1 

[local]Redback(config-community-list)#permit 11

[local]Redback(config-community-list)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map map_A

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match community-list 1

1.61   match ext-community-list

match ext-community-list ecl-name [exact-match]

no match community-list ecl-name

1.61.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with an associated Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) extended community attribute that matches the specified extended community list.

1.61.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.61.3   Syntax Description

ecl-name

Name of the extended community list.

exact-match

Optional. Defines extended communities in the extended community list that must match exactly.

1.61.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.61.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match ext-community-list command to permit or deny routes with an associated BGP extended community attribute that matches the specified extended community list.

When the exact-match keyword is specified, the extended community list entries must match the BGP extended community attribute exactly. In other words, the extended community list must have the same number of entries as the BGP extended community attribute, and each extended community list entry, extended community number, or well-known extended community must be present in the BGP extended community attribute. In addition, the extended community list used for exact matching must not have any deny entries or any entries with a regular expression specification.

A route map can have several sequenced entries. Any route that does not satisfy all the match conditions associated with a route map entry is ignored and the next higher sequenced route map entry is examined.

See the ext-community-list command in context configuration mode for more information.

Use the no form of this command to disable the match condition.

1.61.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit any route that includes the extended community list 1 attribute:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ext-community-list 1 

[local]Redback(config-community-list)#permit 11

[local]Redback(config-community-list)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map map_A

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match ext-community-list 1

1.62   match ip address prefix-list

match ip address prefix-list pl-name

no match ip address prefix-list pl-name

1.62.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with a destination IP address permitted by the specified IP prefix list.

1.62.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.62.3   Syntax Description

pl-name

Name of the IP prefix list used to match route destinations.

1.62.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.62.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match ip address prefix-list command to permit or deny routes with a destination IP address permitted by the specified IP prefix list. To create an IP prefix list, use the ip prefix-list command in context configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to disable IP address matching.

1.62.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes that have destination IP addresses specified in an IP prefix list, prefix8:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map rmap_B

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match ip address prefix-list prefix8

1.63   match ip next-hop prefix-list

match ip next-hop prefix-list pl-name

no match ip next-hop prefix-list pl-name

1.63.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with a next-hop IP address that is permitted by the specified IP prefix list.

1.63.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.63.3   Syntax Description

pl-name

Name of the IP prefix list used to match the next-hop IP address.

1.63.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.63.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match ip next-hop prefix-list command to permit or deny routes with a next-hop IP address permitted by the specified IP prefix list. To create an IP prefix list, use the ip prefix-list command in context configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to disable next-hop IP address matching.

1.63.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes that have a next-hop IP address permitted by either prefix list, prefix11 or prefix98:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map rmap_C
[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match ip next-hop prefix-list prefix11 prefix98

1.64   match ipv6 address prefix-list

match ipv6 address prefix-list ipv6-pl-name

no match ipv6 address prefix-list ipv6-pl-name

1.64.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with a destination IP Version 6 (IPv6) address permitted by the specified IPv6 prefix list.

1.64.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.64.3   Syntax Description

ipv6-pl-name

Name of the IPv6 prefix list used to match route destinations.

1.64.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.64.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match ipv6 address prefix-list command to permit or deny routes with a destination IPv6 address permitted by the specified IPv6 prefix list. To create an IPv6 prefix list, use the ipv6 prefix-list command in context configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to disable IPv6 address matching.

1.64.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes that have destination IPv6 addresses specified in an IPv6 prefix list, prefix8:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map rmap_B

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match ipv6 address prefix-list prefix8

1.65   match ipv6 next-hop prefix-list

match ip next-hop prefix-list ipv6-pl-name

no match ip next-hop prefix-list ipv6-pl-name

1.65.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with a next-hop IP Version 6 (IPv6) address that is permitted by the specified IPv6 prefix list.

1.65.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.65.3   Syntax Description

ipv6-pl-name

Name of the IPv6 prefix list used to match the next-hop IPv6 address.

1.65.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.65.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match ipv6 next-hop prefix-list command to permit or deny routes with a next-hop IPv6 address permitted by the specified IPv6 prefix list. To create an IPv6 prefix list, use the ipv6 prefix-list command in context configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to disable next-hop IPv6 address matching.

1.65.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes that have a next-hop IPv6 address permitted by either IPv6 prefix list, ipv6pl4 or ipv6pl72:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map rmap_C
[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match ipv6 next-hop prefix-list ipv6pl4 ipv6pl72

1.66   match metric

match metric metric

no match metric metric

1.66.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes with a specified metric value.

1.66.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.66.3   Syntax Description

metric

Route metric value. The range of values is 0 to 4294967295.

1.66.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.66.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match metric command to permit or deny routes with a specified metric value.

Use the no form of this command to disable the match condition.

1.66.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes with a metric value of 5:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map rmap_D
[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match metric 5

1.67   match route-type

match route-type {internal | external [type-1 | type-2] | level-1 | level-2 | nssa-external [type-1 | type-2] | dvsr}

no match route-type

1.67.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes that match a specified route type.

1.67.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.67.3   Syntax Description

internal

Matches internal Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) intra-area and inter-area routes.

external

Specifies Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) and OSPF external routes.

type-1

Optional. Matches OSPF Type 1 external routes when used with the external keyword. Matches OSPF not-so-stubby-area (NSSA) Type 1 external routes when used with the nssa-external keyword.

type-2

Optional. Matches OSPF Type 2 external routes when use with the external keyword. Matches OSPF NSSA Type 2 external routes when used with the nssa-external keyword.

level-1

Matches Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) Level 1 routes.

level-2

Matches IS-IS Level 2 routes.

nssa-external

Matches OSPF NSSA external routes.

dvsr

Matches dynamically verified static routing (DVSR) subtype of static route.

1.67.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.67.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match route-type command to permit or deny routes that match a specified route type.

Use the no form of this command to disable route type matching.

1.67.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit or deny internal OSPF routes:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map map_E

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match route-type internal

1.68   match tag

match tag tag

no match tag

1.68.1   Purpose

Permits or denies routes that match a specified route tag value.

1.68.2   Command Mode

Route map configuration

1.68.3   Syntax Description

tag

Unsigned integer. The range of values is 0 to 4,294,967,295.

1.68.4   Default

There are no preconfigured route map match conditions.

1.68.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the match tag command to permit or deny routes that match a specified route tag value.

Use the no form of this command to disable route tag matching.

1.68.6   Examples

The following example shows how to permit routes using a route tag value of 5:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map map_F

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#match tag 5

1.69   max-age

max-age sec

{no | default} max-age

1.69.1   Purpose

Sets the maximum age of received bridge protocol data units (BPDUs).

1.69.2   Command Mode

spanning-tree configuration

1.69.3   Syntax Description

sec

Maximum age in seconds (6 to 40). The maximum age must be in whole seconds and within the following range:


2 * (forward-delay - 1.0) >= max-age >= 2 * (hello-interval + 1.0).

1.69.4   Default

20 seconds

1.69.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-age command to set the maximum age of the received BPDUs; that is, the maximum time received BPDU information is saved, after which it is discarded. This command applies when the current bridge is the root bridge.

1.69.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the forward-delay, max-age, and hello-interval:

[local]Redback(config)#context bridge
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bridge isp1
[local]Redback(config-bridge)#spanning-tree
[local]Redback(config-bridge-stp)#forward-delay 20
[local]Redback(config-bridge-stp)#max-age 38
[local]Redback(config-bridge-stp)#hello-interval 2

1.70   max-flows-per-circuit

max-flows-per-circuit value

default max-flows-per-circuit

1.70.1   Purpose

Sets the maximum number of flows the system can create on a circuit.

1.70.2   Command Mode

Flow configuration

1.70.3   Syntax Description

value

Maximum number of flows the system can create on a circuit. The range of values is 1 to 2097152.

1.70.4   Default

None

1.70.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-flows-per-circuit command to set the maximum number of flows the system can create on a circuit.

Use the default form of this command to set the rate at the previously set value.

1.70.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum number of flows the system can generate on the current circuit to 2000:

[local]Redback(config-ac-profile)#max-flows-per-circuit 2000

1.71   max-groups

max-groups count [drop-old]

no max-groups

1.71.1   Purpose

Configures the maximum number of groups a single circuit can join.

1.71.2   Command Mode

1.71.3   Syntax Description

count

Maximum number of joined groups. Range is from 1 to 100000 groups.

drop-old

Optional. Drops the oldest IGMP group on the interface and accepts the new IGMP report.

1.71.4   Default

Unlimited number of groups.

1.71.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-groups command to configure the maximum number of groups a single circuit can join.

If the addition of a new group on an interface causes the total number of joined groups to exceed the maximum number allowed, either of the following actions is taken:

Use the no form of this command to remove the maximum number of IGMP-joined groups restriction.

1.71.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure a maximum of 3 joined groups for each interface:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#profile bar
[local]Redback(config-igmp-service-profile)#max-groups 3

The following example shows how to configure the maximum groups setting in an IGMP profile called sanjose1. If this profile is associated with a circuit, then the maximum number of groups that circuit can join is set to 3. If the circuit joins more than 3 groups, then the circuit drops its join with the oldest group:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#igmp snooping profile sanjose
[local]Redback(config-igmp-snooping-profile)#max-groups 3

1.72   max-hops

max-hops count

{no | default} max-hops count

1.72.1   Purpose

Configures the maximum hop count allowed for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) requests.

1.72.2   Command Mode

DHCP relay server configuration

1.72.3   Syntax Description

count

Hop count. The range of values is 1 to 16.

1.72.4   Default

The maximum hop count is four.

1.72.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-hops command to configure the maximum hop count allowed for DHCP requests.

Use the no or default form of this command to return to the default DHCP relay server maximum hop count of four.

1.72.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure a maximum of 12 hops allowed for DHCP requests to DHCP server, 10.30.40.50:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#dhcp relay server 10.30.40.50

[local]Redback(config-dhcp-relay)#max-hops 12

[local]Redback(config-dhcp-relay)#

1.73   maximum-links

maximum-links max-active

{no | default} maximum-links

1.73.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum number of active links in the 802.1Q, Ethernet, or access link group.

1.73.2   Command Mode

Link group configuration

1.73.3   Syntax Description

max-active

Maximum number of active links in the link group. The range of values depends on the type of Fast Ethernet (FE) or Gigabit Ethernet (GE) port and the type of link group; see Table 15 for the range of values for each type of port and link group. The default value is 1 for an access link group and 8 for any other type of link group.

1.73.4   Default

The number of active links in a link group is one for any type of link group.

1.73.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum-links command to specify the maximum number of active links in the 802.1Q, Ethernet, or access link group.

Table 15 lists the range of values for the max-active argument when configuring an 802.1Q, Ethernet, or access link group with SmartEdge 100 native ports, FE and GE ports on media interface cards (MICs), or SmartEdge 400 and SmartEdge 800 traffic cards.

Table 15    Range of Values for max-active Argument

Port Type

Link Group Type

Range of Values

GE3, GE1020, 10GE

Access

1 to 2(1)

 

Ethernet

1 to 8

 

802.1Q

1 to 8

FE, GE (all other versions)

Access

1 to 8

 

Ethernet

1 to 8

 

802.1Q

1 to 8

(1)  Configuring a value of 2 is subject to configuration restrictions. See the paragraph immediately following this table.


In general, an access link group with GE3, GE1020, or 10GE ports can have only one active port (in the up state) among the constituent circuits in the group; however, you can specify two active ports with this command, subject to the following restrictions:

If you add more ports to the link group than the maximum number of active links specified by the max-active argument, the remaining links are treated as hot standby links. The system communicates the standby state for these links to the partner system using Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default condition.

1.73.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the lg-ether link group with a maximum of 2 active links:

[local]Redback(config)#link-group lg-ether ether
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#maximum-links 2

1.74   maximum paths (IS-IS)

maximum paths paths

{no | default} maximum paths

1.74.1   Purpose

Changes the router’s default number of multiple equal-cost Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) paths for load balancing of outgoing traffic packets.

1.74.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.74.3   Syntax Description

paths

Maximum number of equal-cost paths used as the best paths. The range of values is 1 to 8.

1.74.4   Default

The maximum number of equal-cost paths is 8.

1.74.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum paths command to change the router’s default number of multiple equal-cost IS-IS paths for load balancing of outgoing traffic packets. The SmartEdge router load balances among these IS-IS paths if, in the routing table, they are the best paths among paths provided by all running routing protocols.

Use the no or default form of this command to restore the default setting.

1.74.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum number of paths to 4:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis isis01

[local]Redback(config-isis)#maximum paths 4

1.75   maximum-paths (RIP)

maximum-paths path-num

{no | default} maximum-paths

1.75.1   Purpose

Modifies the number of multiple equal-cost Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or RIP next generation (RIPng) routes that can be used as the best paths for load balancing outgoing traffic packets.

1.75.2   Command Mode

1.75.3   Syntax Description

path-num

Maximum number of equal-cost routes used as the best paths. The range of values is 1 to 16; the default value is 8.

1.75.4   Default

The maximum number of equal-cost routes is 8.

1.75.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum-paths command to modify the number of multiple equal-cost RIP or RIPng routes that can be used as the best paths for load balancing outgoing traffic packets. The SmartEdge router enables load balancing among these RIP or RIPng paths if, in the routing table, they are the best paths among paths provided by all running routing protocols.

Use the no or default form of this command to restore the default setting.

1.75.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable load balancing between two RIP paths for outgoing traffic packets:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rip rip001

[local]Redback(config-rip)#maximum-paths 2

1.76   maximum ports

maximum ports num-ports

{no | default} maximum ports [num-ports]

1.76.1   Purpose

Specifies the number of software-configurable ports on an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) DS-3 traffic card.

1.76.2   Command Mode

Card configuration

1.76.3   Syntax Description

num-ports

Number of ports that can be configured. Optional only in the no and default forms. The allowed values are 4, 8, and 12.

1.76.4   Default

All ports on the card are software configurable.

1.76.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum ports command to specify the number of software-configurable ports on an ATM DS-3 traffic card. Ports 1, 2, and so on (up to and including the name of the num-ports argument) are enabled with this command. The effect of this command is to increase the number of permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) that can be created on any of the software-configurable ports for each traffic class. For more information about the number of PVCs that can be created on each port, see ATM Configuration Guidelines.

You must enter this command before you enter any other port-level configuration commands for this traffic card; it fails if there are any existing ports configured for this traffic card.

Note:  
The SmartEdge 600, SmartEdge 800, SmartEdge 1200, and SmartEdge 1200H chassis do not support the ATM DS-3 traffic card.

You must enter the commit command (in any configuration mode) before you configure any ports on the traffic card. The commit command reloads the segmentation and reassembly (SAR) image on the traffic card, which causes the limit specified by the maximum ports command to take effect.

The remaining ports are held (in shutdown mode) and cannot be configured. An error message displays if you specify one of these ports when entering the port atm command (in global configuration mode).

Use the no or default form of this command to specify that all ports are software configurable.

1.76.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify ports 1 to 8 on the ATM DS-3 traffic card in slot 5 are software configurable:

[local]Redback(config)#card atm-ds3 5

[local]Redback(config-card)#maximum ports 8

1.77   maximum prefix

maximum prefix max-prefix [threshold threshold] [downtime interval | warning-only]

no maximum prefix max-prefix [threshold threshold] [downtime interval | warning-only]

1.77.1   Purpose

Specifies how the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routing process responds when the maximum number of prefixes sent by the BGP neighbor or BGP peer group for the specified address family is exceeded.

1.77.2   Command Mode

BGP neighbor address family configuration

1.77.3   Syntax Description

max-prefix

Maximum number of prefixes that can be sent by the neighbor. The range of values is 1 to 4,294,967,295; the default is an unlimited number of prefixes.

threshold threshold

Optional. Warning that is generated when the specified threshold value, expressed as a percentage, is reached. The range of values is 1 to 100; the default value is 75.

downtime interval

Optional. Interval, in seconds, for which the connection to the neighbor is down once the specified maximum number of prefixes is exceeded. If this keyword construct is not enabled, the connection remains down until the clear bgp ip-address command in exec mode is issued.

warning-only

Optional. Issues a warning to the neighbor once the specified maximum number of prefixes is exceeded. The connection remains intact.

1.77.4   Default

The BGP routing process accepts an unlimited number of prefixes. If you enter this command without any keywords, the BGP session will be torn down once the max-prefix argument value is exceeded. The session remains down until the clear bgp ip-address command is issued. The threshold is 75.

1.77.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum prefix command to specify how the BGP routing process responds when the maximum number of prefixes sent by the BGP neighbor or BGP peer group for the specified address family is exceeded.

Use the no form of this command to return the BGP routing process to the default behavior of allowing an unlimited number of routes and to reset the system to the default behavior of dropping the BGP session when the maximum number of prefixes is exceeded.

1.77.6   Examples

The following example shows how to allow a maximum number of 10000 unicast routes from the neighbor at IP address 102.210.210.1 and generates a warning after 90% of the routes (9000) are received:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 102.210.210.1 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#address-family ipv4 unicast

[local]Redback(config-bgp-peer-af)#maximum prefix 10000 threshold 90

Once 10,000 unicast routes are received, the BGP routing process drops the BGP session. The session remains down until the clear bgp 102.210.210.1 command in exec mode is issued.

1.78   maximum redistribute (IS-IS)

maximum redistribute prefixes [retry-interval interval]

no maximum redistribute

1.78.1   Purpose

Limits the maximum number of routes that can be redistributed into the specified Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) instance.

1.78.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.78.3   Syntax Description

prefixes

Maximum number of prefixes that can be redistributed into the IS-IS routing instance. The range of values is 1 to 1,000,000.

retry-interval interval

Optional. Amount of time, in seconds, before IS-IS attempts to redistribute routes after the maximum prefix value is exceeded. The range of values is 120 to 7,200; the default value is 600.

1.78.4   Default

There is no maximum limit for the number of prefixes that can be redistributed. The retry interval is 600 seconds.

1.78.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum redistribute command to limit the maximum number of routes that can be redistributed into the specified IS-IS instance.

If the maximum number of redistributed prefixes is reached, IS-IS stops redistributing external routes for the duration specified by the retry-interval interval construct.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default settings.

1.78.6   Examples

The following example shows how to redistribute up to 50000 prefixes into the isis01 IS-IS instance. If this number is exceeded, routes are not redistributed again for 300 seconds (5 minutes):

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis isis01
[local]Redback(config-isis)#maximum redistribute 50000 retry-interval 300

1.79   maximum redistribute (OSPF)

maximum redistribute prefixes [retry-interval interval]

no maximum redistribute

1.79.1   Purpose

Sets a maximum limit on the number of routes that can be redistributed into the specified Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) or OSPF Version 3 (OSPFv3) instance.

1.79.2   Command Mode

1.79.3   Syntax Description

prefixes

Maximum number of routes that can be redistributed into the OSPF or OSPFv3 routing instance. The range of values is 1 to 100,000.

retry-interval interval

Optional. Amount of time, in minutes, before OSPF or OSPFv3 attempts to redistribute routes after the maximum prefix value is exceeded. The range of values is 1 to 120.

1.79.4   Default

No maximum.

1.79.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum redistribute command to set a maximum limit on the number of routes that can be redistributed into the specified OSPF or OSPFv3 instance.

If the maximum number of redistributed prefixes is reached, OSPF or OSPFv3 stops redistributing external routes for the duration specified by the interval argument.

Use the no form of this command to return to the default setting, which is an unlimited number of routes.

1.79.6   Examples

The following example shows how to limit redistribution of routes into the OSPF routing instance, 650 to 5000:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ospf 650

[local]Redback(config-ospf)#maximum redistribute 5000

1.80   maximum redistribute-quantum

maximum redistribute-quantum prefixes

no maximum redistribute-quantum

1.80.1   Purpose

Sets a maximum limit on the number of routes that can be redistributed per second into the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) or OSPF Version 3 (OSPFv3) instance.

1.80.2   Command Mode

1.80.3   Syntax Description

prefixes

Maximum number of routes that can be redistributed per second into the OSPF or OSPFv3 routing instance. The range of values is 1 to 10,000; the default value is 2,000.

1.80.4   Default

The maximum number of routes that can be redistributed per second into the OSPF or OSPFv3 routing instance is 2,000.

1.80.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum redistribute-quantum command to set a maximum limit on the number of routes that can be redistributed per second into the OSPF or OSPFv3 routing instance.

Use the no form of this command to return the limit to its default value of 2,000 routes per second.

1.80.6   Examples

The following example shows how to the maximum number of routes that can be redistributed per second into the OSPF routing instance 30 to 1000:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ospf 30

[local]Redback(config-ospf)#maximum redistribute-quantum 1000

1.81   maximum restart-time

maximum restart-time interval

no maximum restart-time interval

1.81.1   Purpose

Sets the maximum amount of time that it will take for a local Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) peer to come up after it has been reset.

1.81.2   Command Mode

1.81.3   Syntax Description

interval

Maximum time, in seconds, that a remote peer will hold the routes received from a local bgp peer after the local peer has been reset during BGP graceful restart. The range of values is 10 to 180; the default value is 120.

1.81.4   Default

The command is disabled. When enabled, the local BGP speaker attempts to reconnect with the remote peer after 120 seconds.

1.81.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum restart-time command to set the maximum amount of time that it will take for a local BGP peer to come up after it has been reset.

This graceful restart capability allows a BGP speaker to indicate its ability to preserve its forwarding state during BGP restart.

Use the no form of this command to disable a maximum restart time.

1.81.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the BGP routing process for autonomous system, 64001, to attempt to reconnect with the remote peer within 40 seconds after a reset has occurred:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 64001

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#maximum restart-time 40

The following example shows how to configure the external BGP (eBGP) neighbor, 10.1.1.1, to attempt to reconnect with the remote peer within 45 seconds after a reset has occurred:

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 10.1.1.1 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#maximum restart-time 45

1.82   maximum retain-time

maximum retain-time interval

no maximum retain-time interval

1.82.1   Purpose

Configures the maximum amount of time the local Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) speaker retains routes it previously received from a remote peer once that remote peer restarts the connection.

1.82.2   Command Mode

1.82.3   Syntax Description

interval

Maximum amount of time, in seconds, that the local BGP speaker retains routes it has previously received from the remote peer. The range of values is 30 to 300; the default value is 180 seconds.

1.82.4   Default

The command is disabled. When enabled, the local BGP speaker retains routes it has previously received from the remote peer for 180 seconds, or three minutes.

1.82.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum retain-time command to set the maximum amount of time the local BGP speaker retains routes it previously received from a remote peer once that remote peer restarts the connection.

Any routes that have not been updated by the remote peer are deleted by the local peer after the local peer receives the end-of-routing information base (RIB) marker from the remote peer, or after the timer expires. An end-of-RIB marker from the remote peer indicates that its initial update has been completed.

Use the no form of this command to disable the maximum retain time.

1.82.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the BGP routing process for autonomous system, 64001, to retain routes that have been received from a remote peer once the remote peer restarts the connection for 120 seconds, or two minutes:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 64001

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#maximum retain-time 120

The following example shows how to configure the external BGP (eBGP) neighbor, 10.1.1.1, to attempt to retain routes from a remote peer once the remote peer restarts the connection for 90 seconds:

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 10.1.1.1 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#maximum retain-time 90

1.83   maximum update-delay

maximum update-delay interval

no maximum update-delay interval

1.83.1   Purpose

Sets the maximum delay time for the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routing process after a reset has occurred before performing initial best-path calculations.

1.83.2   Command Mode

BGP router configuration

1.83.3   Syntax Description

interval

Maximum amount of time, in seconds, that the BGP routing process waits after reset before performing initial best-path calculations. The range of values is 1 to 300.

1.83.4   Default

The command is disabled.

1.83.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the maximum update-delay command to set the maximum delay time for the BGP routing process after a reset has occurred before performing initial best-path calculations.

This feature is useful in the case where not all peers support a graceful restart, and in the case where a peer may not send an end-of-Routing Information Base (RIB) marker. Best-path calculations are performed after all peers have send an end-of-RIB marker, or when the timer expires.

Use the no form of this command to disable the maximum delay time.

1.83.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the BGP routing process for autonomous system, 64001, to wait 60 seconds, or one minute, after a reset has occurred before performing initial best-path calculations:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 64001

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#maximum update-delay 60

1.84   max-lease-time

max-lease-time seconds

no max-lease-time seconds

1.84.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum allowed time for the lease for this internal Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server or one of its subnets.

1.84.2   Command Mode

1.84.3   Syntax Description

seconds

Maximum allowed time for the lease (in seconds). The range of values is 180 seconds 900 seconds (15 minutes) to 31,536,000 seconds (one year).

1.84.4   Default

24 hours

1.84.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-lease-time command to specify the maximum allowed lease time for this internal DHCP server or one of its subnets. Enter this command in DHCP server configuration mode to specify the maximum allowed lease time for all subnets; enter it in DHCP subnet configuration mode to specify the maximum allowed lease time for that subnet. The value that you specify for a subnet overrides the global value for the server.

Note:  
If the default lease time is set very low, it will affect the performance of the SmartEdge router, causing some subscribers to lose their leases.

Use the no form of this command to specify the default value for the maximum allowed lease time.

1.84.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify a maximum allowed lease time of 48 hours (172800) for the DHCP server and all its subnets:

[local]Redback(config)#context dhcp

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#dhcp server policy

[local]Redback(config-dhcp-server)#maximum-lease-time 172800

1.85   max-pending-registrations

max-pending-registrations maximum

no max-pending-registrations maximum

1.85.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum number of pending registrations permitted for this home-agent (HA) peer.

1.85.2   Command Mode

HA peer configuration

1.85.3   Syntax Description

maximum

Maximum number of pending registrations permitted for this HA peer. The range of values is 1 to 65535.

1.85.4   Default

Pending registrations are unlimited.

1.85.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-pending-registrations command to specify maximum number of pending registrations permitted for this HA peer.

Use the no form of this command to specify the default condition.

1.85.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify that a maximum of 10 pending registrations are permitted for this HA peer:

[local]Redback(config)#context fa

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router mobile-ip

[local]Redback(config-mip)#foreign-agent

[local]Redback(config-mip-fa)#home-agent-peer 10.1.1.1

[local]Redback(config-mip-ha-peer)#max-pending-registrations 10

1.86   max-session

max-session sessions

{no | default} max-session sessions

1.86.1   Purpose

Enables the creation of pseudo-circuits for the Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) label-switched paths (LSPs), and configures the maximum number of LDP sessions allowed on the router.

1.86.2   Command Mode

LDP router configuration

1.86.3   Syntax Description

sessions

Optional. Maximum number of LDP peer sessions allowed on this router.

1.86.4   Default

1200 LDP sessions

1.86.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-session command to change the maximum number of LDP peer sessions.

Use the default form of this command to return to the default value of 1200 sessions.

Use the no form of this command to disable the creation of pseudo-circuits for the LDP LSPs.

Use the show ldp summary command to display the maximum number of LDP sessions currently configured on this router.

Use the show configuration ldp command to display the LDP commands that are configured in the current context.

1.86.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum number of LDP session for the LSR to 1000:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ldp

[local]Redback(config-ldp)#max-session 1000

1.87   max-sessions

max-sessions max-ses-num

no max-sessions

1.87.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum number of sessions allowed for a Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) tunnel to a peer or context.

1.87.2   Command Mode

1.87.3   Syntax Description

max-ses-num

Maximum number of sessions allowed for a tunnel or context. The range of values is 1 to 65,535; the default value is 65,535.

1.87.4   Default

65,535

1.87.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-sessions command to specify the maximum number of sessions allowed for an L2TP tunnel to a peer. For User Datagram Protocol (UDP) tunnels, a new tunnel opens if the max-ses-num argument value has been reached for the current tunnel and the maximum number of tunnels (max-tunl-num argument value for the max-tunnels command in L2TP peer configuration mode) has not been exceeded.

You cannot use this command if you entered L2TP peer configuration mode using the l2tp-peer command with the default keyword (in context configuration mode).

Use the max-sessions command to configure the maximum number of sessions allowed in a given context. This value is applied to all peers configured in this context. If you are using the max-sessions command at context level, use this command to enforce the maximum number of L2TP sessions that all the LNS Peers configured in a given context may establish.

Use the no or default form of this command (in any configuration mode) to set the maximum number of sessions to the default.

1.87.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum number of sessions allowed per tunnel to a peer to 1000:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#l2tp-peer name peer1

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#max-sessions 1000


The following example shows how to set the maximum number of sessions allowed per tunnel to a context to 1000:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#l2tp max-sessions 1000

1.88   max-tunnels

max-tunnels max-tunl-num

{no | default} max-tunnels

1.88.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum number of tunnels allowed to a Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) peer.

1.88.2   Command Mode

L2TP peer configuration

1.88.3   Syntax Description

max-tunl-num

Maximum number of tunnels allowed. The range of values is 1 to 32,767; the default value is 32,767.

1.88.4   Default

32,767

1.88.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the max-tunnels command to specify the maximum number of tunnels allowed to an L2TP peer.

Use the no or default form of this command to set the maximum number of tunnels allowed to the default.

1.88.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum number of tunnels allowed to 2:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#l2tp-peer name peer1

[local]Redback(config-l2tp)#max-tunnels 2

1.89   mdt default-group

mdt default-group ip-addr

no mdt default-group ip-addr

1.89.1   Purpose

Specifies the default multicast domain tree (MDT) group.

1.89.2   Command Mode

Interface configuration

1.89.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

IP address of the default MDT group in the form A.B.C.D.

1.89.4   Default

No default MDT group is specified.

1.89.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mdt default-group command to specify the default MDT group.

You must configure the mdt default-group command on an intercontext interface in a Virtual Private Network (VPN) context. The intercontext interface creates an intercontext circuit between the VPN context and the local context.

Use the no form of this command to disable the default MDT group.

1.89.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the default MDT group, 30.40.50.60, on an intercontext interface, to-local, in a VPN context, VPN1:

[local]Redback(config)#context VPN1 vpn-rd 101:202

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface to-local intercontext p2p 2

[local]Redback(config-if)#mdt default-group 30.40.50.60

1.90   mdt encapsulation

mdt encapsulation {gre | ip}

no mdt encapsulation {gre | ip}

1.90.1   Purpose

Specifies the multicast domain tree (MDT) encapsulation type.

1.90.2   Command Mode

Interface configuration

1.90.3   Syntax Description

gre

Uses the Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) encapsulation type.

ip

Uses the IP-in-IP encapsulation type.

1.90.4   Default

No MDT encapsulation type is specified.

1.90.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mdt encapsulation command to specify the MDT encapsulation type.

You must configure this command on a loopback interface in the local context. The loopback interface is used to source multicast packets on the MDT.

Note:  
The Protocol Independent Multicast-Sparse Mode (PIM-SM) explicit join mechanism is optimal only for sparsely populated groups.

Use the no form of this command to remove the MDT encapsulation type.

1.90.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the MDT encapsulation type, gre, for the loopback interface, to-vpn1:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface to-vpn1 intercontext p2p 1

[local]Redback(config-if)#mdt encapsulation gre

1.91   medium (fast-ethernet)

medium {auto | speed speed duplex mode}

{no | default} medium

1.91.1   Purpose

Specifies the port speed and duplex mode for all Fast Ethernet (FE) ports on this Fast Ethernet-Gigabit Ethernet (FE-GE) traffic card.

1.91.2   Command Mode

Card configuration

1.91.3   Syntax Description

auto

Specifies that the ports on this card automatically detect the speed and duplex mode of the segments to which they are connected; this setting is recommended and is the default for FE ports.

speed speed

FE port speed, according to one of the following keywords:


  • 10—10 Mbps

  • 100—100 Mbps

duplex mode

Port duplex mode, according to one of the following keywords:


  • half—Half-duplex mode

  • full—Full-duplex mode

1.91.4   Default

FE ports automatically sense the speed in full-duplex mode.

1.91.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the medium command to specify the speed and duplex mode for all FE ports on this FE-GE traffic card. Use the speed and duplex keywords to force the ports to use the specified speed and duplex mode.

Note:  
This command does not apply to the GE ports on this FE-GE traffic card.

Note:  
The FE ports do not come up if the medium speed or the duplex mode is configured incorrectly.

You can override the speed and mode settings for individual FE ports by using this command in port configuration mode.

Use the no or default form of this command to restore the default speed and duplex mode.

1.91.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the speed at 100 Mbps and full-duplex mode for all FE ports on the FE-GE traffic card in slot 4:

[local]Redback(config)#card fege-60-2-port 4

[local]Redback(config-port)#medium speed 100 duplex full

1.92   medium (ethernet)

medium {auto | speed speed duplex mode}

{no | default} medium

1.92.1   Purpose

Specifies the Ethernet port speed and duplex mode.

1.92.2   Command Mode

Port configuration

1.92.3   Syntax Description

auto

Specifies that the port automatically detects the speed and duplex mode of the segment to which it is connected; this setting is recommended and is the default for Ethernet ports on an 10/100 Ethernet or Fast Ethernet-Gigabit Ethernet (FE-GE) traffic card.

speed speed

Ethernet port speed, according to one of the following keywords:


  • 10—10 Mbps

  • 100—100 Mbps

duplex mode

Port duplex mode, according to one of the following keywords:


  • half—half-duplex mode

  • full—full-duplex mode

1.92.4   Default

10/100 Ethernet ports auto-sense the speed in full-duplex mode.

1.92.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the medium command to specify the Ethernet port speed and duplex mode. Use the speed and duplex keywords to force an Ethernet port to use the specified speed and duplex mode.

Note:  

Use the no or default form of this command to restore the default speed and duplex mode.

1.92.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the speed at 10 Mbps and full-duplex mode for port 1 in slot 4:

[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 4/1

[local]Redback(config-port)#medium speed 10 duplex full

1.93   medium-type

medium-type {copper | optical-fiber}

no medium-type {copper | optical-fiber}

1.93.1   Purpose

Specifies the physical interface for this native port on the SmartEdge 100 router.

1.93.2   Command Mode

Port configuration

1.93.3   Syntax Description

copper

Specifies the 1000Base-T interface.

optical-fiber

Specifies the 1000Base-FX interface; this is the default.

1.93.4   Default

1000Base-FX interface

1.93.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the medium-type command to specify the physical connection for this SmartEdge 100 native port. Each native port supports either a copper or an optical fiber connection. To configure the port, you must specify the type of connector to which the cable is attached; a mismatch causes the port to be inoperable. For example, if the cable is attached to the copper connector and you enter this command with the optical-fiber keyword, the port cannot transmit or receive traffic.

If you specify the copper keyword, you can also specify the port speed and duplex mode by using the duplex and speed commands (in port configuration mode).

Use the no form of this command to specify the default condition.

1.93.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the physical interface for native port 2/1 as optical-fiber:

[local]se100-01(config)#port ethernet 2/1

[local]se100-01(config-port)#medium-type optical-fiber

1.94   mep-local

mep-local mep-id {circuit | link-group} [vlan | transport] [direction]

{no | default} mep-local mep-id {circuit | link-group} [vlan | transport] [direction]

1.94.1   Purpose and Usage Guidelines

Binds an Ethernet link group, circuit, transport circuit, or port to a local maintenance association endpoint (MEP) in the current maintenance association (MA).

Use the following criteria to determine whether to classify a local MEP as up or down:

Use the mep-remotelist command to configure remote MEPs in the MA.

1.94.2   Command Mode

MA configuration

1.94.3   Syntax Description

mep-id

One of the MEPIDs defined by the mep-remotelist command. MEP IDs must be an integer in the range of 1 to 65535.

circuit

slot/port [:ch:sub]


Specifies the Ethernet circuit or port, to which the MEP binds.

link-group

lg {link-group-name | id link-group-id}


Specifies the link group to which the MEP binds.

vlan

vlan-id vlan-id


Specifies the Virtual LAN (VLAN) to which the MEP binds. The vlan-id argument is one of the following constructs:


  • pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value of a PVC (outer VLAN tag).

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value for the 802.1Q tunnel followed by the VLAN tag value for the PVC within the tunnel.


The range of values for any VLAN tag value is 1 to 4095. The vlan-id argument must also specify a PVC configured in the link group or port specified by the link-group or circuit arguments.

transport

transport {range | any}


Specifies the transport-enabled VLAN to which the MEP binds. The range argument must also specify a transport-enabled PVC or PVCs configured in the link group or port to which the MEP is bound. It is one of the following constructs:


  • pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value of a PVC (outer VLAN tag).

  • any — The entire range PVCs (outer VLAN tags).

  • pvc-vlan-id-first - pvc-vlan-id-last — A range of PVCs (outer VLAN tags).

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value for the 802.1Q tunnel followed by the VLAN tag value for the PVC within the tunnel.

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id-first - pvc-vlan-id-last — A range of PVCs (inner VLAN tags) within an 802.1Q tunnel (outer VLAN tag).

  • tunl-vlan-id:any — All PVCs within the specified 802.1Q tunnel (outer VLAN tag).

direction

direction up: Specifies that the local MEP resides in a bridge that transmits CFM Messages towards, and receives them from, the direction of the bridge relay. In other words for the current MA, incoming CFM messages pass through the bridge to reach the MEP bridge interface, and outgoing CFM pass through the bridge to reach other maintenance points in the MA.


direction down: Specifies that the local MEP resides in a bridge that transmits CFM Messages towards, and receives them from, the direction of the physical medium. In other words for the current MA, incoming and outgoing CFM messages reach the MEP bridge interface directly through the physical media and do not pass through the bridge.

1.94.4   Default

The default direction is up.

1.94.5   Examples

In the following example, MEPIDs 31 is associated with the Ethernet port 1 in slot 5 (5/1). This MEP is a local MEP in the sbc.com MA:

[local]Redback(config)#ethernet-cfm instance-1
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#level 4
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#domain-name sbc.com
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#disable-linktrace
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#group-mac 01:01:01:01:01:01
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#maintenance-association bayarea
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#ccm
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#frame-loss 10
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#std-interval 10ms
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#exit
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#mep-local 31 4/2 direction up

1.95   mep-remotelist

mep-remotelist id-first [through id-last]

{no | default} id-first [through id-last]

1.95.1   Purpose

Creates a sequence of IDs to be used to identify the remote maintenance association endpoints (MEPs) belonging to the current maintenance association (MA).

1.95.2   Command Mode

MA configuration

1.95.3   Syntax Description

id-first

The first maintenance association endpoint ID (MEPID) assigned to the remote MEPs in the MA. All maintenance points in the MD must be integers in the range of 1 to 8191 and must be unique within the MA.

through id-last

Specifies the last MEPID assigned to the remote MEPs in the MA.

1.95.4   Default

No MEPIDs.

1.95.5   Usage Guidelines

Use this command to create a sequence MEIDs to be used to identify the remote MEPs belonging to the current MA. MEP IDs must be an integer in the range of 1 to 65535.

All local MEPs in the MA should be bound to Ethernet ports or interfaces to Ethernet circuits using the mep-local command.

The following illustration shows the role that MEPs play in transmitting and terminating continuity check messages (CCMs). Although the drawing shows only one MEP transmitting CCM PDUs in the MA, all MEPs do this at regular intervals. See the ccm command for further information:

Figure 2   MEP Roles

1.95.6   Examples

The following example shows how to use this command to create the remote MEPIDs 301, 302, and 303 bayarea MA:

[local]Redback(config)#ethernet-cfm instance-1

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#level 4

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#domain-name sbc.com

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#disable-linktrace

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#group-mac 01:01:01:01:01:01

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#maintenance-association bayarea

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#ccm

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#frame-loss 10

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#std-interval 10ms

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#mep-local 31 4/2 direction up

[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#mep-remotelist 301 through 303

1.96   mesh-group

mesh-group group-name peer-addr

no mesh-group group-name peer-addr

1.96.1   Purpose

Configures a Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) peer to be a member of a mesh group.

1.96.2   Command Mode

MSDP router configuration

1.96.3   Syntax Description

group-name

Mesh group name.

peer-addr

IP address of the peer to be added to the mesh group.

1.96.4   Default

None

1.96.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mesh-group command to configure an MSDP peer to be a member of a mesh group.

Use the no form of this command to remove an MSDP peer’s membership from a mesh group.

1.96.6   Examples

The following example configures the MSDP peer with the IP address, 10.10.10.1, to be a member of the mesh group, foo:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router msdp

[local]Redback(config-msdp)#mesh-group foo 10.10.10.1

1.97   message

message string

no message

1.97.1   Purpose

Configures a message to display to the subscriber while the subscriber HTTP session is redirected to a preconfigured URL.

1.97.2   Command Mode

HTTP redirect profile configuration

1.97.3   Syntax Description

string

Optional. Printable ASCII characters string with up to 255 bytes and enclosed in quotation marks (“ ”). Specifies the message to display while redirecting the subscriber HTTP session to a preconfigured URL.

1.97.4   Default

A generic hardcoded message is used when redirecting the HTTP traffic.

1.97.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the message command to configure a message to display to the subscriber while the subscriber HTTP session is redirected to a preconfigured URL.

Use the no form of the message command to specify the default condition.

1.97.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure an HTTP redirect message for the HTTP-redirect profile ericsson:

[local]Redback(config)#http-redirect profile ericsson
[local]Redback(config-hr-profile)#message “Please wait while you are redirected to the portal server. Thank you.”

1.98   message-reordering

message-reordering message-queue queue-size

{no | default} message-reordering

1.98.1   Purpose

Queues incoming out-of-order L2TP packets until the expected next sequence packet is received.

1.98.2   Command Mode

L2TP-peer configuration

1.98.3   Syntax Description

message-queue queue-size

Whichever is smaller, queue-size argument or this command, or the L2TP received window, specifies the maximum number of L2TP packets that can be queued.

1.98.4   Default

Incoming out-of-order packets are dropped.

1.98.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the message-reordering command to queue incoming out-of-order L2TP packets until the expected next sequence packet is received. When the expected next sequence is received, the packets in the queue are forwarded and the queue is emptied.

The maximum value allowed for queue-size is 32. The effective queue size is the value specified by this command or the value specified for the received-window (tunnel-window command), whichever is smaller.

1.98.6   Examples

The following example shows the configuration of a context for LDP router operation with equal-cost multipath (ECMP). Since ECMP can cause L2TP packets to be received out-of-order, the L2TP-peer of a SmartEdge router is configured for message-reordering:

[local]lac1.net#config
[local]lac1.net(config)#context local
[local]lac1.net(config-ctx)#router ldp
[local]lac1.net(config-ldp)#ecmp-transit
!
[local]Redback#config
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#l2tp-peer name lac1.net media udp-ip remote ip 10.5.5.5
[local]Blue(config-l2tp)#max-tunnels 2
[local]Blue(config-l2tp)#message-reodering message-queue 16

1.99   metric

metric metric [level-1 | level-2]

{no | default} metric

1.99.1   Purpose

Configures the IS-IS interface metric for a specific address family.

1.99.2   Command Mode

IS-IS address family configuration

1.99.3   Syntax Description

metric

Metric used for calculating the Shortest Path First (SPF). The range of values is 1 to 63 for narrow-style metrics, and 0 to 16,777,215 for wide-style metrics; the default value is 10.

level-1

Optional. Configures the metric for IS-IS level 1 routing independently.

level-2

Optional. Configures the metric for IS-IS level 2 routing independently.

1.99.4   Default

The default metric value is 10.

1.99.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the metric command to configure the IS-IS interface metric for a specific address family.

Metric values are determined by circuit distance, load-sharing requirements, and other traffic engineering factors.

Use the no form of this command to remove the address family-specific IS-IS interface metric configuration. Use the default form of this command to return the metric configuration to the default value of 10.

1.99.6   Examples

This example shows how to assign the following IS-IS metrics to the fa4/1 interface:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#interface fa4/1

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#address-family ipv4 unicast

[local]Redback(config-isis-if-af)#metric 1234 level-2

[local]Redback(config-isis-if-af)#exit

Transaction Committed

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#address-family ipv6 unicast

[local]Redback(config-isis-if-af)#metric 123456

[local]Redback(config-isis-if-af)#exit

Transaction Committed

1.100   metric-style

metric-style [narrow | transition | wide] [level-1 | level-2]

no metric-style

1.100.1   Purpose

Allows the advertisement of short or wide metrics and migration of existing traditional Intermediate System-to-Intermediate-System (IS-IS) networks into the new scheme for each level.

1.100.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.100.3   Syntax Description

narrow

Optional. Allows advertisement of metrics with values in the range from 0 to 63. If enabled on a level, no device operating in wide mode can be present in the same area. All metrics from redistributed and calculated routing information is clipped to a maximum of 63.

transition

Optional. Allows advertisement of metrics with values in the range from 0 to 63. Higher metrics can be specified and redistributed, but are only used when the metric style is changed to wide mode. Devices with narrow or wide mode enabled can be present in the same area.

wide

Optional. Allows advertisement of metrics longer than 63. If enabled on a level, no device operating in narrow mode can be present in the same area.

level-1

Optional. Sets the metric style independently for level 1. If wide metric style is enabled, routes can be advertised from the level 2 area into the level 1 area, and level 1 devices can select the best level 2 device for each destination. If narrow mode is enabled, level 1 devices must forward traffic to the closest level 2 device.

level-2

Optional. Sets the metric style independently for level 2.

1.100.4   Default

For IS-IS levels 1 and 2, the SmartEdge router uses the wide metric for IP version 4 (IPv4) and IP version 6 (IPv6) routing.

1.100.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the metric-style command to allow the advertisement of short or wide metrics and migration of existing traditional IS-IS networks into the new scheme for each level. Implementation of this command adheres to the IETF draft-ietf-isis-traffic-02.txt document, IS-IS Extensions for Traffic Engineering.

You can enable the wide-style metric when traffic engineering capabilities or metrics longer than 63 are preferred. Other than any devices in transition mode, all devices in the area must apply the same metric style, otherwise the IP topology becomes partitioned.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default behavior.

1.100.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the metric style to transition for level-1 routing:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis isis01

[local]Redback(config-isis)#metric-style transition level-1

1.101   mic

mic mic-num {atm-oc3-2-port | fe-12-port | ge-2-port}

no mic mic-num {atm-oc3-2-port | fe-12-port | ge-2-port}

1.101.1   Purpose

Specifies the media interface card (MIC) type for the specified slot before the MIC is inserted into the SmartEdge 100 chassis and accesses MIC configuration mode.

1.101.2   Command Mode

Card configuration

1.101.3   Syntax Description

mic-num

MIC to be configured. The range of values is 1 to 2. MIC 1 is associated with ports 2/3 to 2/14. MIC 2 is associated with ports 2/15 to 2/26.

atm-oc3-2-port

Configures the specified MIC as an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) OC-3c/STM-1c MIC, with a maximum of 2 ports.

fe-12-port

Configures the specified MIC as a Fast Ethernet (FE) MIC, with a maximum of 12 ports.

ge-2-port

Configures the specified MIC as a Gigabit Ethernet (GE) MIC, with a maximum of 2 ports.

1.101.4   Default

No MICs are configured.

1.101.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mic command to specify the MIC type for the specified slot before the MIC is inserted into the SmartEdge 100 chassis. You cannot configure any ports on a MIC that is not yet physically present in the router until you enter this command.

If you have already installed a MIC in the SmartEdge 100 chassis, you can configure its ports without first entering this command. The SmartEdge OS automatically detects the MIC when you enter the port ethernet or the port atm command (in global configuration mode).

Note:  
The native ports on the SmartEdge 100 router (2/1 and 2/2) are not associated with a MIC; you configure them without entering this command.

The MIC type that you specify with this command must match the type of the installed MIC. A mismatch between the installed type and the specified keyword causes the system to display the mic mismatch error message.

Use the no form of this command to remove the MIC from the configuration.

1.101.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure MIC number 1 as an FE MIC:

[local]Redback(config-card)#mic 1 fe-12-port

The following example shows how to configure MIC number 2 as a GE MIC:

[local]Redback(config-card)#mic 2 ge-2-port

1.102   minimum-bandwidth

minimum-bandwidth number [kbps | mbps | gbps]

no bandwidth

1.102.1   Purpose

Configures the minimum bandwidth requirement for a label-switched path (LSP) to be applied as a constraint during Constrained Shortest Path First (CSPF) calculation.

1.102.2   Command Mode

Constraint configuration

1.102.3   Syntax Description

number

Minimum bandwidth for an LSP. If no unit is specified, the value is in bytes per second. The range of values is 1 to 4294967295.

kbps

Optional. Specifies that the minimum bandwidth requirement for an LSP is in kilobytes per second.

mbps

Optional. Specifies that the minimum bandwidth requirement for an LSP is in megabytes per second.

gbps

Optional. Specifies that the minimum bandwidth requirement for an LSP is in gigabytes per second.

1.102.4   Default

An LSP has no minimum bandwidth requirement.

1.102.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the minimum-bandwidth command to configure the minimum bandwidth requirement for an LSP to be applied as a constraint during CSPF calculation.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default condition.

1.102.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the minimum interface bandwidth required for an LSP to 3 megabytes per second:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp
[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#constraint constraint
[local]Redback(config-rsvp-constr)#minimum-bandwidth 3 mbps

1.103   minimum-links

minimum-links min-active

{no | default} minimum-links [min-active]

1.103.1   Purpose

Specifies the minimum number of active links that a link group must have for that link group to be in an up state.

1.103.2   Command Mode

Link group configuration

1.103.3   Syntax Description

min-active

Minimum number of active links that a link group must have for the link group to be in an up state. The range of values is 1 to 8 for an access link group and 1 to 255 for any other type of link group. The default value is 1 for any type of link group.

1.103.4   Default

The minimum number of active links is one for an access link group and eight for any other type of link group.

1.103.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the minimum-links command to specify the minimum number of active links that a link group must have for that link group to be in an up state.

You cannot specify a value for the min-active argument that is greater than the value you have specified for the max-active argument with the maximum-links command (in link group configuration mode).

If the number of active links falls below the number specified by the min-active argument, the system considers the link group to be down. One active link is needed to keep the link group in an up state.

An active (or working) link is defined as having an associated port, channel, or PVC in an up state. This command is typically used to specify when a link group is no longer considered viable after member links shut down. Whenever fewer than the specified number of links are working, the link group itself reverts to the down state and no longer forwards any traffic, even on the links that are working. As a result, the link group no longer appears in the routing table.

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default condition.

1.103.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the lg-ether link group with a minimum of 2 working links:

[local]Redback(config)#link-group lg-ether ether
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#minimum-links 2

1.104   minimum receive-interval

minimum receive-interval interval

{no | default} minimum receive-interval

1.104.1   Purpose

Specifies the minimum required interval, in milliseconds, between received Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) control packets that the system is capable of supporting.

1.104.2   Command Mode

1.104.3   Syntax Description

interval

Minimum required receive interval value. The range of values, in milliseconds, is 10 to 60000; the default value is 1000.

1.104.4   Default

The default minimum receive interval is 1,000 ms (1 second).

1.104.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the minimum receive-interval command to specify the minimum required interval, in milliseconds, between received BFD control packets that the system is capable of supporting.

Use the no or default form of this command to return the minimum required receive interval to 1,000 ms.

1.104.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the minimum required receive interval on the interface, to_foo, to 30 ms:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bfd

[local]Redback(config-bfd)#interface to_foo

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#minimum receive-interval 30

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#

1.105   minimum transmit-interval

minimum transmit-interval interval

{no | default} minimum transmit-interval

1.105.1   Purpose

Specifies the minimum desired transmit interval, in milliseconds, used by the local system when transmitting Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) control packets.

1.105.2   Command Mode

1.105.3   Syntax Description

interval

Minimum desired transmit interval value. The range of values, in milliseconds, is 10 to 60,000; the default value is 1,000.

1.105.4   Default

The default minimum desired transmit interval is 1,000 ms (1 second).

1.105.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the minimum transmit-interval command to specify the minimum desired transmit interval, in milliseconds, used by the local system when transmitting BFD control packets.

Use the no or default form of this command to return the minimum desired transmit interval to 1,000 ms.

1.105.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the minimum desired transmit interval on the interface, to_foo, to 30 ms:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bfd

[local]Redback(config-bfd)#interface to_foo

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#minimum transmit-interval 30

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#

1.106   min-wait

min-wait interval

{no | default} min-wait interval

1.106.1   Purpose

Configures the interval, in seconds, to wait before forwarding requests to the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server.

1.106.2   Command Mode

DHCP relay server configuration

1.106.3   Syntax Description

interval

Wait interval in seconds. The range of values is 0 to 60.

1.106.4   Default

The default wait interval is 0 seconds.

1.106.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the min-wait command to configure the interval, in seconds, to wait before forwarding requests to the DHCP server.

Use the no or default form of this command to return to the default DHCP relay server minimum wait interval of 0 seconds.

1.106.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure a wait interval of 45 seconds for DHCP relay server, 10.30.40.50:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#dhcp relay server 10.30.40.50

[local]Redback(config-dhcp-relay)#min-wait 45

[local]Redback(config-dhcp-relay)#

1.107   mip

mip mip-id {circuit | link-group} [vlan | transport]

{no | default} mip mip-id {circuit | link-group} [vlan | transport]

1.107.1   Purpose and Usage Guidelines

Creates a maintenance association intermediate point (MIP) bound to a specified Ethernet link group, circuit, transport circuit, or port in the current maintenance domain (MD).

You create a MIP for the following reasons:

1.107.2   Command Mode

CFM configuration

1.107.3   Syntax Description

mip-id

The ID assigned to the MIP in the MD. An integer in the range of 1 to 8191 and must be unique within the MD.

circuit

slot/port [:ch:sub]


Specifies the Ethernet circuit or port, to which the MIP binds.

link-group

lg {link-group-name | id link-group-id}


Specifies the link group to which the MIP binds.

vlan

vlan-id vlan-id


Specifies the Virtual LAN (VLAN) to which the MIP binds. The vlan-id argument is one of the following constructs:


  • pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value of a PVC (outer VLAN tag).

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value for the 802.1Q tunnel followed by the VLAN tag value for the PVC within the tunnel.


The range of values for any VLAN tag value is 1 to 4095. The vlan-id argument must also specify a PVC configured in the link group or port specified by the link-group or circuit arguments.

transport

transport {range | any}


Specifies the transport-enabled VLAN to which the MIP binds. The range argument must also specify a transport-enabled PVC or PVCs configured in the link group or port to which the MIP is bound. It is one of the following constructs:


  • pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value of a PVC (outer VLAN tag).

  • any — The entire range PVCs (outer VLAN tags).

  • pvc-vlan-id-first - pvc-vlan-id-last — A range of PVCs (outer VLAN tags).

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id — VLAN tag value for the 802.1Q tunnel followed by the VLAN tag value for the PVC within the tunnel.

  • tunl-vlan-id:pvc-vlan-id-first - pvc-vlan-id-last — A range of PVCs (inner VLAN tags) within an 802.1Q tunnel (outer VLAN tag).

  • tunl-vlan-id:any — All PVCs within the specified 802.1Q tunnel (outer VLAN tag).

1.107.4   Default

None.

1.107.5   Examples

In the following example, the mip command binds a MIP (in the redback.com MD) to the physical Ethernet port at slot 4/port 2:

[local]Redback(config)#ethernet-cfm instance-1
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#level 4
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#domain-name sbc.com
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#disable-linktrace
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#group-mac 01:01:01:01:01:01
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#maintenance-association bayarea
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#ccm
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#frame-loss 10
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#std-interval 10ms
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma-ccm)#exit
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#mep-local 31 4/2 direction up
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm-ma)#mep-remotelist 301 through 303
!
[local]Redback(config)#ethernet-cfm instance-2
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#level 5
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#domain-name redback.com
[local]Redback(config-ether-cfm)#mip 31 4/2

1.108   mirror destination

mirror destination dest-name {all | dropped | forwarded} [ip-datagrams | l2-frames] [header-only] [sampling interval]

no mirror destination

1.108.1   Purpose

Enables the mirroring of packets to an output destination.

1.108.2   Command Mode

1.108.3   Syntax Description

dest-name

Output destination name for mirrored traffic.

all

For Layer 2 Circuits: Ignored. All traffic is mirrored when forward policy dest in is applied. Only the forwarded traffic is mirrored when forward policy dest out is applied.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Mirrors all traffic.

dropped

For Layer 2 Circuits: Unsupported and rejected by the command line interface.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Mirrors only dropped packets. Packets dropped by IP checksums or by access control lists (ACLs) are not mirrored.

forwarded

For Layer 2 Circuits: Unsupported and rejected by the command line interface when forward policy dest in is applied. Only the forwarded traffic is mirrored when forward policy dest out is applied.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Mirrors only forwarded packets.

ip-datagrams

For Layer 2 Circuits: Optional (this is the default). Mirrors only IP packets. Mirrors IP datagrams of IP packets and omits the Layer 2 headers. Only IP datagram type data is included. If the mirror destination is a GRE tunnel, ip-datagrams must be selected.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Optional (this is the default). Mirrors only IP packets. Mirrors IP datagrams of IP packets and omits the Layer 2 headers. Only IP datagram type data is included.

l2-frames

For Layer 2 Circuits: Optional. Mirrors both IP and non-IP packets, including Layer 2 frame data with the MAC address and ethertype from the Layer 2 headers, from the packets on the Layer 2 attachment circuit specified in the configuration. All packets are mirrored when forward policy dest in is applied. Only the forwarded packets are mirrored when forward policy dest out is applied. If l2-frames is selected, the mirror destination must support Layer 2 mirroring. PPA2-based Ethernet cards support Layer 2 mirroring.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Unsupported and ignored.

header-only

For Layer 2 Circuits: Unsupported and ignored.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Optional. Mirrors only packet IP headers.

sampling interval

For Layer 2 Circuits: Optional. Configures a sampling interval. If this parameter is specified, traffic is mirrored on a periodic rather than continuous basis. The sampling interval is specified in milliseconds and determines the minimum amount of time that must pass after a packet is mirrored before a subsequent packet on the circuit is mirrored rather than ignored.


For Layer 3 Circuits: Optional. Configures a sampling interval. If this parameter is specified, traffic is mirrored on a periodic rather than continuous basis. The sampling interval is specified in milliseconds and determines the minimum amount of time that must pass after a packet is mirrored before a subsequent packet on the circuit is mirrored rather than ignored.

1.108.4   Default

Packets are not mirrored.

1.108.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mirror destination command to enable the mirroring of packets to an output destination. The destination name is the one that you specified for the circuit using the forward output command (in ATM PVC, Frame Relay PVC, tunnel, or port configuration mode). This command is used to capture traffic for troubleshooting and/or security.

Note:  
If LI (Lawful Intercept) and mirroring is configured on the same circuit, the packets will not be mirrored because LI takes precedence and only one replication can occur per packet.

Note:  
You can specify an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) permanent virtual circuit (PVC), an Ethernet port, a Frame Relay PVC, or a tunnel, or a Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) port as the output destination for default mirrored or redirected traffic.

Use the no form of this command to disable the mirroring of packets to an output destination.

Use the l2-frames keyword to mirror Layer 2 frame data, including MAC and PPP headers, from traffic on Layer 2 circuits (a circuit is a Layer 2 circuit if it is bound to a bridge/VPLS, XC, or L2VPN and a circuit is a Layer 3 circuit if it is bound to an IP interface).

When l2-frames is configured, the MAC and Ethertype data are preserved in the mirrored data; however, the original VLAN tags are overwritten by the mirror destination VLAN tags. Use the MAC address, session ID, or IP addresses to identify mirrored traffic streams because the original VLAN tags from the data are not preserved in the mirrored data.

The show configuration and show configuration forward command display l2-frames when l2-frames mirroring is configured.

The show forward policy pol-name command displays l2-frames when l2-frames mirroring is configured.

Note:  
Configurations that include the mirror destination command generated by the SmartEdge router, Release 6.1.4.2 and higher are not backward compatible with older releases (6.1.4.1 and earlier) even if ip-datagrams is not specified in the configuration because the default ip-datagrams command is automatically added to the show configuration output.

1.108.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure a policy, MirrorPolicy, which mirrors dropped packets every 3 seconds (3000 milliseconds) to the output destination, DroppedTraffic:

[local]Redback#config
[local]Redback(config)#forward policy MirrorPolicy
[local]Redback(config-policy-frwd)#mirror destination DroppedTraffic dropped sampling 3000

1.109   mkdir

mkdir url

1.109.1   Purpose

Creates a new directory on a local file system.

1.109.2   Command Mode

Exec (10)

1.109.3   Syntax Description

url

URL of the directory to be created.

1.109.4   Default

None

1.109.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mkdir command to create a new directory on the local file system.

When specifying a directory on the local file system, the URL takes the following form:

[/device][/directory].../directory

The value for the device argument can be flash, or if a mass-storage device is installed, md. If you do not specify the device argument, the default value is the device in the current working directory. If you do not specify the directory argument, the default value is the current directory. Directories can be nested. The value for the filename argument can be up to 256 characters in length.

1.109.6   Examples

The following example shows how to create a new top-level directory, backups, on the flash file system:

[local]Redback#mkdir /flash/backups

1.110   modify ip access-list

modify ip access-list acl-name condition cond-id {permit | deny}

1.110.1   Purpose

Modifies in real time the action for the specified condition referenced by statements in the IP access control list (ACL), without requiring reconfiguration of the IP ACL.

1.110.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.110.3   Syntax Description

acl-name

Name of the ACL to be modified.

condition cond-id

ACL condition ID in integer or IP address format. The ID range of values is 1 to 4294967295.

permit

Applies a permit action.

deny

Applies a deny action.

1.110.4   Default

None

1.110.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the modify ip access-list command to modify in real time the action for the specified condition referenced by statements in the IP ACL, without requiring reconfiguration of the IP ACL.

Note:  
If the specified condition ID is already configured (using the condition command in access control list configuration mode), the modify ip access-list command is ignored. If a condition ID is configured using the condition command and the changes are saved, any condition ID that may be currently applied using the modify ip access-list command at runtime is immediately overwritten.

For information about the condition and ip access-list commands in context configuration mode, see the Command List.

1.110.6   Examples

With the following configuration, using the modify ip access-list list_cond condition 200 deny command changes the action of the ACL condition 200 in statement 20 in the IP ACL list_cond from permit to deny. However, using the modify ip access-list list_cond condition 100 permit command does not affect the deny action of the ACL condition 100 because it has already been configured:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip access-list list_cond
[local]Redback(config-access-list)#condition 100 time-range
[local]Redback(config-acl-condition)#absolute start 2005:01:01:01:00 end 2006:01:01:01:01 permit
[local]Redback(config-acl-condition)#exit
[local]Redback(config-access-list)#seq 10 deny tcp any any eq 80 cond 100
[local]Redback(config-access-list)#seq 20 permit tcp any any eq 81 cond 200

1.111   modify policy access-list

modify policy access-list acl-name condition cond-id class class-name

1.111.1   Purpose

Modifies in real time the action for the specified condition referenced by statements in the policy access control list (ACL), without requiring reconfiguration of the policy ACL.

1.111.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.111.3   Syntax Description

acl-name

Name of the ACL to be modified.

condition cond-id

ACL condition ID in integer or IP address format. The ID range of values is 1 to 4294967295.

class class-name

Class name applied to statements in the policy ACL.

1.111.4   Default

None

1.111.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the modify policy access-list command to modify in real time the action for the specified condition referenced by statements in the policy ACL, without requiring reconfiguration of the policy ACL.

Note:  
If the specified condition ID is already configured (using the condition command in access control list configuration mode), the modify policy access-list command is ignored. If a condition ID is configured using the condition command and the changes are saved, any condition ID that may be currently applied using the modify policy access-list command at runtime is immediately overwritten.

1.111.6   Examples

With the following configuration, using the modify policy access-list list_cond condition 200 deny command will change the action of the ACL condition, 200, in statement 20 in the IP ACL, list_cond, from permit to deny. However, using the modify policy access-list list_cond condition 100 permit command will not affect the deny action of the ACL condition, 100, because it has already been configured:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#policy access-list list_cond
[local]Redback(config-access-list)#condition 100 time-range
[local]Redback(config-acl-condition)#absolute start 2005:01:01:01:00 end 2006:01:01:01:01 permit
[local]Redback(config-acl-condition)#exit
[local]Redback(config-access-list)#seq 10 deny tcp any any eq 80 cond 100
[local]Redback(config-access-list)#seq 20 permit tcp any any eq 81 cond 200

1.112   monitor duration

monitor duration seconds

no monitor duration

1.112.1   Purpose

Sets the duration of the system monitoring process.

1.112.2   Command Mode

Global configuration

1.112.3   Syntax Description

seconds

Amount of time, in seconds, that system monitoring lasts. The range of values is 1 to 65535; the default value is 600.

1.112.4   Default

The default duration of system monitoring is 600 seconds, or 10 minutes.

1.112.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor duration command to set the duration of the monitoring process, enabled through any of the monitor commands (available in exec mode). For additional information, see the Command List.

Use the no form of this command to set the monitor duration to its default value of 600 seconds.

1.112.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the monitor duration to 3600 seconds, or 60 minutes:

[local]Redback(config)#monitor duration 3600

1.113   monitor ip

monitor ip route summary

1.113.1   Purpose

Monitors the current status of IP processes and provides continuous updates to the status.

1.113.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.113.3   Syntax Description

route

Specifies that Routing Information Base (RIB) information is to be monitored.

summary

Specifies that summaries of all routes are to be provided.

1.113.4   Default

None

1.113.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor ip command to monitor the current status of IP processes and to provide periodic updates on status changes.

Press Ctrl+C to exit monitoring mode.

1.113.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable monitoring of the RIB process and provides status for the process:

[local]Redback>monitor ip route summary
Rt Tbl Version:      765133, Nh Tbl Version: 19580
FIB Rt Tbl Version:  765133
Route Source                 Tot-Routes     Act-Routes  Max Ever Reached

Connected                              5              5               5
Static                                 3              3               3
Isis-Level 1                          34             30              76
Isis-Level 2                          17             17              59
Ospf-IntraArea                         7              3               7
IBGP                               19122          19122           20293
EBGP                               82165          82165          101511

% enter ctrl-C to exit monitor mode, monitor duration(sec): 600    (00:00:10) 

1.114   monitor isis adjacency

monitor isis [multicast] adjacency [detail]

1.114.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) neighbors.

1.114.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.114.3   Syntax Description

multicast

Optional. Displays IS-IS multicast topology.

detail

Optional. Displays additional information about IS-IS neighbors.

1.114.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified. Updates occur every two seconds.

1.114.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor isis adjacency command to continuously display updated information about IS-IS neighbors. This information is automatically updated every two seconds. Monitoring continues for the number of seconds specified in the monitor duration command. The default duration is 600 seconds. For information on the monitor duration command, see the Command List.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

Table 16 describes the output fields for the monitor isis adjacency command.

Table 16    Field Descriptions for the monitor isis adjacency Command

Field

Description

SystemId

ID of an IS-IS in an area.

Interface

Interface advertising the IS-IS.

L

Level 1 routing only (1), level 2 routing only (2), or levels 1 and 2 (3) routing.

MT

Multi-topology. Indicates whether each IS-IS instance performs unicast (U), multicast (M), or unicast and multicast (UM) topology-based routing. Displays no value when the default routing topology, unicast, is used.

State

IS-IS adjacency state.

Holdtime

Amount of time, in seconds, before an adjacency timeout occurs.

SNPA

Subnetwork Point of Attachment (SNPA) or the data-link address of the remote system.

Uptime

Amount of time that the adjacency has been up.

1.114.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor isis adjacency command:

[local]Redback>monitor isis adjacency
IS-IS Adjacency:

SystemId   Interface  L MT   State  Holdtime  SNPA            Uptime

a3-ngp     1/1        1      Up     25        0010.7bcc.4b7e  00:01:11

a4-ngp     2/1        2      Up     27        0010.7bcc.4b7e  00:04:33

a5-ngp     3/1        1      Up     29        0050.732e.afd8  00:02:03



Total IS-IS Adjacencies:   3

The following example displays output from the monitor isis adjacency detail command:

[local]Redback>monitor isis adjacency detail
IS-IS Adjacency:

SystemId   Interface  L MT   State  Holdtime  SNPA            Uptime

a3-ngp     1/1        1      Up     25        0010.7bcc.4b7e  00:09:10

  Area Address(es): 49.0002  49.0003

  IP Address(es): 192.168.1.5*

a4-ngp     1/1        1      Up     28        0010.7bcc.4b7e  00:12:32

  Area Address(es): 49.0002

  IP Address(es): 192.168.1.5*

a6-ngp     2/1        1      Up     28        0050.732e.afd8  00:10:02

  Area Address(es): 49.0002  49.0003

  IP Address(es): 192.168.1.6*
Total IS-IS Adjacencies:    3

1.115   monitor isis interfaces

monitor isis [multicast] interfaces [if-name] [detail]

1.115.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) interfaces.

1.115.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.115.3   Syntax Description

multicast

Optional. Displays IS-IS multicast topology.

if-name

Optional. Interface name. Displays information only for the specified interface.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed IS-IS interface information.

1.115.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified. Updates occur every two seconds.

1.115.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor isis interfaces command to display continuously updated information about interfaces configured with IS-IS. This information is automatically updated every two seconds. Monitoring continues for the number of seconds specified in the monitor duration command. The default duration is 600 seconds. For information on the monitor duration command, see the Command List.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

Table 17 describes the output fields for the monitor isis interface command.

Table 17    Field Descriptions for the monitor isis interface Command

Field

Description

Interface

Interface advertising the IS-IS.

L

Level 1 routing only (1), level 2 routing only (2), or levels 1 and 2 (3) routing.

MT

Multi-topology. Indicates whether each IS-IS instance performs unicast (U), multicast (M), or unicast and multicast (UM) topology-based routing. Displays no value when the default routing topology, unicast, is used.

State

IS-IS adjacency state.

Level-1-DR

IS-IS level 1 designated router (DR) for the interface.

Level-2-DR

IS-IS level 1 designated router (DR) for the interface.

Metric

Routing metric. A value inside the brackets is a multicast metric, and a value without brackets, or outside the brackets, is a unicast metric.

1.115.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor isis interfaces command:

[local]Redback>monitor isis interfaces
IS-IS interface(s) for tag A2-wtn:
Interface    L  MT   State  Level-1-DR        Level-2-DR        Metric
1/1          3  UM   Up     a2-wtn.01         a2-wtn.01         10
2/1          3  UM   Up     A1-WTN-3600.02    A1-WTN-3600.02    12[10]
3/1          3  UM   Down   a2-wtn.03         a2-wtn.03         12[10]
4/1          3  UM   Up     a2-wtn.03         a2-wtn.03         27[10]

The following example displays output from the monitor isis interfaces detail command:

[local]Redback>monitor isis interfaces detail
IS-IS interface(s) for tag test:
redback
Up, Level: 3, Ckt Id: 6, lan, ucast-mcast, IP address: 10.53.36.107/21, Grid:0x10000001 
 Level  Adjs Priority  Hello  Hold  Auth Blocked  Metric
 1      0    64        5      24                  10
 1      0    64        3      24                  10
gre0
Up, Level: 3, Ckt Id: 6, lan, ucast-mcast, IP address: 10.53.36.107/21, Grid:0x10000001 
 Level  Adjs Priority  Hello  Hold  Auth Blocked  Metric
 1      0    64        7      30                  27
 1      0    64        3      30                  27

Total IS-IS Interface(s):   2

1.116   monitor isis statistics

monitor isis [multicast] statistics [detail]

1.116.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) traffic statistics.

1.116.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.116.3   Syntax Description

multicast

Optional. Displays IS-IS multicast topology.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed IS-IS traffic statistics.

1.116.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified. Updates occur every two seconds.

1.116.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor isis statistics command to display continuously updated information about IS-IS traffic statistics. This information is automatically updated every two seconds. Monitoring continues for the number of seconds specified in the monitor duration command. The default duration is 600 seconds. For information on the monitor duration command, see the Command List.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

1.116.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor isis statistics command:

[local]Redback>monitor isis statistics



IS-IS Router tag A2-wtn:

System Id: a2-wtn               Type: Level-1   SPF runs: 299

PDU Type      Received      Processed    Drops       Sent

LSP           2290          2290         0           2515

IIH           91580         91580        0           52756

CSNP          18701         18701        0           17916

PSNP          6             6            0           4

                                Type: Level-2    SPF runs: 366

PDU Type      Received      Processed    Drops       Sent

LSP           5362          5360         2           4502

IIH           91580         91580        0           52787

CSNP          18709         18708        1           17904

PSNP          3             3            0           3

Total         115654        228228       3           75196



Unknown Packets Received: 1

Total Received: 228232; Total Sent: 148387

The following example displays output from the monitor isis statistics detail command:

[local]Redback>monitor isis statistics detail



IS-IS Router tag A2-wtn:

System Id: a2-wtn               Type: Level-1   SPF runs: 299

PDU Type      Received      Processed    Drops       Sent

LSP           2290          2290         0           2515

IIH           91580         91580        0           52756

CSNP          18701         18701        0           17916

PSNP          6             6            0           4

                                Type: Level-2    SPF runs: 366

PDU Type      Received      Processed    Drops       Sent

LSP           5362          5360         2           4502

IIH           91580         91580        0           52787

CSNP          18709         18708        1           17904

PSNP          3             3            0           3

Total         115654        228228       3           75196



isis kernel stats:

        228272 packets received

        148400 packets sent

        0 incoming packets dropped

        0 packets with bad outgoing interface 

1.117   monitor ospf interface

monitor ospf interface

1.117.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) interfaces.

1.117.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.117.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.117.4   Default

Updates occur every two seconds.

1.117.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor ospf interface command to display continuously updated information about OSPF interfaces. This information is automatically updated every two seconds.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

1.117.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor ospf interface command:

[local]Redback>monitor ospf interface



--- OSPF Interfaces for Instance 64001/Router ID 10.100.1.5 ---
ddr            Len  Network Type    Cost    Priority State    Area

0.100.11.10    29   broadcast       1       1        DR       0.0.0.0

0.100.11.27    29   broadcast       1       1        BDR      0.0.0.11

0.100.11.49    29   broadcast       1       1        BDR      0.0.0.11

1.118   monitor ospf neighbor

monitor ospf neighbor

1.118.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about Open Shortest First Path (OSPF) neighbors.

1.118.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.118.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.118.4   Default

Updates occur every two seconds.

1.118.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor ospf neighbor command to display continuously updated information about OSPF neighbors. This information is automatically updated every two seconds.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

1.118.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor ospf neighbor command:

[local]Redback>monitor ospf neighbor

--- OSPF Neighbors for Instance 64001/Router ID 10.100.1.5 ---
NeighborID      NeighborAddress Pri State    DR-State IntfAddress     TimeLeft
10.100.1.1      10.100.11.9     1   Full     BDR      10.100.11.10    30
10.100.1.3      10.100.11.25    1   Full     DR       10.100.11.27    38
10.100.1.102    10.100.11.50    1   Full     DR       10.100.11.49    35

1.119   monitor ospf spf last

monitor ospf spf last

1.119.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about the most recent Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Shortest Path First (SPF) calculation.

1.119.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.119.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.119.4   Default

Updates occur every two seconds.

1.119.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor ospf spf last command to display continuously updated information about the most recent OSPF SPF calculation. This information is automatically updated every two seconds.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

1.119.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor ospf spf last command:

[local]Redback>monitor ospf spf last

--- Most Recent OSPF SPF Route Calculation ---

When (elapsed)  Instance/Area         Phase     Duration
00:20:23        64001/N/A             External  < 10 ms
00:20:23        64001/0.0.0.0         Summary   < 10 ms
00:20:23        64001/0.0.0.0         Intra     < 10 ms
00:20:23        64001/0.0.0.11        Intra     < 10 ms

1.120   monitor ospf statistics

monitor ospf statistics [instance-id] [interface {ip-addr | if-name} | neighbor ip-addr [interface {ip-addr | if-name}]]

1.120.1   Purpose

Displays continuously updated information about Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) statistics.

1.120.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.120.3   Syntax Description

instance-id

Optional. OSPF instance ID. Monitors statistics for the specified OSPF instance. The range of values is 1 to 65,535.

interface ip-addr

Optional. Interface IP address. Monitors statistics on the specified interface. When used with the neighbor ip-addr construct, monitors statistics on the specified interface for the neighbor.

interface if-name

Optional. Interface name. Monitors statistics on the specified interface. When used with the neighbor ip-addr construct, monitors statistics on the specified interface for the neighbor.

neighbor ip-addr

Optional. Neighbor IP address. Monitors statistics for the specified neighbor.

1.120.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified. Updates occur every two seconds.

1.120.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor ospf statistics command to display continuously updated information about OSPF statistics. This information is automatically updated every two seconds.

Press Ctrl+C to stop displaying information.

1.120.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the monitor ospf statistics command:

[local]Redback>monitor ospf statistics



--- OSPF Statistics for Instance 64001 ---



x flood queue length   : 3           Interval            : 5d 16:49:59

As received            : 6705        LSAs sent           : 6513

As changes received    : 536

Packet Retransmissions : 63          LSA Retransmissions : 105

Minutes downloaded     : 78          Routes deleted      : 62

Download Errors        : 0           RIB IPC messages    : 88



            Hello    DD       LSR      LSU      ACK

      Sent  147867   99       23       3917     3065

      Recv  143087   80       28       3290     2913

1.121   monitor port

For ports on channelized OC-12 or STM-1 traffic cards, the syntax is:

monitor port {counters [persistent] | traffic} slot[/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]]]

For channelized ports on DS-3 or E1 traffic cards, the syntax is:

monitor port {counters [persistent] | traffic} slot[/port[:chan-num]]

For all other traffic cards and all media interface cards (MICs), the syntax is:

monitor port {counters [persistent] | traffic} slot[/port]

1.121.1   Purpose

Monitors the current status of one or more ports or channels and provides continuous updates to the status.

1.121.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.121.3   Syntax Description

counters

Displays port counters.

persistent

Optional. If omitted, displays values since the counters were last cleared or the card was last reloaded. If specified, displays values since the system was last reloaded.

traffic

Displays values for traffic.

slot

Chassis slot number of the traffic card for which monitoring is requested.

port

Optional. Port number for which monitoring is requested. If omitted, monitors all ports on the specified traffic card.

chan-num

Optional. Channel number for which monitoring is requested. If omitted, monitors all channels on the specified port. The range of values depends on the type of port see Table 18 for the range of values.

sub-chan-num

Optional. Subchannel number for which monitoring is requested. If omitted, monitors all subchannels in the specified channel. The range of values depends on the type of port; see Table 18 for the range of values.

1.121.4   Default

None

1.121.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor port command to monitor the current status of one or more ports or channels and to provide periodic updates on status changes.

Note:  
The SmartEdge 100 router limits the value of the slot argument to 2.

Note:  

The value for the port argument on the SmartEdge 100 router is either of the following:


Table 18 lists the range of values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num arguments for various types of channelized ports.

Table 18    Range of Values for the chan-num and sub-chan-num Arguments

Port

Channel Types

chan-num Range

sub-chan-num Range

Channelized OC-12

DS-3, DS-1

1 to 12

1 to 28

Channelized STM-1

E1, DS-0 channel group

1 to 63

1 to 31

Channelized DS-3

DS-1

1 to 28

Channelized E1

DS-0 channel group

1 to 31

Press Ctrl+C to exit monitoring mode.

1.121.6   Examples

The following example shows how to monitor the port counters for an Ethernet port:

[local]Redback>monitor port counters 5/1
This may adversely impact system performance
% enter ctrl-C to exit monitor mode, monitor duration(sec): 600 (00:00:02)
Port            Type                      Pkts/Bytes Sent  Pkts/Bytes Received
5/1             ethernet                                3                    0
                                                      126                    0

The following example shows how to monitor the port traffic for an Ethernet port:

[local]Redback>monitor port traffic 5/1
This may adversely impact system performance
% enter ctrl-C to exit monitor mode, monitor duration(sec): 600 (00:00:00)
Port            Type                       Output pps/bps        Input pps/bps
5/1             ethernet                                0                    0

The following example shows how to monitor the port traffic for all channels on a channelized DS-3 port:

[local]Redback>monitor port traffic 2/1
This may adversely impact system performance
% enter ctrl-C to exit monitor mode, monitor duration(sec): 600 (00:00:00)
Port          Type                   Output pps/bps        Input pps/bps
2/1           channelized-ds3                                           
  2/1:1       ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16
  2/1:5       ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16
  2/1:6       ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16
  2/1:7       ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16
  2/1:8       ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16
  2/1:15      ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16
  2/1:16      ds1                                 0                    0
                                                 16                   16

1.122   monitor process

monitor process[proc-name] [{crash-info | detail}]

1.122.1   Purpose

Monitors the current status of a specified category of processes, and provides continuous updates to the status.

1.122.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.122.3   Syntax Description

proc-name

Optional. Process that you want to monitor. The value of the proc-name argument can be any one of the keywords listed in Table 19.

crash-info

Optional. Specifies that process crash information is to be monitored.

detail

Optional. Specifies that detailed process information is to be displayed.

1.122.4   Default

Monitors all processes and displays summary information if no optional keywords are specified.

1.122.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the monitor process command to monitor the current status of system processes and to provide periodic updates on status changes.

Table 19 lists the keywords for the processes supported by this command.

Table 19    Keywords for Processes

Keyword

Process

aaad

Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) process

arp

Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) process

atm

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) process

bgp

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) process

bridge

Bridge process

cfm

Ethernet 802.1ag CFM process

clips

Clientless IP service selection process

cls

Classifier Manager process

cpustats

Display CPU statistics

csm

Controller State Manager (CSM) process

dhcp

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) relay/proxy process

dhcpv6

DHCPv6 process

dhelperd

DHCP helper daemon

dhelperd6

DHCPv6 helper daemon

dlm

Download Manager (DLM) process

dns

Domain Name System (DNS) process

dot1q

802.1Q encapsulation process(1)

flowd

Flow process(2)

fr

Frame Relay process (3)

fsd

File Server manager

fssbcsim

FSSB Client simulator

gsmp

General Switch Management Protocol (GSMP) process

hr

HTTP redirect process

igmp

Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) process

isis

Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) process

ism

Interface and Circuit State Manager (ISM) process

l2tp

Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) process

l4l7

L4L7 process

ldp

Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) process

lg

Link group (LG) process

lm

Label Manager (LM) process

metad

META process

mgd

Media Gateway process

mgmd

Media Gateway Manager process

mip

Mobile IP process

mipsim

Mobile IP Simulator process

mpls_static

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) static process

msdp

Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) process

nat

IP Network Address Translation (NAT) process

nd

Neighbor discovery (ND) process

netopd

NetOp process daemon

ntp

Network Time Protocol (NTP) process

odd

On-demand diagnostics (ODD) process

ospf

Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol process

ospf3

OSPF Version 3 (OSPF3) protocol process

ped_parse

Process execution descriptor (PED) parse process

pem

Privacy-enhanced mail (PEM) process

pim

Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) process

ppaslog

Packet Processing ASIC (PPA) syslog process

ppp

Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) process

pppoe

PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) process

qos

Quality of service (QoS) process

rcm

Router Configuration Manager (RCM) process

rib

Routing Information Base (RIB) process

rip

Routing Information Protocol (RIP) process

rpm

Router Policy Manager (RPM) process

rsvp

Resource Reservation Protocol Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) process

sctp

SCTP process

shm_ribd

Shared Memory RIB process

snmp

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) process

static

Static routing process

stats

Statistics process

sysmon

System monitor process

tunnel

Tunnel management process

vrrp

Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) process

xcd

Cross-connect process daemon

(1)  The SmartEdge 100 router does not support 802.1Q.

(2)  Not all controller cards support flow.

(3)  The SmartEdge 100 router does not support Frame Relay.


Updates occur every two seconds. Monitoring continues for the number of seconds specified by the monitor duration command (in global configuration mode). The default duration is 600 seconds.

Use the monitor process command without any keywords to monitor all system processes, or use the appropriate keyword to monitor a specific category of processes.

Press Ctrl+C to exit monitoring mode.

1.122.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable monitoring of the RIP process and provide status for the process:

[local]Redback>monitor process rip
% enter ctrl-C to exit monitor mode, monitor duration(sec): 5600 (00:00:08)

NAME          PID    SPAWN      MEMORY  TIME         %CPU   STATE
rip           12652      1      576K    00:00:00.02  0.00%  run 

1.123   more

more url

1.123.1   Purpose

Displays the contents of a file on the local file system, one page at a time.

1.123.2   Command Mode

Exec

1.123.3   Syntax Description

url

URL of the file to be displayed.

1.123.4   Default

None

1.123.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the more command to display the contents of a file on the local file system, one page at a time.

At the end of each page, the SmartEdge router prints “--More--” to indicate the presence of more output. You can use a subset of the commands available in the UNIX more(1) command, such as pressing Space to show the next page of output, pressing Enter to show one additional line of output, or typing q, to end the display.

When referring to a file on the local file system, the URL takes the following form:

[/device][/directory]/filename.ext

The value for the device argument can be flash, or if a mass-storage device is installed, md. If you do not specify the device argument, the default value is the device in the current working directory. If you do not specify the directory argument, the default value is the current directory. Directories can be nested. The value for the filename argument can be up to 256 characters in length.

1.123.6   Examples

The following example displays the contents of the file, /flash/redback.cfg. At the prompt, the user ends the display by entering q:

[local]Redback>more /flash/redback.cfg
context local

!

 interface 1/1

  ip address 10.5.1.2/16

  ip router isis tag

!

 interface 2/1

  ip address 10.7.1.1/16

  ip router isis tag

--More--q

[local]Redback#

1.124   mount /md

mount /md

1.124.1   Purpose

Mounts a mass-storage device that has been inserted in the external slot of a controller card.

1.124.2   Command Mode

Exec (10)

1.124.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.124.4   Default

None

1.124.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mount /md command to mount a mass-storage device. You must enter this command from the command-line interface (CLI) that is running on the controller card with the device to be mounted.

When you insert a mass-storage device into the external slot of a controller card, the system mounts it for you; you do not need to enter this command. However, if the show disk command (in any mode) indicates that the device is not mounted, you can enter this command to mount it. Failure to mount a mass-storage device is also recorded in the log messages.

The following guidelines apply to file management for mass-storage devices:

To transfer the files written to the /md directory on the NetBSD compact-flash card while the mass-storage device was unmounted, perform the following steps:

  1. Before you mount the mass-storage device (or insert it in the external slot on the controller card), create a temporary directory in the local file system on the NetBSD compact-flash card for the files you need to transfer; for example:
[local]Redback#mkdir /flash/temp
  1. Transfer the files from the /md directory to the directory you have created; for example:
[local]Redback#copy /md/newconfig.cfg /flash/temp/newconfig.cfg
  1. Delete the files in the /md directory to recover the file space; for example:
[local]Redback#delete /md/newconfig.cfg
  1. Insert the device in the external slot on the controller card and check its status; for example:
[local]Redback#show disk

Filesystem  512-blocks     Used    Avail Capacity  Mounted on

NetBSD          362526   133210   211188    38%    /

Microdrive     1021244    54118   916062     5%    /md
  1. If the status does not indicate that the device was mounted, mount the device; for example:
[local]Redback#mount /md
  1. Transfer the files from the temporary directory you created on the internal compact-flash card to a directory on the device; for example:
[local]Redback#copy /flash/temp/newconfig.cfg /md/myconfg/newconfig.cfg
  1. Delete the files and the temporary directory to recover the file space; for example:
[local]Redback#delete /flash/temp/newconfig.cfg

[local]Redback#rmdir /flash/temp

To transfer the files to the mass-storage device on the other controller card, perform the following steps:

  1. Connect to the CLI running on the other controller card; for example, to the standby controller card.
  2. Transfer the files; for example:
[local]standby#copy mate /md/myconfg/newconfig.cfg /md/myconfg/newconfig.cfg

1.124.6   Examples

The following example shows how to mount the mass-storage device installed in the active controller card:

[local]Redback#mount /md 

1.125   move-frequency

move-frequency moves-per-sec

no move-frequency

1.125.1   Purpose

Sets the threshold above which a bridging loop is declared.

1.125.2   Command Mode

Loop-detection configuration

1.125.3   Syntax Description

moves-per-sec

Moves per second. The range of values is 0 to 65535, where 0 specifies no limit is placed on the move frequency.

1.125.4   Default

0 (blocking is never applied)

1.125.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the move-frequency command to set the threshold above which a bridging loop is declared; that is, when the frequency threshold (MAC moves per second) is reached or exceeded, the loop-detection process blocks circuits that have been designated as available until the loop is no longer observed.

The priority command specifies order in which circuits are available for blocking.

Use the no form of this command to return the move-frequency to its default.

1.125.6   Examples

The following examples shows how to set the move frequency threshold .

[local]Redback(config)#context ink

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#bridge lbdl

[local]Redback(config-bridge)#loop-detection

[local]Redback(config-ld)#move-frequency 20000