COMMAND DESCRIPTION     12/190 82-CRA 119 1170/1-V1 Uen E    

Commands: mp through n

© Ericsson AB 2010. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List

SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

Contents

1Command Descriptions
1.1mp endpoint-discriminator
1.2mpls
1.3mpls shortcuts
1.4mpls to qos
1.5mpls traffic-engineering
1.6mpls use-ethernet
1.7mpls use-ip
1.8mp mrru
1.9mrinfo
1.10mrouter
1.11mtrace
1.12mtu (ATM, Ethernet, POS)
1.13mtu (card)
1.14mtu (channel)
1.15mtu (tunnel)
1.16multicast adjust-qos-rate
1.17multicast adjust-qos-rate delay-interval
1.18multicast destination
1.19multicast output
1.20multicast rate-limit
1.21multi-paths
1.22multi-topology transition
1.23nak-on-subnet-deletion
1.24national
1.25native-vlan-tag
1.26nat policy
1.27nat policy-name
1.28nbns
1.29nd profile
1.30neighbor
1.31neighbor (BFD)
1.32neighbor (BGP)
1.33neighbor (OSPF)
1.34neighbor password
1.35neighbor profile
1.36neighbor targeted
1.37neighbor (VPLS)
1.38net
1.39netop
1.40network
1.41network-type
1.42next-hop
1.43next-hop-on-lsp
1.44next-hop-self
1.45nexthop triggered
1.46nexthop triggered delay
1.47nexthop triggered holdtime
1.48no debug all
1.49notify
1.50ns-retry-interval
1.51nssa-range
1.52ntp-broadcast
1.53ntp-mode
1.54num-queues


1   Command Descriptions

Commands starting with “mp” through commands starting the “n” are included.

1.1   mp endpoint-discriminator

mp endpoint-discriminator {hostname | ip | user-defined text}

{no | default} mp endpoint-discriminator

1.1.1   Purpose

Specifies the type of endpoint discriminator to be used for negotiation for a Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (MP) bundle.

1.1.2   Command Mode

1.1.3   Syntax Description

hostname

Specifies the system hostname of the SmartEdge® router.

ip

Specifies the IP address assigned to the interface to which you bind the MP bundle.

user-defined text

User-defined endpoint discriminator. The text argument is a string of up to 20 characters.

1.1.4   Default

The endpoint discriminator is the system hostname.

1.1.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mp endpoint-discriminator command to specify the endpoint discriminator to be used for negotiation for an MP bundle. The endpoint discriminator identifies peers to the system and distinguishes peers from one another in the system. This identification ensures that the correct links are bundled together in the same MP bundle.

Note:  
This command is applicable only to an MP bundle.

Use the no or default form of this command to return the endpoint discriminator identification to the system hostname.

1.1.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the endpoint discriminator as the IP address of the interface to which the MP bundle will be bound:

[local]Redback(config)#link-group lg-multi mp
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#mp endpoint-discriminator ip
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#exit

1.2   mpls

mpls {encrypted 1 | password} password

no mpls

1.2.1   Purpose

Enables Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) features and functions.

1.2.2   Command Mode

1.2.3   Syntax Description

encrypted1

Specifies that the password that follows is encrypted.

password

Specifies that the password that follows is not encrypted.

password

Paid license password that is required to enable MPLS features and functions. The password argument is unique for MPLS and is provided at the time the software license is paid. Optional only when using the no form.

1.2.4   Default

MPLS features and functions are disabled.

1.2.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mpls command to enable MPLS features and functions. You can specify the password argument in either encrypted or unencrypted form. Neither form displays by the show configuration command command (in any mode). For more information on the show configuration command, see Using the CLI.

Use the no form of this command to disable MPLS features and functions. A password is not required if you are disabling the license for MPLS features and functions; it is ignored if entered.

1.2.6   Examples

The following example licenses MPLS. The password is in an unencrypted form:

[local]Redback(config-license)#mpls password mpls-password

1.3   mpls shortcuts

mpls shortcuts

1.3.1   Purpose

Enables the use of Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) label-switched paths (LSPs) as intra-area next hops.

1.3.2   Command Mode

OSPF router configuration

1.3.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.3.4   Default

The use of MPLS LSPs is disabled.

1.3.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mpls shortcuts command to enable the use of MPLS LSPs as intra-area next hops.

1.3.6   Examples

The following example enables the use of MPLS LSPs as intra-area next hops:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ospf

[local]Redback(config-ospf)#mpls shortcuts

1.4   mpls to qos

mpls {exp-value | all} to qos pd-value

default mpls {exp-value | all}

1.4.1   Purpose

Translates Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) values to packet descriptor (PD) quality of service (QoS) values on ingress.

1.4.2   Command Mode

class map configuration

1.4.3   Syntax Description

exp-value

An integer from 0 (lowest priority) to 7 (highest priority) representing the contents of the three EXP bits in the MPLS label header.

all

Maps all valid values for the source value to the specified target value. Any existing configuration for the classification map is overridden.

pd-value

An integer from 0 to 63 (6 bits), with the packet priority encoded in 3 higher-order bits and the packet drop precedence in the 3 lower-order bits. You can enter the value in decimal or hexadecimal format, for example 16 or 0x10. You can also enter a standard Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) marking label.


The scale used by this command for packet priority, from 0 (lowest priority) to 7 (highest priority), is the relative inverse of the scale used by the mark priority command. For details on this command, see Configuring Rate-Limiting and Class-Limiting.

1.4.4   Default

None

1.4.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mpls to qos command to define ingress mappings from MPLS EXP values to PD QoS values.

If you specify the all keyword, all valid MPLS EXP values are mapped to the specified PD value. Any existing configuration for the classification map is overridden. You can use the all keyword to specify a single default value for all the mapping entries, then override that value for a subset of entries by entering subsequent mapping commands without this keyword.

Use the default form of this command to revert map entries to either the default 8P0D or mapping schema values, if a mapping schema has been specified.

1.4.6   Examples

The following example defines the classification map exp-to-pd to determine initial MPLS values on ingress, defines the default mapping schema using 7P1D values, then maps MPLS EXP value 1 to the PD value 0x24:

[local]Redback(config)#qos class-map exp-to-pd mpls in

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#mapping-schema 7P1D

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#mpls 1 to qos 0x24

1.5   mpls traffic-engineering

mpls traffic-engineering

1.5.1   Purpose

Enables Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) advertisement of traffic engineering metrics.

1.5.2   Command Mode

OSPF router configuration

1.5.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.5.4   Default

The use of Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering is disabled.

1.5.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mpls traffic engineering command to cause OSPF to advertise traffic engineering metrics for OSPF interfaces.

1.5.6   Examples

The following example enables the use of MPLS traffic engineering:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ospf

[local]Redback(config-ospf)#mpls traffic-engineering

1.6   mpls use-ethernet

mpls {exp-value | all} use-ethernet [class-map-name]

{no | default} mpls {exp-value | all}

1.6.1   Purpose

Determines initial packet descriptor (PD) values by mapping Ethernet 802.1p values rather than directly mapping from Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) values for received MPLS packets with the specified EXP value.

1.6.2   Command Mode

class map configuration

1.6.3   Syntax Description

exp-value

An integer from 0 (lowest priority) to 7 (highest priority) representing the contents of the three EXP bits in the MPLS label header.

all

Maps all valid values for the source value to the specified target value. Any existing configuration for the classification map is overridden.

use-ethernet

Enables a secondary mapping lookup using the packet’s 802.1p bits as input. If no classification map is specified for the secondary lookup, the default 8P0D 802.1p-to-PD mapping is used.

class-map-name

Optional. Name of the secondary classification map.

1.6.4   Default

Ingress MPLS classification map entries use the 8P0D EXP-to-PD mapping, where the EXP value is copied to the PD priority field. The PD drop-precedence field is set to zero.

1.6.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mpls use-ethernet command to determine initial PD values by mapping Ethernet 802.1p values rather than directly mapping from MPLS EXP values for received MPLS packets with the specified EXP value. If a received packet with the specified EXP value does not include an Ethernet header, the SmartEdge router uses the default mapping instead of the specified mapping.

If you specify the all keyword, all valid MPLS EXP values are configured to use the 802.1p-to-PD mapping. Any existing configuration for the classification map is overridden. You can use the all keyword to specify a single default value for all the mapping entries, then override that value for a subset of entries by entering subsequent mapping commands without this keyword.

If you specify the optional class-map-name construct, the resulting mapping uses the specified 802.1p-to-PD classification map. The secondary classification map must have a value of Ethernet for the marking-type argument and a value of in for the mapping direction. If you do not specify a secondary classification map, the default mapping is used.

Use the no or default form of this command to revert one or all map entries to either the default 8P0D or mapping schema values, if a mapping schema has been specified.

1.7   mpls use-ip

mpls {exp-value | all} use-ip [class-map-name]

default mpls {exp-value | all}

1.7.1   Purpose

Determines packet descriptor (PD) values by mapping Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) values rather than Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) values on ingress for IP packets.

1.7.2   Command Mode

class map configuration

1.7.3   Syntax Description

exp-value

An integer from 0 (lowest priority) to 7 (highest priority) representing the contents of the three EXP bits in the MPLS label header.

all

Maps all valid values for the source value to the specified target value. Any existing configuration for the classification map is overridden.

class-map-name

Optional. Name of the secondary classification map.

1.7.4   Default

None

1.7.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mpls use-ip command to determine PD values by mapping DSCP values rather than MPLS EXP values on ingress for IP packets.

If you specify the all keyword, all valid EXP values are configured to use the DSCP-to-PD mapping. Any existing configuration for the classification map is overridden. You can use the all keyword to specify a single default value for all the mapping entries, then override that value for a subset of entries by entering subsequent mapping commands without this keyword.

If you specify the optional class-map-name argument, the resulting mapping uses the specified DSCP-to-PD classification map. The secondary classification map must have a value of ip for the marking-type argument, and a value of in for the mapping direction. If you do not specify a secondary classification map, the default mapping is used.

Use the default form of this command to revert values for one or all map entries to either the default 8P0D or mapping schema values, if a mapping schema has been specified.

1.7.6   Examples

The following example defines the classification map dscp-to-pd to determine initial quality of service (QoS) PD values on ingress, and specifies 7P1D encoding as a default mapping schema. It then overrides the default 7P1D values for EXP value 1 with PD value 0x24, and specifies the IP header DSCP value to determine the initial QoS PD value for packets received with EXP value 3. The secondary classification map exp-to-dscp is used for translation:

[local]Redback(config)#qos class-map dscp-to-pd mpls in

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#mapping-schema 7P1D

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#mpls 1 to qos 0x24

[local]Redback(config-class-map)#mpls 3 use-ip exp-to-dscp

1.8   mp mrru

mp mrru value

{no | default} mp mrru

1.8.1   Purpose

Sets the size of the maximum received reconstructed unit (MRRU) to be used to negotiate a Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (MP) bundle.

1.8.2   Command Mode

link group configuration

1.8.3   Syntax Description

value

Optional. The MRRU size for the MP bundle. The range of values is 256 to 128000.

1.8.4   Default

If no MRRU is specified, 1524 is the maximum size that can be negotiated.

1.8.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mp mrru command to set the MRRU to be used to negotiate an MP bundle. The SmartEdge router uses this value when calculating the maximum receive unit (MRU) or MRRU value to send in the Link Control Protocol (LCP) Configure Request to the peer.

MRRU configuration is supported on channelized E1 cards, channelized OC-3 and OC-12 cards, and clear-channel E3 cards. MRRU configuration is supported for static MP links only; it is not supported for subscriber links.

Use the no or default form of this command to return the MRRU to the default value.

1.8.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the endpoint discriminator as the IP address of the interface to which the MP bundle is bound:

[local]Redback(config)#link-group lg-multi mp
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#mp mrru 4470
[local]Redback(config-link-group)#exit

1.9   mrinfo

mrinfo target-mrouter-addr

1.9.1   Purpose

Queries a neighboring multicast router to determine which routers are peers of the local router.

1.9.2   Command Mode

exec

1.9.3   Syntax Description

target-mrouter-addr

IP address of the target neighboring multicast router.

1.9.4   Default

None

1.9.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mrinfo command to query a neighboring multicast router to determine which routers are peers of the local router. This command sends a query to a target multicast router and displays the response containing information about the target’s neighboring routers.

1.9.6   Examples

The following example queries a target multicast router, 10.3.1.3, and displays information about the target’s neighboring routers:

[local]Redback>mrinfo 10.3.1.3
10.3.1.3 (10.3.1.3) [version 21.3,mtrace]:

  10.4.1.3 -> 10.4.1.2 (10.4.1.2) [1/0/pim/querier]

  10.5.1.3 -> 10.5.1.4 (10.5.1.4) [1/0/pim]

1.10   mrouter

mrouter [static]

no mrouter

1.10.1   Purpose

Enables multicast router monitoring for circuits attached to the specified IGMP snooping profile.

1.10.2   Command Mode

IGMP snooping profile configuration

1.10.3   Syntax Description

static

Configures all circuits attached to the specified IGMP snooping profile to be static multicast router circuits.

1.10.4   Default

IGMP router monitoring is enabled on every circuit.

1.10.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mrouter command to enable multicast router monitoring for all circuits attached to a specified IGMP snooping profile. All circuits attached to the IGMP snooping profile assume the multicast routing setting specified in the profile.

Use the no form of this command to disable the multicast router monitoring for all circuits attached to the specified IGMP snooping profile.

If you do not include the optional static keyword with the mrouter command, IGMP packets are monitored on the circuits. If IGMP queries are received by an associated circuit, that circuit is declared to be a multicast routing circuit.

By default, every circuit is enabled for monitoring of IGMP packets. This behavior can be overwritten by configuring a bridge profile with the mrouter setting disabled or set to static.

1.10.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable IGMP router monitoring on every circuit attached to an IGMP snooping profile called p1:

[local]router#configure

[local]router(config)#igmp snooping profile p1

[local]router(config-igmp-snooping-profile)#mrouter

The following example shows how to configure all circuits attached to an IGMP snooping profile called sanjose1 to be static multicast router circuits:

[local]router#configure

[local]router(config)#igmp snooping profile sanjose1

[local]router(config-igmp-snooping-profile)#mrouter static

The following example shows how to disable multicast router discovery on all circuits attached to an IGMP snooping profile called milpitas1:

[local]router#configure

[local]router(config)#igmp snooping profile milpitas1

[local]router(config-igmp-snooping-profile)#no mrouter

1.11   mtrace

mtrace {src-addr | src-name} [gateway {gateway-addr | gateway-name}] [group {group-addr | group-name}] [hops hop-count] [interval trace-interval] [local_addr if-addr] [loop] [multicast] [no-router-alert] [numerical] [query query-count] [receiver {rec-addr | rec-name}] [response {host-addr | hostname}] [short_form] [ttl ttl] [unicast] [verbose] [wait wait-interval]

1.11.1   Purpose

Traces the path from a source to a destination branch on a multicast distribution tree.

1.11.2   Command Mode

exec

1.11.3   Syntax Description

src-addr

IP address of the source to end the process of tracing the path.

src-name

Name of the source to end the process of tracing the path.

gateway

Optional. Specifies the last hop router of the multicast receiver.

gateway-addr

IP address of the last hop router of the multicast receiver.

gateway-name

Name of the last hop router of the multicast receiver.

group

Optional. Specifies the group for which the path tracing is performed.

group-addr

IP address of the group for which the path tracing performed.

group-name

Name of the group for which the path tracing is performed.

hops hop-count

Optional. Maximum number of hops that can be traced.

interval trace-interval

Optional. Interval, in seconds, between statistics gathering traces.

local_addr if-addr

Optional. IP address of the local interface used for sourcing the query.

loop

Optional. Loops indefinitely printing statistics.

multicast

Optional. Specifies that responses are always requested using multicast routing.

no-router-alert

Optional. Sends request without router alert IP option.

numerical

Optional. Specifies that hop addresses be printed in dotted decimal format only.

query query-count

Optional. Maximum number of query attempts.

receiver

Optional. Specifies a receiver to begin the process of tracing the path.

rec-addr

IP address of receiver to begin the process of tracing the path.

rec-name

Name of receiver to begin the process of tracing the path.

response

Optional. Specifies a host to receive the path tracing responses.

host-addr

IP address of the host to receive the path tracing responses.

hostname

Name of host to receive the path tracing responses.

short_form

Optional. Enables short form output, and no statistics are displayed.

ttl ttl

Optional. Time-to-live (TTL) value for multicast trace queries and responses. The range of values is 1 to 255; the default value is 5.

unicast

Optional. Specifies that responses are always requested using unicast routing.

verbose

Optional. Enables verbose mode.

wait wait-interval

Optional. Interval, in seconds, to wait for a trace response.

1.11.4   Default

None

1.11.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mtrace command to trace the path from a source to a destination branch on a multicast distribution tree. The trace query is passed hop by hop along the direction from the receiver to the source, collecting each hop’s IP address, packet counts, and routing error codes. At the end of this path, a response to returned to the response IP address.

If the command is issued without specifying any trace query parameters, it interactively prompts for the parameters.

1.11.6   Examples

The following example displays the short form results of tracing a path from the source IP address, 11.1.1.21, to the multicast receiver’s last hop router IP address, 10.4.1.2, using the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) group with the IP address, 224.121.121.1:

[local]Redback>mtrace 11.1.1.21 group 224.121.121.1 gateway 10.4.1.2 short_form
Mtrace from 11.1.1.21 to 10.4.1.2 via group 224.121.121.1
Querying full reverse path... * switching to hop-by-hop:
  0  ? (10.4.1.2)
 -1  ? (10.4.1.2)  PIM  threshold 0  Reached RP/Core
 -2  * * ? (10.2.1.1)  PIM  threshold 0  
 -3  ? (11.1.1.21)
Round trip time 15 ms; total ttl of 1 required.

The following example displays detailed results of tracing a path from the source IP address, 11.1.1.21, to the multicast receiver’s last hop router IP address, 10.4.1.2, using the IGMP group with the IP address, 224.121.121.1:

[local]Redback>mtrace 11.1.1.21 group 224.121.121.1 gateway 10.4.1.2
Mtrace from 11.1.1.21 to 10.4.1.2 via group 224.121.121.1
Querying full reverse path... * switching to hop-by-hop:
  0  ? (10.4.1.2)
 -1  ? (10.4.1.2)  PIM  threshold 0  Reached RP/Core
 -2  * * ? (10.2.1.1)  PIM  threshold 0  
 -3  ? (11.1.1.21)
Round trip time 17 ms; total ttl of 1 required.

Waiting to accumulate statistics...Results after 10 seconds:

 Source        Response Dest     Overall       Packet Statistics For     
Traffic From
11.1.1.21       10.3.1.3         Packet      11.1.1.21 To 224.121.121.1
     v       __/  rtt   17 ms     Rate       Lost/Sent = Pct  Rate
0.0.0.0         (null)         
     v     ^      ttl    2     ^   0 pps        0/0    = --    0 pps
11.1.1.1       
10.2.1.1        ?              
     v     ^      ttl    2                      0/0    = --    0 pps
10.2.1.2       
10.4.1.2        ?              Reached RP/Core
     v      \__   ttl    3                      ?/0            0 pps?
10.4.1.2        10.3.1.3
  Receiver      Query Source

1.12   mtu (ATM, Ethernet, POS)

mtu size

default mtu

1.12.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size of the payload without fragmentation for an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) OC port, an ATM DS-3 port, an Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet port, or a Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) port.

1.12.2   Command Mode

1.12.3   Syntax Description

size

MTU payload size in bytes. The range of values and the default depend on the type of port; see Table 1.

1.12.4   Default

The default MTU payload size is dependent on the type of port; see Table 1.

1.12.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mtu command to specify the MTU size of the payload without fragmentation for an ATM, Ethernet, or Gigabit Ethernet, or POS port.

Table 1 lists the range of values and default for each type of port.

Table 1    Values for MTU Payload size Argument

Port Type

Range of Values (Bytes)

Default (Bytes)

ATM OC or DS-3

256 to 12,800

4470

Ethernet

  • 256 to 2000—Ports on any Ethernet traffic card(1)

  • 256 to 9600—Ports on an FE-GE traffic card(2)

1500

Gigabit Ethernet

256 to 9198

1500

POS

256 to 12800

4470

(1)  FE ports on an FE-GE traffic card support guaranteed lossless flow control for MTUs up to 2000 bytes.

(2)  FE ports on an FE-GE traffic card support guaranteed lossless flow control for MTUs up to 9600 bytes if the ports are explicitly configured for lossless flow control.


Note:  
The MTU size for an ATM port is the size of the IP packet to be segmented into ATM cells.

The Layer 2 headers are automatically added to the payload size and do not cause fragmentation; you do not include them when selecting the value of the size argument. You can also specify the MTU size at the interface level; the MTU size used is the minimum of the two values.

Note:  
If you have specified an MTU for all FE ports on an FE-GE traffic card (by using this command in card configuration mode), entering this command in port configuration mode overrides that MTU for this port only.

Note:  
If you change the MTU value for a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)-encapsulated channel or port that you have already configured and enabled with the no form of the shutdown command in the appropriate configuration mode, the change does not take effect until you shut down the channel or port, and then reenable it.

Note:  
This command is also described in Configuring Channels and Clear-Channel and Channelized Ports for a clear-channel DS-3 or E1 channel or port, E3 port, DS-1 channel, or DS-0 channel group.

Use the default form of this command to specify the default MTU payload size.

1.12.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify a MTU payload size of 1000 bytes for Ethernet port 1 in slot 4:

[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 4/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#mtu 1000

In this example, the Layer 2 headers for an Ethernet port include an 18-byte Ethernet header, a 4-byte 802.1Q header, and up to four 4-byte multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) labels, for a total of 38 bytes. Thus, in this example, the actual maximum packet size without fragmentation is 1038 bytes.

1.13   mtu (card)

mtu size

{no | default} mtu

1.13.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size of the payload without fragmentation for all Fast Ethernet (FE) ports on the Fast Ethernet-Gigabit Ethernet (FE-GE) traffic card.

1.13.2   Command Mode

card configuration

1.13.3   Syntax Description

size

MTU payload size in bytes. The range of values is 256 to 9600 bytes. The default value is 1500 bytes.

1.13.4   Default

The default MTU payload size is 1,500 bytes.

1.13.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mtu command to specify the MTU size of the payload without fragmentation for an all FE ports on the FE-GE traffic card.

The Layer 2 headers are automatically added to the payload size and do not cause fragmentation; you do not include them when selecting the value of the size argument.

Note:  
You can also specify the MTU size at the interface level; the MTU size used is the minimum of the two values.

Configuring ATM, Ethernet, and POS Ports also describes this command for all types of Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet ports.

You can override the MTU setting for individual FE ports by using this command in port configuration mode.

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default MTU payload size.

1.13.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify an MTU payload size of 9600 bytes for the FE ports on the FE-GE traffic card in slot 4:

[local]Redback(config)#card fege-60-2-port 4
[local]Redback(config-card)#mtu 9600

1.14   mtu (channel)

mtu size

default fault mtu

1.14.1   Purpose

Specifies the maximum transmission unit (MTU) payload size of the packet without fragmentation for a clear-channel DS-3 channel or port, clear-channel E3 port, E1 channel or port, DS-1 channel on a channelized DS-3 channel or port, or DS-0 channel group on a channelized E1 channel or port.

1.14.2   Command Mode

1.14.3   Syntax Description

size

MTU payload size of the packet in bytes. The range of values is 256 to 12,800. The default depends on the type of channel or port; see Table 2.

1.14.4   Default

The default MTU payload size depends on the type of channel or port; for more information see Table 2.

1.14.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mtu command to specify the MTU payload size of the packet without fragmentation for a clear-channel DS-3 channel or port, E3 port, E1 channel or port, a DS-1 channel on a channelized DS-3 channel or port, or a DS-0 channel group on a channelized E1 channel or port.

Table 2 lists the range of values and default for each type of channel or port.

Table 2    Values for the MTU Payload size Argument

Channel or Port Type

Range of Values (Bytes)

Default (Bytes)

Clear-channel DS-3

256 to 12,800

4,470

Clear-channel E3

256 to 9,192

4,470

E1

256 to 12,800

1,500

DS-1

256 to 12,800

1,500

DS-0 channel group

256 to 12,800

1,500

The Layer 2 headers are automatically added to the payload size and do not cause fragmentation; you do not include them when selecting the value of the size argument.

Note:  
You can also specify the MTU size at the interface level; the MTU size used is the minimum of the two values.

Note:  
If you change the MTU value for a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)-encapsulated channel or port that you have already configured and enabled with the no form of the shutdown command in the appropriate configuration mode, the change does not take effect until you shut down the channel or port and then reenable it.

This command is also described in Configuring ATM, Ethernet, and POS Ports for Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) OC, ATM DS-3, Ethernet, and Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) ports.

Use the default form of this command to specify the default value of the MTU payload size of the packet.

1.14.6   Examples

The following example shows how to specify the MTU payload size of the packet to be 2000 on clear-channel DS-3 port 1:

[local]Redback(config)#port ds3 3/1
[local]Redback(config-ds3)#mtu 2000

1.15   mtu (tunnel)

mtu bytes

{no | default} mtu

1.15.1   Purpose

Sets the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size for packets sent in a tunnel.

1.15.2   Command Mode

tunnel configuration

1.15.3   Syntax Description

bytes

MTU size in bytes. The range of values is 256 to 16384.

1.15.4   Default

MTU for the interface to which the tunnel is bound.

1.15.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the mtu command to set the MTU for packets sent in a tunnel. If an IP packet exceeds the MTU, the system fragments that packet.

A tunnel uses the MTU size for the interface to which you have bound it with the bind interface command (in tunnel configuration mode), unless you explicitly configure the MTU using this command. After you configure an MTU for the tunnel, the system determines the effective MTU by comparing the configured MTU with the interface MTU and selecting the lesser of the two values.

Use the no or default form of this command to delete the configured MTU and use the interface MTU.

1.15.6   Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum IP packet size for the DenverTnl to 1024 bytes:

[local]Redback(config)#tunnel ipv6v4 DenverTnl
[local]Redback(config-tunnel)#mtu 1024

1.16   multicast adjust-qos-rate

multicast adjust-qos-rate {metering | queuing} [minimum-rate kbps] [parent]

no multicast adjust-qos-rate{metering | queuing} [minimum-rate] [parent]

1.16.1   Purpose

Sets the QoS adjustment rate on metering and queuing bindings.

1.16.2   Command Mode

IGMP service profile configuration

1.16.3   Syntax Description

metering

Applies the adjusted QoS rate on metering bindings.

queuing

Applies the adjusted QoS rate on queuing bindings.

minimum-ratekbps

Minimum rate, in kpbs, to be set aside for a given binding to avoid starving unicast traffic. The range is 64 to 9999999..

parent

Applies to the parent circuit binding..

1.16.4   Default

QoS rate adjustment is not applied to metering or queuing bindings.

1.16.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the multicast adjust-qos-rate command to adjust the QoS binding rate for metering or queuing bindings.

Within a given IGMP service profile, up to two instances of this command may be configured: one for metering and one for queuing. If the queuing keyword is used, the SmartEdge router adjusts the rate on the PWFQ Layer 2 node on the circuit on which the IGMP joins are received. If no Layer 2 node is found on that circuit, the SmartEdge router does not make any QoS adjustments and logs a message to this effect.

When making adjustments to metering, if both metering and shaping rates are in effect, the adjustments occur independently.

The minimum-rate option allows you to specify a minimum amount of bandwidth that cannot be eliminated by QoS adjustment. This option allows you to ensure that an incorrect IGMP state (for example, a missed leave message) does not starve delay-sensitive traffic (such as voice traffic) on the PPPoE session. If rate adjustment causes the enforced rate to reach this minimum rate, the SmartEdge router logs a message.

Use the no form of this command to disable QoS rate adjustment on metering or queuing bindings.

1.16.6   Examples

The following example sets the minimum rate for QoS adjustment to 1200 kpbs for metering bindings and 1000 kpbs for queuing bindings in the IGMP service profile profile1 in context ContextA:

[local]Redback(config)#context ContextA


[local]Redback(config-ctx)#igmp service-profile profile1

[local]Redback(config-igmp-service-profile)#multicast adjust-qos-rate metering 
minimum-rate 1200
[local]Redback(config-igmp-service-profile)#multicast adjust-qos-rate queuing 
minimum-rate 1000

1.17   multicast adjust-qos-rate delay-interval

multicast adjust-qos-rate delay-interval seconds

{no | default} multicast adjust-qos-rate delay-interval

1.17.1   Purpose

Sets a time interval after which QoS rate adjustment is to be applied.

1.17.2   Command Mode

IGMP service profile configuration

1.17.3   Syntax Description

seconds

The interval, in seconds, after which QoS rate adjustment is to be applied. The range is 1 to 10. The default is 5.

1.17.4   Default

QoS rate adjustment is applied after a five-second delay.

1.17.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the multicast adjust-qos-rate delay-interval command to specify the delay between the time a subscriber leaves and the time when QoS rate adjustment is applied to the subscriber circuit.

Suppressing rate adjustments after IGMP leaves helps control churn in cases of aggressive bandwidth changes.

Use the no or default form of this command to restore the default delay interval.

1.17.6   Examples

The following example sets the delay interval to 8 seconds in the IGMP service profile profile1 in context ContextA:

[local]Redback(config)#context ContextA


[local]Redback(config-ctx)#igmp service-profile profile1

[local]Redback(config-igmp-service-profile)#multicast adjust-qos-rate delay-interval 8

1.18   multicast destination

multicast destination [if-name ctx-name [group-list acl-name]]

no multicast destination

1.18.1   Purpose

Enables the forwarding of multicast data for Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) messages received on the Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) subscriber circuits on an out-of-band (separated from the PPPoE circuit) IP over Ethernet (IPoE) interface.

1.18.2   Command Mode

IGMP service profile configuration

1.18.3   Syntax Description

if-name

Optional. Multicast-enabled interface name.

ctx-name

Optional. Context name in which the multicast-enabled interface resides.

group-list acl-name

Optional. Name of the access control list (ACL) used to filter IGMP control messages.

1.18.4   Default

Forwarding multicast data on an out-of-band IPoE interface is disabled.

1.18.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the multicast destination command to enable the forwarding of multicast data for IGMP messages received on the PPPoE subscriber circuits on an out-of-band IPoE interface.

The IGMP service profile must be bound to a subscriber record through a configuration or a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) attribute.

Note:  
For the multicast destination command to work properly, the out-of-band IPoE interface on which the multicast data is to be forwarded must be multicast-enabled; use the multicast output command (in interface configuration mode) to enable the out-of-band IPoE interface to forward multicast data.

Use the no form of this command to disable the forwarding of multicast data for IGMP messages received on the PPPoE subscriber circuits on an out-of-band IPoE interface.

1.18.6   Examples

The following example enables the to_dslam5 interface on the local context to forward multicast data, and configures the foo IGMP service profile to enable the forwarding of multicast data received on a PPPoE subscriber circuit on the to_dslam5 interface:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface to_dslam5

[local]Redback(config-if)#multicast output

[local]Redback(config-if)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#igmp service-profile foo

[local]Redback(config-igmp-service-profile)#multicast destination to_dslam5

1.19   multicast output

multicast output [accept-unknown-mac]

{no | default} multicast output [accept-unknown-mac]

1.19.1   Purpose

Enables an interface to forward multicast data, and to send and receive Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) control messages.

1.19.2   Command Mode

interface configuration

1.19.3   Syntax Description

accept-unknown-mac

Optional. Accepts IGMP control packets with unknown medium access control (MAC) addresses.

1.19.4   Default

No interface is enabled for multicast data.

1.19.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the multicast output command to enable an interface to forward multicast data, and to send and receive IGMP control messages.

An IP over Ethernet (IPoE) circuit, on a Gigabit Ethernet port or an 802.1Q permanent virtual circuit (PVC) configured on it, must be configured on the interface to carry the multicast services. The MAC addresses received from IGMP control packets on the IPoE circuit are compared to the subscriber’s MAC address received on the corresponding Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) circuit. By default, if the MAC addresses do not match, the IGMP control packet is dropped. Use the accept-unknown-mac keyword to accept IGMP control packets that have MAC addresses that do not match the subscriber’s MAC address.

Note:  
The multicast output command only enables an interface for multicast services; the multicast destination command (in IGMP service profile configuration mode) must also be configured to enable the forwarding of multicast data for IGMP messages received on the PPPoE subscriber circuits on the multicast-enabled interface. A single multicast-enabled interface carry multicast data for multiple IGMP service profiles with configured multicast destinations.

Use the no form of this command to disable an interface from forwarding multicast data, and from sending and receiving IGMP control messages.

Use the default form of this command to disable the acceptance of IGMP control packets with unknown MAC addresses on an interface where the accept-unknown-mac keyword is configured.

1.19.6   Examples

The following example enables the to_dslam5 interface on the local context to forward multicast data, and configures the foo IGMP service profile to enable the forwarding of multicast data received on a PPPoE subscriber circuit on the to_dslam5 interface:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface to_dslam5

[local]Redback(config-if)#multicast output accept-unknown-mac

[local]Redback(config-if)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#igmp service-profile foo

[local]Redback(config-igmp-service-profile)#multicast destination to_dslam5

1.20   multicast rate-limit

multicast rate-limit kbps burst-size bytes

no multicast rate-limit

1.20.1   Purpose

Sets the rate and burst tolerance for multicast traffic on any port, circuit, or Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) pseudowire circuit to which you assign this bridge profile.

1.20.2   Command Mode

bridge profile configuration

1.20.3   Syntax Description

kbps

Rate in kilobits per second. The range of values is 5 to 1,000,000.

burst-size bytes

Burst tolerance in bytes. The range of values is 1 to 12,000,000.

1.20.4   Default

No rate limiting is imposed on multicast traffic on any port, circuit, or VPLS pseudowire circuit to which you assign this bridge profile.

1.20.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the multicast rate-limit command to set the rate and burst tolerance for multicast traffic on any port, circuit, or VPLS pseudowire circuit to which this profile is assigned. For more information about VPLS pseudowire circuits, see Configuring VPLS.

Use the no form of this command to remove any rate limiting for multicast traffic.

1.20.6   Examples

The following example shows how to create the prof-isp1 bridge profile and rate limits the multicast traffic to 6000000 kbps and the burst size to 10000 bytes:

[local]Redback(config)#bridge profile prof-isp1

[local]Redback(confg-bridge-profile)#multicast rate-limit 600000 burst-size 10000

1.21   multi-paths

multi-paths {external path-num [internal path-num] | internal path-num [external path-num] | eibgp path-num}

{no | default} multi-paths {external path-num [internal path-num] | internal path-num [external path-num] | eibgp}

1.21.1   Purpose

Configures the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routing process to install multiple best equal-cost paths in the routing table for load-balancing traffic to BGP destinations.

1.21.2   Command Mode

BGP router configuration

1.21.3   Syntax Description

external path-num

External BGP (eBGP) equal-cost paths. The path-num argument specifies the maximum number of equal-cost eBGP best paths a BGP route can have. The range of values is 1 to 8; the default value is 1.


internal path-num

Internal BGP (iBGP) equal-cost paths. The path-num argument specifies the maximum number of equal-cost iBGP best paths a BGP route can have. The range of values is 1 to 8; the default value is 1.


eibgp path-num

Configures multipath load balancing using both eBGP and iBGP paths in a BGP/Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Virtual Private Network (VPN).


This option is available only in a VPN context. If this option is configured, only 1 eBGP path is allowed, and the number of allowed iBGP equal cost paths is equal to the eibgp path-num minus 1. For example, if you configure eibgp 7, there are 6 iBGP paths and 1 eBGP path.


The range of values for path-num is 1 to 8; the default value is 0.


1.21.4   Default

BGP multipath capabilities are disabled.

1.21.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the multi-paths command to configure the BGP routing process to install multiple best equal-cost paths in the routing table for load-balancing traffic to BGP destinations. Equal-cost means that each path has the same weight, local preference, AS path length, origin type, IGP metric, and Multi-Exit Discriminator (MED) attributes if the MED values are learned from the same AS. If one of these attributes is different, the path is not considered to be an equal-cost path.

Use the external keyword to balance loads among equal-cost paths from different eBGP neighbors. Use the internal keyword to balance loads among equal-cost paths from different iBGP neighbors.

With the exception of eiBGP VPN contexts, BGP either installs all iBGP equal-cost best paths or all eBGP equal-cost best paths, depending on whether the best path that is advertised to the BGP peers is an eBGP path or an iBGP path. Paths learned from BGP confederation peers are considered as iBGP paths. Although multiple paths are installed, only one path (the best path available) is advertised at a time.

Note:  
When eiBGP is configured, the IGP metric is not considered in equal-cost path calculations.

Use the no or default form of this command to restore the default setting.

1.21.6   Examples

The following example load balances outgoing traffic packets between either 2 eBGP paths or 5 iBGP paths:

[local]Redback(config)#router bgp 64001

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#multi-paths external 2 internal 5

The following example configures multipath load balancing in a VPN context among 1 eBGP and up to 6 iBGP equal cost paths:

[local]Redback#config

[local]Redback(config)#context vpn1 vpn-rd

[local]Redback(config)#router bgp vpn

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#multi-paths eibgp 7

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#

1.22   multi-topology transition

multi-topology transition

no multi-topology transition

1.22.1   Purpose

For IP Version 6 (IPv6) Intermediate System-to-Intermediate-System (IS-IS) routing, places an IS-IS instance in multitopology transition mode.

1.22.2   Command Mode

IS-IS address family configuration

1.22.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.22.4   Default

Multitopology transition mode is disabled for an IS-IS instance.

1.22.5   Usage Guidelines

For IPv6 IS-IS routing, use the multi-topology transition command to place an IS-IS instance in multitopology transition mode.

Note:  
The SmartEdge router does not support single-topology IS-IS routing for IPv6.

Temporarily enter the multitopology transition mode if you want the SmartEdge router to route IPv6 traffic and you have existing IPv6 IS-IS routers in the area that are operating in single-topology mode. This transition mode enables routers in single-topology and multitopology modes to interoperate while you upgrade all routers to multitopology mode. If you do not enter multitopology transition mode, any routers in single-topology mode and those in multitopology mode lose IPv6 connectivity and the resulting IPv6 topology contains holes.

Routers in single-topology mode continue to operate in single-topology mode during the transition. However, they send two types of type-length-values (TLVs) in link-state packets (LSPs) for all configured IPv6 addresses: TLVs for single-topology mode and TLVs for multitopology mode. The topological restrictions of single-topology mode no longer apply when all routers in the area are in multitopology mode.

Use the show configuration isis command to see if a particular IS-IS instance is running in multitopology transition mode.

Use the no form of this command to remove the transition mode from the SmartEdge router configuration. Do so after you upgrade all routers in the area to support multitopology IPv6 IS-IS routing.

1.22.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enter multitopology transition mode:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis isis2

[local]Redback(config-isis)#address-family ipv6 unicast

[local]Redback(config-isis-af)#multi-topology transition

1.23   nak-on-subnet-deletion

nak-on-subnet-deletion

{no | nak-on-subnet-deletion

1.23.1   Purpose

Instead of dropping a request, when a subnet or range is deleted, responds with a DHCP NAK for lease renewal requests for IP addresses.

1.23.2   Command Mode

DHCP server configuration

1.23.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.23.4   Default

This functionality is disabled. Lease renewal requests for IP addresses on a deleted subnet or range are dropped.

1.23.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nak-on-subnet-deletion command to make the DHCP server to NAK lease renewal requests for IP addresses on a deleted subnet or range. This will trigger the DHCP clients to reinitiate the discovery process to get a new IP address. When this feature is disabled, renewal requests for IP addresses on a deleted subnet or range will be dropped by the DHCP server. In this case, the DHCP clients will continue to use their IP addresses until the lease expires. Use the no form of this command to delete nak-on-subnet-deletion from DHCP server configuration.

1.23.6   Examples

The following example enables this feature:

[local]Redback(config)#context dhcp

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#dhcp server policy

[local]Redback(config-dhcp-server)#nak-on-subnet-deletion

1.24   national

national

{no | default} national

1.24.1   Purpose

Enables or disables the national bit (bit 12 of set 1) in the E3 frame.

1.24.2   Command Mode

E3 configuration

1.24.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.24.4   Default

The national bit is disabled

1.24.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the national command to enable the national bit (bit 12 of set 1) in the E3 frame.

You enable the national bit if the digital path crosses a geographical border and only if the port is configured with G.751 framing (the default).

Use either the no or default form of this command to disable the national bit.

1.24.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the national bit for the E3 port 1 on the clear-channel E3 traffic card in slot 4:

[local]Redback(config)#port e3 4/1

[local]Redback(config-e3)#framing g751

[local]Redback(config-e3)#national

1.25   native-vlan-tag

native-vlan-tag value

no native-vlan-tag

1.25.1   Purpose

Configures a native virtual LAN (VLAN) tag for transporting untagged 802.1Q permanent virtual circuit (PVC) traffic across a pseudowire.

1.25.2   Command Mode

VPLS profile neighbor configuration

1.25.3   Syntax Description

value

Native VLAN tag value. The range of values is 1 to 4,095.

1.25.4   Default

The native VLAN tag is not configured.

1.25.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the native-vlan-tag command to configure a native VLAN tag for transporting untagged 802.1Q PVC traffic across a pseudowire.

The native VLAN tag value is configurable on the SmartEdge router to enable interoperability with the native VLAN tag used by other devices in the network.

When the native VLAN tag is configured for a pseudowire instance:

Note:  
Only one native VLAN tag per pseudowire is supported.

Use the no form of this command to remove the native VLAN tag configuration.

1.25.6   Examples

The following example configures a native VLAN tag with a tag value of 23:

[local]Redback#config

[local]Redback(config)#vpls profile foo

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile)#neighbor 10.10.10.1

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile-neighbor)#native-vlan-tag 23

1.26   nat policy

nat policy pol-name [radius-guided]

no nat policy pol-name

1.26.1   Purpose

Configures a Network Address Translation (NAT) policy name and enters NAT policy configuration mode.

1.26.2   Command Mode

context configuration

1.26.3   Syntax Description

pol-name

NAT policy name.

radius-guided

Optional. Specifies a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) guided policy and allows the policy to be modified by dynamic access control lists (ACLs).

1.26.4   Default

None

1.26.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nat policy command to configure a NAT policy name and enter NAT policy configuration mode.

Use the radius-guided keyword to specify a RADIUS-guided policy and to allow the policy to be modified by dynamic ACLs. You cannot remove a dynamic policy ACL from the policy after you have configured it, nor can you change the policy type from static to RADIUS-guided. To remove a dynamic policy ACL or change its type, delete the policy and then recreate it as a static policy.

Use the no form of this command to remove the NAT policy.

1.26.6   Examples

The following example translates source addresses for NAT policy, p2, which is applied to packets received on the pos2 interface:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#nat policy p2

[local]Redback(config-policy-nat)#ip static in source 34.34.34.34 35.35.35.35

[local]Redback(config-policy-nat)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface pos2

[local]Redback(config-if)#ip nat p2

1.27   nat policy-name

nat policy-name pol-name

no nat policy-name pol-name

1.27.1   Purpose

Attaches the specified Network Address Translation (NAT) policy name to the subscriber’s circuit.

1.27.2   Command Mode

subscriber configuration

1.27.3   Syntax Description

pol-name

NAT policy name.

1.27.4   Default

None

1.27.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nat policy-name command to attach the specified NAT policy to the subscriber’s circuit.

Use the no form of this command to remove the NAT policy from the subscriber’s circuit.

1.27.6   Examples

The following example attaches the NAT policy, nat-pol-1, to the circuit attached to the nat-sub subscriber’s circuit:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#subscriber name nat-sub

[local]Redback(config-sub)#nat policy-name nat-pol-1

1.28   nbns

nbns {primary | secondary} ip-addr

no nbns {primary | secondary} ip-addr

1.28.1   Purpose

Specifies the IP address of the primary or secondary NetBIOS Name Server (NBNS) in the subscriber record or profile.

1.28.2   Command Mode

subscriber configuration

1.28.3   Syntax Description

primary

Specifies that the IP address is for the primary NBNS.

secondary

Specifies that the IP address is for the secondary NBNS.

ip-addr

IP address of the primary or secondary NBNS.

1.28.4   Default

NBNS information is not provided to the subscriber.

1.28.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nbns command to specify the IP address of the primary or secondary NBNS in the subscriber record or profile.

Note:  
This command does not instruct the SmartEdge router to use the specified name servers in any way for its own purposes. Rather, this information is passed to the subscriber using the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) negotiation. The subscriber uses NBNS to obtain IP addresses from NetBIOS names. These values are utilized using PPP when the remote peer requests this information (see RFC 1877, PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol Extensions for Name Server Addresses). The SmartEdge router does not push this information to the remote peer.

Use the no form of this command to remove the IP address of the primary or secondary NBNS from the subscriber profile or record.

Note:  
The comparable commands to specify the IP addresses for a Domain Name System (DNS) server are described in Configuring DNS.

1.28.6   Examples

The following example specifies the primary address of the NBNS in the record for subscriber SamQ:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#subscriber name SamQ

[local]Redback(config-sub)#nbns primary 10.1.1.20 

1.29   nd profile

nd profile profile-name

{no} nd profile profile-name

1.29.1   Purpose

Configures an Neighbor Discovery (ND) profile and enters ND profile configuration mode.

1.29.2   Command Mode

Context configuration

1.29.3   Syntax Description

profile-name

ND profile name. Specify up to 39 ASCII characters.

1.29.4   Default

If an ND profile is not assigned to an IPV6 subscriber circuit, ND assigns a default ND profile (GLOBAL DEFAULT PROFILE) to the circuit. This profile consists of default values for each ND parameter.

Note:  
The default ND profile is included in the output display of the show nd profile command.

1.29.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nd profile command to configure an ND profile or select an existing one for modification, and enter ND profile configuration mode. In ND profile configuration mode, you can configure the ND parameters to apply to the profile. After you create the profile, you can assign it to an IPV6 subscriber by specifying the profile name under the appropriate subscriber record using the ipv6 nd profile command. For more information about this configuration, see Configuring ND.

Use the no form of this command to delete an ND profile.

Note:  
If a profile is deleted, the subscribers using that profile are automatically reassigned to the default ND profile.

1.29.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure an ND profile ndprofile7:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#nd profile ndprofile7

1.30   neighbor

neighbor ipv6-addr mac-addr

no neighbor ipv6-addr mac-addr

1.30.1   Purpose

Specifies a static neighbor for this Neighbor Discovery (ND) router interface.

1.30.2   Command Mode

ND router interface configuration

1.30.3   Syntax Description

ipv6-addr

IPv6 address for this neighbor in the format A:B:C:D:E:F:G:H.

mac-addr

Medium access control (MAC) address for this neighbor.

1.30.4   Default

No static neighbors are specified for any interface.

1.30.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor command to specify a static neighbor for this ND router interface. Enter this command multiple times to configure more than one neighbor.

Use the no form of this command to delete the neighbor from the configuration for this ND router interface.

1.30.6   Examples

The following example specifies a neighbor with IPv6 address, 2006::1/112, and MAC address, 00:30:88:00:0a:30, for the int1 ND router interface:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router nd

[local]Redback(config-nd)#interface int1

[local]Redback(config-nd-if)#neighbor 2006::1/112 00:30:88:00:0a:30

1.31   neighbor (BFD)

neighbor ip-addr

no neighbor ip-addr

1.31.1   Purpose

Creates a new Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) neighbor, or selects an existing one for modification, and enters BFD neighbor configuration mode.

1.31.2   Command Mode

BFD router configuration

1.31.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

BFD neighbor IP address, in the form A.B.C.D.

1.31.4   Default

No BFD neighbors are configured.

1.31.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor command to create a new BFD neighbor, or select an existing one for modification, and enter BFD neighbor configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to delete a BFD neighbor configuration.

1.31.6   Examples

The following example creates a new BFD neighbor, 10.10.10.1:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bfd

[local]Redback(config-bfd)#neighbor 10.10.10.1

[local]Redback(config-bfd-nbr)#

1.32   neighbor (BGP)

neighbor {ip-addr | ipv6-addr} {external | internal}

no neighbor ip-addr {external | internal}

1.32.1   Purpose

Configures a Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) neighbor and enters BGP neighbor configuration mode.

1.32.2   Command Mode

BGP router configuration

1.32.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

BGP neighbor IP address in the form A.B.C.D.

ipv6-addr

BGP neighbor IP Version 6 (IPv6) address in the form A:B:C:D:E:F:G.

external

Identifies the peer as an external BGP (eBGP) neighbor.

internal

Identifies the peer as an internal BGP (iBGP) neighbor.

1.32.4   Default

There are no preconfigured neighbors.

1.32.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor command to configure a BGP neighbor and enter BGP neighbor configuration mode. If you enter the external keyword, you must also enable the remote-as command in BGP neighbor configuration mode. If you enter the internal keyword, the remote-as command is not needed.

When the neighbor command is issued, the address family for that neighbor defaults to unicast. For an IP Version 4 (IPv4) address family, you can modify this setting through the address-family ipv4 command in BGP neighbor configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to remove a configured BGP neighbor.

1.32.6   Examples

The following example configures an eBGP neighbor at IP address, 102.210.210.1, and enters BGP neighbor configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 102.210.210.1 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#

The following example configures an iBGP neighbor at IPv6 address, 28FF:AA12:0DB8:85A3::2000, and enters BGP neighbor configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 28FF:AA12:0DB8:85A3::2000 internal

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#

1.33   neighbor (OSPF)

neighbor{ip-addr | ipv6-addr} [cost cost] [poll-interval interval] [router-priority priority]

no neighbor {ip-addr | ipv6-addr} [cost cost] [poll-interval interval] [router-priority priority]

1.33.1   Purpose

Configures an Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) or OSPF Version 3 (OSPFv3) neighbor.

1.33.2   Command Mode

1.33.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

OSPF neighbor IP address in the form A.B.C.D.

ipv6-addr

OSPFv3 neighbor IP Version 6 (IPv6) address in the form A:B:C:D:E:F:G.

cost cost

Optional. Cost to reach the neighbor. This cost overrides the interface cost set through the cost command (in OSPF or OSPF3 interface configuration mode). The range of values is 1 to 65,535; the default value is 1.

poll-interval interval

Optional. Interval, in seconds, at which the neighbor is polled when it is unreachable or down. The range of values is 1 to 65,535; the default value is 120.

router-priority priority

Optional. Priority setting for the neighbor. The range of values is 0 to 255; the default value is 1.

1.33.4   Default

If a cost value is not specified, the value set through the cost command is used; otherwise, the cost is 1. The poll interval is 120 seconds; the router priority is 1.

1.33.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor command to configure an OSPF or OSPFv3 neighbor.

You can only use the router-priority priority construct for nonbroadcast multiaccess (NBMA) networks when designated and backup routers are elected.

Use the no form of this command to remove a neighbor configuration.

1.33.6   Examples

The following example sets a cost of 10 for the neighbor at IP address 193.12.3.2:

[local]Redback(config-ospf-if)#neighbor 193.12.3.2 cost 10 

1.34   neighbor password

neighbor ip-addr password password

no neighbor ip-addr password

1.34.1   Purpose

Assigns an encrypted Message Digest 5 (MD5) password to a Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) neighbor.

1.34.2   Command Mode

LDP router configuration

1.34.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

Neighbor IP address in the form A.B.C.D.

password

Alphanumeric string consisting of up to 80 characters.

1.34.4   Default

MD5 password is disabled.

1.34.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor password command to assign an encrypted MD5 password to an LDP neighbor.

Note:  
For an LDP session to be established, the MD5 password must be the same on both the router and its neighbor.

Use the no form of this command to remove the password from an LDP neighbor.

1.34.6   Examples

The following example assigns the password, secret, to LDP neighbor, 10.1.1.1:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ldp

[local]Redback(config-ldp)#neighbor 10.1.1.1 password secret

1.35   neighbor profile

neighbor profile prof-name

no neighbor profile prof-name

1.35.1   Purpose

Creates an empty Access Node Control Protocol (ANCP) profile for an ANCP neighbor peer, and accesses ANCP neighbor configuration mode.

1.35.2   Command Mode

ANCP configuration

1.35.3   Syntax Description

prof-name

ANCP neighbor profile name.

1.35.4   Default

No ANCP neighbor profile exists.

1.35.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor profile command to create an ANCP neighbor profile and access ANCP neighbor configuration mode.

The SmartEdge router listens for incoming ANCP sessions, using the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) local port that you have configured with the tcp-port local command (in ANCP configuration mode). When an ANCP session is received, its attributes must match the attributes you have configured for one of the ANCP neighbor profiles. This means that the session must match each attribute that you have configured for the profile. If an attribute is not configured, then any value for that attribute is accepted. For example, if the remote TCP port is not configured, then the incoming session can have any source port number, as long as the other items match. An empty neighbor profile with no attributes configured allows all incoming connections.

Use the no form of this command to delete this ANCP neighbor profile.

1.35.6   Examples

The following example creates the ancp-profile ANCP neighbor profile and accesses ANCP neighbor configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config-ancp)#neighbor profile ancp-profile

[local]Redback(config-ancp-neighbor)#

1.36   neighbor targeted

neighbor ip-addr targeted

no neighbor ip-addr targeted

1.36.1   Purpose

Configures a remote Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) neighbor and enables extended LDP discovery of the specified neighbor.

1.36.2   Command Mode

LDP router configuration

1.36.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

IP address of the remote LDP neighbor in the form A.B.C.D.

1.36.4   Default

Extended LDP discovery is disabled.

1.36.5   Usage Guidelines

There are two types of LDP neighbor discovery mechanisms: basic LDP discovery and extended LDP discovery. Basic LDP discovery is used to discover immediate neighbors; extended LDP discovery is used to discover neighbors that can be multiple hops away.

There are two types of LDP Hello messages: link Hello messages and targeted Hello messages. Link Hello messages are multicast on an interface to immediate neighbors. Link Hello messages are used in basic LDP discovery. Targeted Hello messages are unicast directly to remote neighbors, and are used in extended LDP discovery. Two LDP speaking label-switched routers (LSRs) can form LDP adjacencies after discovering each other. LDP adjacencies discovered by link Hello messages are link Hello adjacencies. LDP adjacencies discovered by targeted Hello messages are targeted Hello adjacencies.

Use the neighbor targeted command to configure a remote LDP neighbor and enable extended LDP discovery of the specified neighbor. Targeted Hello messages can be transmitted or accepted to or from the specified neighbor.

Use the no form of this command to remove a configured remote LDP neighbor, and to disable extended LDP discovery of the specified neighbor.

1.36.6   Examples

The following example configures a remote neighbor of address 10.1.1.1:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ldp

[local]Redback(config-ldp)#neighbor 10.1.1.1 targeted

1.37   neighbor (VPLS)

neighbor ip-addr

{no | default} neighbor ip-addr

1.37.1   Purpose

Creates a new neighbor, or selects an existing one for modification, and enters Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) profile neighbor configuration mode.

1.37.2   Command Mode

VPLS profile configuration

1.37.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

Neighbor IP address, in the form A.B.C.D.

1.37.4   Default

None

1.37.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the neighbor command to create a new neighbor, or select an existing one for modification, and enter VPLS profile neighbor configuration mode.

The neighbor is identified by the IP address of the remote provider edge (PE) device. It is used along with the pseudowire ID from the VPLS instance configuration to establish a pseudowire between the local and remote PE devices. Multiple peering sessions (created by VPLS profiles) can be established to the same PE device; different profiles can reference the same remote PE IP address.

Use the no or default form of this command to remove a configured neighbor.

1.37.6   Examples

The following example creates a new VPLS neighbor with the IP address, 10.10.10.1:

[local]Redback#config

[local]Redback(config)#vpls profile foo

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile)#neighbor 10.10.10.1

[local]Redback(config-vpls-profile-neighbor)#

1.38   net

netnet

no netnet

1.38.1   Purpose

Configures a network entity title (NET) for the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) routing process.

1.38.2   Command Mode

IS-IS router configuration

1.38.3   Syntax Description

net

Area address and system ID for the IS-IS routing process. This argument can be either an address in hexadecimal-dotted byte format or a name.

1.38.4   Default

A NET is mandatory for IS-IS operation. If this option is not configured, the IS-IS instance is disabled.

1.38.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the net command to configure a NET for the IS-IS routing process.

Network entity titles can be anywhere between 8 and 20 bytes in length, and are provided in a hexadecimal-dotted byte format, such as 47.0005.80ff.e200.02aa.0a00.0002.00. The last byte, which is the Network Service Access Point (NSAP) n-selector, must be zero. The 6 bytes before the last byte indicate the system ID. This ID must be the same for all NETs configured for the system, and must be unique within the IS-IS domain. The bytes before that indicate an area ID, which is a variable from 1 to 13 bytes. Multiple areas can be specified in scenarios of area merges and the necessity of renumbering. The protocol will not form a level 1 adjacency between two devices if they have no areas in common.

Use the no form of this command to remove a NET.

1.38.6   Examples

The following example assigns a NET of 47.0001.0002.0002.0002.00 to the ip-backbone IS-IS instance:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#net 47.0001.0002.0002.0002.00

1.39   netop

netop

no netop

1.39.1   Purpose

Enables the NetOp daemon, which allows the SmartEdge router to communicate with the NetOp Element Management System (EMS) server, and enters NetOp configuration mode.

1.39.2   Command Mode

global configuration

1.39.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.39.4   Default

The NetOp daemon is disabled.

1.39.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the netop command to enable the NetOp daemon, which allows the SmartEdge router to communicate with the NetOp EMS server, and enter NetOp configuration mode.

Use the no form of this command to disable communication with the NetOp EMS server.

Note:  
You must configure the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) community before you specify the version of the SNMP traps that the NetOp EMS server receives.

1.39.6   Examples

The following example enables the SmartEdge router to communicate with the NetOp EMS server and enters NetOp configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config)#netop

[local]Redback(config-netop)#

1.40   network

network{ip-addr/prefix-length | ipv6-addr/prefix-length} [route-map map-name]

no network{ip-addr/prefix-length | ipv6-addr/prefix-length} [route-map map-name]

1.40.1   Purpose

Originates Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes that are advertised to peers for the BGP address family.

1.40.2   Command Mode

BGP address family configuration

1.40.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr/prefix-length

Specifies the IP address, in the form A.B.C.D, and the prefix length, separated by the slash (/) character. The range of values for the prefix-length argument is 0 to 32.

ipv6-addr/prefix-length

Specifies the IP Version 6 (IPv6) address, in the form A:B:C:D:E:F:G:H,and the prefix length, separated by the slash (/) character. The range of values for the prefix-length argument is 0 to 128.

route-map map-name

Optional. Route map conditions to apply to the prefix.

1.40.4   Default

No routes are specified.

1.40.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the network command to originate BGP routes that are advertised to peers.

Use the route-map map-name construct to apply a route map to modify the BGP attributes of these routes. Routes specified in the network command must exist in the routing table to generate those routes into BGP.

Note:  
The network command is available in the local context only. You cannot configure the network statement inside an IP VPN.

Use the no form of this command to remove routes.

1.40.6   Examples

The following example advertises unicast route 120.34.56.0/24 to unicast BGP neighbors. Multicast route 40.0.0.0/8 is advertised to multicast BGP neighbors using a metric of 100. The two ip route commands in context configuration mode statically add these routes to the routing table:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip route 40.0.0.0/8 null0

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip route 120.34.56.0/24 null0

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#route-map map1

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#set metric 100

[local]Redback(config-route-map)#exit

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#address-family ipv4 unicast

[local]Redback(config-bgp-af)#network 120.34.56.0/24

[local]Redback(config-bgp-af)#exit

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#address-family ipv4 multicast

[local]Redback(config-bgp-af)#network 40.0.0.0/8 route-map map1

1.41   network-type

network-type {broadcast | non-broadcast | point-to-point | point-to-multipoint}

no network-type

1.41.1   Purpose

Configures the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) or OSPF Version 3 (OSPFv3) network type.

1.41.2   Command Mode

1.41.3   Syntax Description

broadcast

Specifies that the interface is attached to a broadcast network.

non-broadcast

Specifies that the interface is attached to a nonbroadcast network.

point-to-point

Specifies that the interface is attached to a point-to-point (P2P) network.

point-to-multipoint

Specifies that the interface is attached to a point-to-multipoint (P2MP) network.

1.41.4   Default

The media type determines the network type; for example, an Ethernet interface defaults to the broadcast type.

1.41.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the network-type command to configure the following types of OSPF or OSPF3 networks:

Use the no form of this command to return the network type to its default value.

1.41.6   Examples

The following example configures the network type as a broadcast network:

[local]Redback(config-ospf-if)#network-type broadcast 

1.42   next-hop

next-hop next-hop-addr {loose | strict}

no next-hop next-hop-addr

1.42.1   Purpose

Configures a next-hop entry for a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) explicit route, or for a static label-switched path (LSP).

1.42.2   Command Mode

1.42.3   Syntax Description

next-hop-addr

IP address of the next-hop label-switched router (LSR).

loose

Specifies that the next hop does not need to be directly connected to the previous node.

strict

Specifies that the next hop is directly connected to the previous node in the path.

1.42.4   Default

Strict.

1.42.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the next-hop command to configure a next-hop entry for an RSVP explicit route, or for a static LSP.

Use the no form of this command to remove a next-hop entry from an RSVP explicit route. You cannot remove a next-hop entry from a static LSP.

1.42.6   Examples

The following example configures two next-hop entries for an RSVP explicit route:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp

[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#explicit-route ex-route02

[local]Redback(config-rsvp-explicit-route)#next-hop 13.1.1.2

[local]Redback(config-rsvp-explicit-route)#next-hop 14.1.1.2

The following example configures two next-hop entries for a static LSP:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router mpls-static

[local]Redback(config-mpls-static)#lsp 24

[local]Redback(config-mpls-static-lsp)#next-hop 20.20.20.10

[local]Redback(config-mpls-static-lsp)#next-hop 30.20.20.16

1.43   next-hop-on-lsp

next-hop-on-lsp

no next-hop-on-lsp

1.43.1   Purpose

Requires the next hop of a Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) Virtual Private Network (VPN) path to be reachable through a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) label-switched path (LSP) or a tunnel in order for a VPN route to be considered active.

1.43.2   Command Mode

BGP router configuration

1.43.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.43.4   Default

The next hop of a BGP VPN path must be reachable through an MPLS LSP or a tunnel in order for the VPN route to be considered active.

1.43.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the next-hop-on-lsp command to require the next hop of a BGP VPN path to be reachable through an MPLS LSP or a tunnel, in order for a VPN route to be considered active.

Use the no form of this command to enable a BGP VPN path to be considered active without requiring the next hop of a VPN path to be reachable through an MPLS LSP or a tunnel.

One common application for this command is configuring a BGP route reflector that is not part of an MPLS network, but is used to reflect BGP VPN routes to its clients within that MPLS network. In this configuration, the next hops of the VPN paths may not be reachable through an MPLS LSP or a tunnel from the route reflector's point of view. To solve the problem, use the no form of this command to disable the LSP or tunnel reachability check for the next hops, and therefore allow the BGP route reflector to correctly select the best paths and reflect the best paths to its clients.

1.43.6   Examples

The following example enables the sending of BGP VPN routes when the next hop is not resolved or reachable:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#next-hop-on-lsp

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#

1.44   next-hop-self

next-hop-self

no next-hop-self

1.44.1   Purpose

Advertises the local peer address as the next-hop address for all external Border Gateway Protocol (eBGP) routes sent to the specified neighbor or peer group.

1.44.2   Command Mode

1.44.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.44.4   Default

The command is disabled.

1.44.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the next-hop-self command to advertise the local peer address as the next-hop address for all eBGP routes sent to the specified BGP neighbor or peer group. This command disables the sending of third-party next-hop information to peers.

By default, when it receives BGP routes from an eBGP neighbor, the BGP routing process forwards eBGP routes to its internal BGP (iBGP) neighbors without changing the next-hop address; this is still the case if the eBGP neighbors are on the same subnet as the local BGP speaker.

When you enable the next-hop-self command, the BGP routing process changes the next-hop address, advertising the local peer address as the next-hop address for all received eBGP routes.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default behavior of sending third-party next-hop information to peers.

1.44.6   Examples

The following example ensures that all updates destined for the neighbor at IP address, 10.100.1.102, advertise this SmartEdge router as the next hop:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 64001

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 10.100.1.102 external

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#remote-as 64001

[local]Redback(config-bgp-neighbor)#next-hop-self

The following example provides output from the show bgp neighbor command where the neighbor views the SmartEdge router as the next hop for all received routes:

[local]Redback>show bgp neighbor 10.100.1.102



BGP neighbor: 10.100.1.102, remote AS: 64001, internal link

Version: 4, router identifier: 10.100.1.102

State: Established for 00:41:01

.

.

.

Next hop set to self (next-hop-self)

.

.

.

Prefixes: advertised 99877, accepted 2, active 2

1.45   nexthop triggered

nexthop triggered

no nexthop triggered

1.45.1   Purpose

Enables the triggering of an immediate BGP best-path calculation on notification of a next-hop change by the RIB.

1.45.2   Command Mode

BGP address family configuration

1.45.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.45.4   Default

Next-hop triggering is disabled.

1.45.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nexthop triggered command to the triggering of an immediate BGP best-path calculation on notification of a next-hop change by the RIB.

You must enter the nexthop triggered command separately for each BGP instance on which you want to enable next-hop triggering.

Note:  
The nexthop triggered command is supported for IPv4 BGP UNI address families only.

Use the no form of this command to disable next-hop triggering on a BGP instance.

1.45.6   Examples

The following example shows how to enable the triggering of an immediate BGP best-path calculation on notification of a next-hop change by the RIB:

[local]Redback#configure

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#address-family ipv4 vpn

[local]Redback(config-bgp-af)#nexthop triggered

1.46   nexthop triggered delay

nexthop triggered delay seconds

no nexthop triggered delay seconds

1.46.1   Purpose

Defines the minimum interval, in seconds, between next-hop scans.

1.46.2   Command Mode

BGP address family configuration

1.46.3   Syntax Description

seconds

Minimum number of seconds allowed between next-hop scans. Values range from 0 through 30 seconds. (1)A value of 0 triggers an immediate next-hop scan.

(1)  


1.46.4   Default

3 seconds

1.46.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nexthop triggered delay command to configure the minimum number of seconds allowed between next-hop scans. This delay allows time for network convergence when frequent next-hop change notifications occur.

Note:  
Next-hop-triggered BGP best-path calculation is supported for the IPv4 BGP address family only.

Use the no form of this command to return the router to the default setting in which next-hop scans occur every 3 seconds.

1.46.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the minimum interval between next-hop scans to be 20 seconds:

[local]Redback#configure

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#address-family ipv4 vpn

[local]Redback(config-bgp-af)#nexthop triggered delay 20

1.47   nexthop triggered holdtime

nexthop triggered holdtime seconds [backoff seconds] [delay seconds]

no nexthop triggered holdtime

1.47.1   Purpose

Defines the minimum interval, in seconds, between triggered RIB scans.

1.47.2   Command Mode

BGP address-family configuration

1.47.3   Syntax Description

seconds

Time, in seconds, between next-hop scans. The range of values is 1 through 30 seconds; the default value is 3. A value of 0 triggers an immediate next-hop scan.

backoffseconds

Optional. Time, in seconds, by which BGP increases the RIB scan frequency. The range of values is 0 through 30 seconds.

delayseconds

Optional. Number of seconds BGP waits before adding the configured backup value to the RIB scan frequency.

1.47.4   Default

holdtime seconds = 3 seconds

1.47.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nexthop triggered holdtime command to define the minimum interval, in seconds, between triggered RIB scans.

You must enter the nexthop triggered holdtime command separately for each BGP instance for which you want to define the minimum interval between triggered RIB scans.

Note:  
The nexthop triggered holdtime command is supported for IPv4 BGP UNI address families only.

Use the no form of this command to disable next-hop triggering on a BGP instance.

1.47.6   Examples

The following example shows how to configure the triggering of immediate BGP best path calculation on notification of a next-hop change by the RIB:

[local]Redback#configure

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#address-family ipv4 vpn

[local]Redback(config-bgp-af)#nexthop triggered holdtime 15

1.48   no debug all

debug all

1.48.1   Purpose

Disables the generation of all debug message types supported by the SmartEdge router.

1.48.2   Command Mode

exec (10)

1.48.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.48.4   Default

Debugging is disabled.

1.48.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the no debug all command to disable the generation of all debug messages types supported by the SmartEdge router. The no debug all command displays the functions of the debug commands, which are listed in Table 3.

Table 3    Related Debug Commands

Feature

Command

General system processes

debug rcm, debug snmp, debug ssh

IP routing

debug ip routing, debug isis all, debug ospf, debug policy general, debug rip, debug vrrp

BGP routing

debug bgp event, debug bgp listen, debug bgp message, debug bgp policy, debug bgp rib, debug bgp session-state, debug bgp update

IP services

debug arp, debug dhcp-relay, debug ip dns, debug nat, debug ntp

Quality of service

debug qos

Access control lists

debug cls, debug ip-access-list

Authentication

debug aaa

1.48.6   Examples

The following example disables the generation of all debugging messages:

[local]Redback#no debug all

1.49   notify

notify notify-oid

no notify

1.49.1   Purpose

Identifies the name of the notification you want to use for the SNMP alarm model.

1.49.2   Command Mode

SNMP alarm model configuration

1.49.3   Syntax Description

notify-oid

Object identifier (OID) in words or numbers of the notification you are using for the SNMP alarm model.

1.49.4   Default

None

1.49.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the notify command to identify the name of the notification to use for the SNMP alarm model. Set the name by identifying the OID (in name or number) of the notification to configure.

Use the no form of this command to remove the name of the notification for this alarm model.

1.49.6   Examples

The following example shows how to name the linkup notification as the notification for this alarm model.

[local]jazz#config
[local]jazz(config)#snmp alarm model 1 state clear
[local]jazz(config-snmp-alarmmodel)#notify linkUp
[local]jazz(config-snmp-alarmmodel)#

1.50   ns-retry-interval

ns-retry-interval retrans-timer

{no | default} ns-retry-interval

1.50.1   Purpose

Specifies the value for the Retrans Timer field.

1.50.2   Command Mode

1.50.3   Syntax Description

retrans-timer

Value for the Retrans Timer field (in milliseconds). The range of values is 0 to 4294967295; the default value is 5,000.

1.50.4   Default

The default value for the Retrans Timer field is 5,000.

1.50.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the ns-retry-interval command to specify the value for the Retrans Timer field, which is the time between retransmitted Neighbor Solicitation (NS) messages. In ND profile configuration mode, this command specifies the value for the specified ND profile. In ND router configuration mode, this command specifies the global value for all interfaces; in ND router interface configuration mode, it specifies the value for this ND router interface. If specified, the setting for the interface overrides the global setting.

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default value for the Retrans Timer field.

In the ND profile configuration mode, only the default form of this command is available to specify the default value for the Retrans Timer field. The no form of this command is not available.

1.50.6   Examples

The following example specifies 30 milliseconds for the Retrans Timer field for the ND profile ndprofile7:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#nd profile ndprofile7

[local]Redback(config-nd-profile)#ns-retry-interval 30

The following example specifies 100 milliseconds for the Retrans Timer field for the ND router:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router nd

[local]Redback(config-nd-if)#ns-retry-interval 100

The following example specifies 20 milliseconds for the Retrans Timer field for the ND router interface, int1, which overrides the global setting:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router nd

[local]Redback(config-nd)#interface int1

[local]Redback(config-nd-if)#ns-retry-interval 20

1.51   nssa-range

nssa-rangeip-addr {netmask| /prefix-length} [not-advertise | tag tag]

no nssa-rangeip-addr {netmask| /prefix-length} [not-advertise | tag tag]

1.51.1   Purpose

Summarizes not-so-stubby-area (NSSA) routes advertised by an area border router (ABR).

1.51.2   Command Mode

1.51.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

IP address in the form A.B.C.D.

netmask

Network mask in the form E.F.G.H.

prefix-length

Prefix length. The range of values is 0 to 32.

not-advertise

Optional. Prevents all routes in the specified range from being advertised in inter-area route summarizations.

tag tag

Optional. Route tag included in translated external route summarization Type 5 link-state advertisements (LSAs). An unsigned 32-bit integer, the range of values is 1 to 4,294,967,295; the default value is 0.

1.51.4   Default

Address ranges for NSSA route summarization are not specified.

1.51.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the nssa-range command to summarize NSSA routes advertised by an ABR. This command is used for NSSA-translated external route summarization and is only relevant when the router is configured as an ABR.

Use the optional not-advertise keyword to prevent the specified route from being advertised in translated external route summarizations.

Use the no form of this command to disable route summarization for a particular summary range. All individual routes contained in the summary range are advertised to other areas.

1.51.6   Examples

The following example sends routes that fall into the range 10.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 as a single autonomous system (AS) external advertisement:

[local]Redback(config-ospf-area)#nssa-range 10.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 

1.52   ntp-broadcast

ntp-broadcast [delay-num]

{no | default} ntp-broadcast [delay-num]

1.52.1   Purpose

Enables an NTP server to broadcast time updates to all clients on a subnet.

1.52.2   Command Mode

interface configuration

1.52.3   Syntax Description

delay-num

Time delay for NTP broadcasts, in microseconds (ms); the valid range is 0 to 999,999. The default is 3000.

1.52.4   Default

The NTP server does not broadcast time updates.

1.52.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the ntp-broadcast command in interface mode to enable the NTP server for a context to broadcast time updates to NTP clients. The clients must be on the same subnet as the server. Add the ntp-broadcast command to the interface leading to the subnet; set the broadcast address to 255.255.255.255.

Use the no form of the command to disable the NTP server from broadcasting time updates to its clients.

1.52.6   Examples

The following example enables NTP broadcast on the ntp interface in a context set up as an NTP server.

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface ntp
[local]Redback(config-if)#ntp-broadcast

1.53   ntp-mode

ntp-mode

1.53.1   Purpose

Enters NTP server configuration mode.

1.53.2   Command Mode

context configuration

1.53.3   Syntax Descriptions

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.53.4   Default

None

1.53.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the ntp-mode command to enter NTP server configuration mode.

1.53.6   Examples

The following example changes the mode from context configuration to NTP server configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config)#ntp-mode

[local]Redback(config-ntp-server)#

1.54   num-queues

In EDRR, MDRR, PQ, and PWFQ policy configuration modes, the command syntax is:

num-queues {1 | 2 | 4 | 8}

{no | default} num-queues

In ATMWFQ policy and queue map configuration modes, the command syntax is:

num-queues {2 | 4 | 8}

{no | default} num-queues

1.54.1   Purpose

In ATMWFQ, EDRR, MDRR, PQ, or PWFQ policy configuration mode, specifies the number of queues for the policy.

In queue map configuration mode, specifies the number of queues for the quality of service (QoS) queue map, and enters num-queues configuration mode.

1.54.2   Command Mode

1.54.3   Syntax Description

1

Specifies that the policy has one queue.(1)

2

Specifies that the policy has two queues.(2)

4

Specifies that the policy has four queues. (1)

8

Specifies that the policy has eight queues. (1)

(1)  In EDRR, MDRR, PQ, and PWFQ policy configuration modes

(2)  In ATMWFQ and queue map configuration modes


1.54.4   Default

1.54.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the num-queues command in ATMWFQ policy, EDRR policy, MDRR policy, PQ policy, or PWFQ policy configuration mode to specify the number of queues to be used for the policy.

Use the num-queues command in queue map configuration mode to specify number of queues for the queue map, and to enter num-queues configuration mode.

A queue map consists of three independent subprofiles—one each for num-queues equal to 2, 4, and 8. The only function of the num-queues command in the queue-map configuration context is to enter the configuration mode for one of the three subprofiles so the priority mapping settings for that num-queues value can be modified from the default (8). To modify the default number of queues to use for a circuit, configure the num-queues command of the queuing policy. This configuration then determines which of the num-queues-indexed subprofiles of the queue map is relevant for a circuit subject to the queuing policy in question.


 Caution! 
Risk of dropping packets. Modifying the parameters of an ATMWFQ policy will momentarily interrupt the traffic on all ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) using the policy. To reduce the risk, use caution when modifying ATMWFQ policy parameters.

 Caution! 
Risk of traffic disruption. Modifying the parameters of an MDRR policy momentarily removes the rate applied to all 10GE circuits using the policy. The rate is restored as soon as the change is effective. To reduce the risk, use caution when modifying MDRR policy parameters.
Note:  
For information about the correlation between the number of queues configured on a particular traffic card type and the corresponding number of virtual circuits (VCs) allowed per port (and per traffic card), see Configuring Contexts and Interfaces.

Use the no or default form of this command to specify the default number of queues.

1.54.6   Examples

The following example configures the PQ policy, firstout, to have 4 queues:

[local]Redback(config)#qos policy firstout pq

[local]Redback(config-policy-pq)#num-queues 4