COMMAND DESCRIPTION     20/190 82-CRA 119 1170/1-V1 Uen E    

Commands: show g through show j

© Ericsson AB 2009–2010. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List

SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

Contents

1Command Descriptions
1.1show gre
1.2show gre counters
1.3show hardware
1.4show history
1.5show http-redirect circuit
1.6show icmp statistics
1.7show igmp bandwidth-profile
1.8show igmp circuit
1.9show igmp group
1.10show igmp group-bandwidth
1.11show igmp interface
1.12show igmp service-profile
1.13show igmp snooping access-group name
1.14show igmp snooping bridge
1.15show igmp snooping circuit
1.16show igmp snooping group
1.17show igmp snooping mrouter
1.18show igmp traffic
1.19show inverse-arp counters
1.20show ip access-list
1.21show ip host
1.22show ip interface
1.23show ip mroute
1.24show ip pool
1.25show ip prefix-list
1.26show ip route
1.27show ip route all
1.28show ip route bgp
1.29show ip route client
1.30show ip route connected
1.31show ip route fib-client
1.32show ip route hidden
1.33show ip route iphost
1.34show ip route isis
1.35show ip route martian
1.36show ip route mobile-ip
1.37show ip route multicast
1.38show ip route next-hop
1.39show ip route ospf
1.40show ip route registered
1.41show ip route rip
1.42show ip route static
1.43show ip route subscriber
1.44show ip route summary
1.45show ip route summary all-context
1.46show ip route xcrp
1.47show ip statistics xcrp
1.48show ipv6 access-list
1.49show ipv6 all-host
1.50show ipv6 dynamic-host
1.51show ipv6 host
1.52show ipv6 interface
1.53show ipv6 mroute
1.54show ipv6 pool
1.55show ipv6 prefix-list
1.56show ipv6 route
1.57show isis adjacency
1.58show isis adj-log
1.59show isis database
1.60show isis debug-setting
1.61show isis dynamic-hostname
1.62show isis interfaces
1.63show isis protocol-summary
1.64show isis routes
1.65show isis spf-log
1.66show isis statistics
1.67show isis summary-address
1.68show isis topology
1.69show isp-log
1.70show isp-log state


1   Command Descriptions

Commands starting with “show g” through commands starting “show j” are included.

1.1   show gre

show gre [slot/port:ch:sub] [bvi bvi-name | l2vpn-cross-connect | lg lg-name]

1.1.1   Purpose

Displays a Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) tunnel or tunnel circuit information.

1.1.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.1.3   Syntax Description

slot/port:ch:sub

Specifies the slot, port, channel, and subchannel for which the command displays GRE tunnel information.

bvi bvi-name

Specifies the name of the bridged virtual interface (BVI) for which the command displays GRE tunnel information.

l2vp-cross-connect

Specifies the command displays GRE tunnel information only for L2VPN cross connects.

lg lg-name

Specifies the name of the link group for which the command displays GRE tunnel information.

1.1.4   Default

Displays information for all GRE tunnels in the current context.

1.1.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show gre command to display a GRE tunnel or tunnel circuit information.

Table 1    Field Descriptions for the show gre Command

Field

Description

Name

Name of the GRE tunnel.

Context

Context in which the GRE tunnel was created.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit (MTU) of GRE tunnel.

Local IP

Local IP address of the GRE tunnel.

Remote IP

Remote IP address of the GRE tunnel.

Bound to

Interface and context to which GRE tunnel circuit is bound as entered in the bind interface command (in tunnel configuration mode).

State

You can see the following states:


  • Shut—Tunnel is disabled by shutdown command.

  • Up—Tunnel can send and receive traffic.

  • Down—Tunnel cannot send and receive traffic.

Note:  
If the GRE tunnel has no circuits configured, the state is always down, even after you have entered the no shutdown command in (GRE peer configuration mode).

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.1.6   Examples

The following example displays configuration information for the GRE tunnel circuit with key 1:

[local]Redback>show gre
Tunnel/Context        Key        Remote-IP       State      Bound to
toBoston@local        1          172.16.1.2      Down       CorpA@VPNa 

1.2   show gre counters

show gre counters [detail] [persistent]

1.2.1   Purpose

Displays general counters and counters specific to Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) tunnel circuits for all GRE tunnel circuits in the system.

1.2.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.2.3   Syntax Description

detail

Optional. Specifies that more details are displayed for each tunnel circuit.

persistent

Optional. If omitted, displays values since the counters were last cleared. If specified, displays values since the system was last reloaded.

1.2.4   Default

None

1.2.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show gre counters command to display general counters and counters specific to GRE tunnel circuits for all GRE tunnel circuits in the system.

Use the detail keyword to display detailed information about each tunnel circuit.

Use the persistent keyword to display values since the system was last reloaded.

Each tunnel circuit is identified by its key and the remote IP address of the tunnel for which the tunnel circuit is configured.

Note:  
This command is an alias for the show circuit counters gre command (in exec mode).

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.2.6   Examples

The following example displays GRE counters for all tunnel circuits:

[local]Redback>show gre counters
Circuit                      Packets/Bytes Sent  Packets/Bytes Received

GRE to 172.16.1.2      key 1                  0                       0

                                              0                       0

GRE to 172.16.1.2      key 2                  0                       0

                                              0                       0

1.3   show hardware

show hardware [alarm-card |backplane | card slot | fantray] [detail]

1.3.1   Purpose

Displays information about the system hardware.

1.3.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.3.3   Syntax Description

alarm-card

Optional. Displays information about the alarm card for a SmartEdge 400 chassis. This keyword is not available for the SmartEdge 100 or SmartEdge 800 chassis.

backplane

Optional. Displays information about the backplane.

card slot

Optional. Chassis slot number. Displays information about the card in the specified slot only.

fantray

Optional. Displays information about the fantray or the fan and alarm unit. This keyword is not available for the SmartEdge 100 chassis.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.3.4   Default

When used without any optional syntax, this command displays a summary of all the hardware in the system.

1.3.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show hardware command to display information about the system hardware. Use the optional syntax to widen or narrow the scope of the display.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

Table 2 describes the output fields for the show hardware command without the detail keyword.

Table 2    Field Descriptions for the show hardware Command

Field Name

Field Data Reported and Data Descriptions

Fan Tray Status

  • Present—Fan and alarm unit (SmartEdge 800 chassis) or fan tray (SmartEdge 400 chassis) is installed.

  • Not Present—Fan and alarm unit (SmartEdge 800 chassis) or fan tray (SmartEdge 400 chassis) is not installed or not working.

Fan(s) Status

  • Failed—At least one fan is not working.

  • Normal—All fans are working.

SmartEdge 100 chassis:


  • AC Power Supply Status

  • DC Power Supply A Status

  • DC Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 100 chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

SmartEdge 400 chassis:


  • Power Supply A Status

  • Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 400 with AC Power Supply:


  • AC Unit No Power—The AC power supply is not installed or is not fully inserted.

  • AC Unit High Temp—High temperature has been detected at the AC source.

  • AC Unit Failure—AC power source has failed.

  • AC Unit Normal—Power is being supplied by the AC source.


SmartEdge 400 with DC Power Supply:


  • DC Unit Normal—Power is being supplied by the DC source.

  • No Power—DC Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

SmartEdge 600 chassis:


  • Power Supply A Status

  • Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 600 with AC Power Supply:


  • AC Unit No Power—The AC power supply is not installed or is not fully inserted.

  • AC Unit High Temp—High temperature has been detected at the AC source.

  • AC Unit Failure—AC power source has failed.

  • AC Unit Normal—Power is being supplied by the AC source.


SmartEdge 400 with DC Power Supply:


  • DC Unit Normal—Power is being supplied by the DC source.

  • No Power—DC Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

SmartEdge 800 chassis:


  • Power Supply A Status

  • Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 800 chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

SmartEdge 1200 chassis:


  • Power Supply A1 Status

  • Power Supply A2 Status

  • Power Supply B1 Status

  • Power Supply B2 Status

SmartEdge 1200 chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

SmartEdge 1200H chassis:


  • Power Supply A1 Status

  • Power Supply A2 Status

  • Power Supply B1 Status

  • Power Supply B2 Status

SmartEdge 1200H chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

Active Alarms

Alarm conditions for this unit:


  • NONE—No alarm conditions exist.

  • condition—Alarm condition is in effect.


For a complete list of conditions that can cause an alarm, see Alarms and Probable Causes.

Slot

  • slot—Slot number for this unit.

  • N/A—No slot number for this unit.

Type

Unit:


  • alarm card—Alarm card (SmartEdge 400 chassis only) is installed.

  • backplane—Backplane.

  • carrier—I/O carrier card (SmartEdge 100 chassis only).

  • controller-card-type—Controller card is installed (XCRP type).

  • fan tray—Fan and alarm unit (SmartEdge 800 chassis) or fan tray (SmartEdge 400 and SmartEdge 1200 chassis) is installed.

  • traffic-card-type—Traffic card is installed; see Table 12.

  • MIC-type—MIC is installed; for a list of MIC types, see Table 12 Table 11.

  • sse—SmartEdge Storage Engine is installed.

  • unknown—Controller card is inserted but not initialized.

Mfg Date

dd/mm/yyyy—Date unit was manufactured.

Voltage

  • N/A—Voltage is not applicable for this unit.

  • NOT OK—Voltage for this card is outside its operating range.

  • OK—Voltage for this card is within its operating range.

Temperature

Temperature condition and actual temperature reading in degrees Celsius:


  • NORMAL/COLD—Temperature is within normal operating range for this unit.

  • TEMP_HOT—Temperature is hotter than normal.

  • TEMP_EXTREME—Temperature is much hotter than normal.

  • N/A—Temperature does not apply to this unit.


Table 4 lists descriptions of each temperature condition.


Table 5 lists temperature ranges for card types.

Table 3 describes the output fields for the show hardware command with the detail keyword.

Table 3    Field Descriptions for the show hardware Command with the detail Keyword

Field Name

Field Data Reported and Data Descriptions

Active Alarms(1)

Alarm conditions for this unit:


  • NONE—No alarm conditions exist.

  • condition—Alarm condition is in effect.


For a complete list of conditions that can cause an alarm, see Alarms and Probable Causes.

Air filter date

yyyy-mm—Date the air filter is due to be replaced (SmartEdge 400 and SmartEdge 800 chassis).

Alarm Card Status

  • Present—Alarm card is installed and working (SmartEdge 400 chassis only).

  • Not Present—Alarm card is not installed (SmartEdge 400 chassis only).

Card Status

For traffic cards only:


  • FPGA mismatch—Card needs an FPGA upgrade.

  • FPGA upgrade—FPGA upgrade has been started.

  • HW detected—Card is detected and being initialized.

  • HW failure—Card has experienced a failure.

  • HW initialized—Card is initialized and ready.

Chass Entitlement

Type of chassis for which this card is intended:


  • All—Card is entitled in every chassis.

  • List of chassis, separated by slashes (/)—Listed chassis only.

Chassis Type

Type of chassis in which the backplane is installed:


  • SE100—SmartEdge 100 chassis.

  • SE400—SmartEdge 400 chassis.

  • SE800—SmartEdge 800 chassis.

  • SE1200—SmartEdge 1200 chassis.

CLEI Code

Common Language Equipment Identifier (CLEI) code for this SFP optical transceiver; blank if not applicable for this transceiver.

Connector Type

MIC port connector:


  • Copper—RJ-45 connector.

  • Optical—SFP optical transceiver (LC) connector.

CPLD Version

n—Version of the complex programmable logic device (CPLD) on the MIC.

DimFpga rev DimFpga file rev

Dim FPGA revision and file revision; N/A or not displayed if not applicable for this card.

Disk

SSE disk number; 1 or 2.

EEPROM id/ver

nnnn/n—Version of the unit EEPROM.

EPPA memory

nnn MB—Size of ingress and egress PPA memory.

Fan Tray Status

  • Present—Fan and alarm unit (SmartEdge 800 chassis) or fan tray (SmartEdge 400 or SmartEdge 1200 chassis) is installed.

  • Not Present—Fan and alarm unit (SmartEdge 800 chassis) or fan tray (SmartEdge 400 or SmartEdge 1200 chassis) is not installed or not working.

Fan(s) Status

  • Failed—At least one fan is not working.

  • Normal—All fans are working.

FlipFpga rev

FLIP FPGA revision and file revision; N/A or not displayed if not applicable for this traffic card.

Hardware Rev

n—Hardware revision level for this unit; single digit.

HubFpga rev


HubFpga file rev

Hub FPGA revision and file revision; N/A or not displayed if not applicable for this card.

IPPA memory

nnn MB—Size of ingress and egress PPA memory.

ITU ch

International Telecommunications Union (ITU) channel number (corresponds to the wavelength displayed in the Wavelength field); not displayed if not applicable for the transceiver installed in this port.

LEDs

State of Fail, Active, Standby, and Sync LEDs:


  • Blink—ODD test is in progress.

  • On—LED is lit.

  • Off—LED is not lit.


Sync LED is for controller cards only.

LimFpga rev

LIM FPGA revision and file revision; N/A or not displayed if not applicable for this traffic card.

MAC Address

nn:nn:nn:nn:nn:nn—Medium access control (MAC) address of the system (stored in the EEPROM); displayed using the backplane keyword only.

Memory

Memory for which this controller card is entitled:


  • Max—All memory on the controller card is enabled.

  • nnnn MB—Size in MB of enabled memory.

Mfg Date

dd/mm/yyyy—Date this unit was manufactured.

MIC n

For each MIC slot n:


  • MIC-type—For a list of MIC types, see Table 11.

  • Not Present—MIC is not installed.

MinnowCPLD Ver

Minnow CPLD revision; applicable to the SmartEdge 100 chassis slot 1 only.

Model

SSE disk model; vendor in parentheses.

ODD Status

Status of the on-demand diagnostics (ODD) tests:


  • Aborted—The session was terminated by the user or, for controller cards only, by the standby controller card being removed.

  • Incomplete—At least one of the requested tests could not be run.

  • In-progress—Session is currently in progress.

  • Not available—No session of the ODD has been run for this unit.

  • Passed—All tests have passed.

  • n Failure(s)—One or more tests have failed.

POD Status

Status of the power-on diagnostics (POD) tests:


  • Success—Unit passed all POD tests.

  • Failure—Unit failed one or more POD tests.

Port

n—Port number if hardware data is port specific; not displayed if not applicable for this card.

Ports Configurable

Number of ports on this traffic card that have been specified as software configurable (ATM DS-3 traffic card only).

Ports Entitled

List of ports that are entitled on this traffic card or MIC:


  • n1, n2, n3,...—Entitled ports.

  • All—All physical ports on the traffic card are entitled.

SmartEdge 100 chassis:


  • AC Power Supply Status

  • DC Power Supply A Status

  • DC Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 100 chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

SmartEdge 400 chassis:


  • Power Supply A Status

  • Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 400 with AC Power Supply:


  • AC Unit No Power—The AC power supply is not installed or is not fully inserted.

  • AC Unit High Temp—High temperature has been detected at the AC source.

  • AC Unit Failure—AC power source has failed.

  • AC Unit Normal—Power is being supplied by the AC source.


SmartEdge 400 with DC Power Supply:


  • DC Unit Normal—Power is being supplied by the DC source.

  • No Power—DC Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

SmartEdge 800 chassis:


  • Power Supply A Status

  • Power Supply B Status

SmartEdge 800 chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

SmartEdge 1200 chassis:


  • Power Supply A1 Status

  • Power Supply A2 Status

  • Power Supply B1 Status

  • Power Supply B2 Status

SmartEdge 1200 chassis:


  • No Power—Power has failed, is disconnected, or is not installed.

  • Normal—Power is being supplied by this power supply.

RedbackApproved

State of transceiver testing for this SFP optical transceiver in SmartEdge router:s:


  • No—Not tested.

  • Yes—Tested.

RxPwrMin[dbm](2)


RxPwrMax[dbm]

-nn.nn—Receiver sensitivity (minimum) and overload level (maximum) for the version of the SFP transceiver installed in this port.

S3Fpga rev

S3 FPGA revision and file revision; applicable to XCRP only. This FPGA manages the control and phase alignment of the Stratum-3 PLL.

SAR Image Type

ATM mode currently loaded; applicable to ATM DS-3 and second-generation ATM OC traffic cards only:(3)


  • atm priority—ATM priority mode.

  • ip-priority—IP priority mode.

  • vc-fair—Virtual circuit (VC) fairness mode.

  • hsvc-fair—Hierarchical shaping virtual circuit (HSVC) fairness mode.

SAR Image Version

n.n.n.n—Version of the image.

SARC memory

nnn MB—Size of segmentation and reassembly controller (SARC) memory; applicable to ATM traffic cards only.

SARC status

Status of the segmentation and reassembly controller (SARC):


  • OK—SARC is ready.

  • Not Ready—SARC is not ready.

  • Unknown—Unable to read SARC status.

SCC id

ID for the system communication controller (SCC) ASIC on a controller card; the SCC controls and communicates with the traffic cards.

Serial No

nnnnnnnnnnnnnn—Unique identifier for this unit; 14 alphanumeric characters.

COLD

Expected when the system first powers up in a cool or well air-conditioned environment.

NORMAL

Normal operating temperature.

HOT

The card is running above normal operating temperature. The lifespan of the card will likely be reduced if this condition persists. The ambient temperature of the room could be too hot, or the chassis air filter or fans might need cleaning or replacing.


When the card temperature is greater than TEMP_HOT for longer than 5 minutes, the system generates a minor alarm; if the condition persists longer than one hour, it generates a major alarm.

EXTREME

The card is running well above normal operating temperature. The lifespan of the card will be reduced if this condition persists. The ambient temperature of the room is likely too hot, or the chassis air filter or fans might need cleaning or replacing.


When the card temperature reaches TEMP_EXTREME, the system generates a major alarm.

N/A

Temperature does not apply to this unit, or this unit does not have a built-in temperature sensor.

SFP / Media type

SFP Transceivers—Ethernet line cards:


  • FX / MM—Short reach transceiver, multimode fiber.

  • LX10 / SM—Long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • SX / MM—Short reach transceiver, multimode fiber.

  • LX / SM—Long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • ZX / SM—Extended long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • BX / SM—Bidirectional transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • T / Cat5—Copper-based transceiver.

  • CWDM / SM—Coarse wavelength-division multiplexing (CWDM) transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • DWDM / SM—Dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) transceiver, single-mode fiber.

SFP transceivers—SONET/SDH OC-n (OC-48c/STM-16c, OC-12c/STM-4c, and OC-3c/STM-1c) cards:


  • SR / MM—Short reach transceiver, multimode fiber.

  • SR / SM—Short reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • IR / SM—Intermediate reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • LR / SM—Long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

SFP Serial No

nnnnnnnnnn—Unique identifier for this transceiver; 10 alphanumeric characters.

Slot

  • slot—Slot number for this unit.

  • N/A—No slot number for this unit.

SlipFpga file rev

SLIP FPGA revision; applicable to the SmartEdge 100 I/O carrier card functions only (slot 1).

Spec Capacity

SSE disk hardware specification capacity.

SpiFpga file rev

System Packet Interface File revision.

SpiFpga rev

System Packet Interface Fpga.

Start/Stop count

Number of times the SSE disk has been started/stopped; maximum number of starts/stops in disk lifetime in parentheses.

SXC id

ID of the SONET cross-connect (SXC) ASIC on a controller card; the SXC cross-connects traffic between some traffic cards.

SysFpga rev

System FPGA revision and file revision; N/A or not displayed if not applicable for this traffic card.

Temperature

Temperature condition and actual temperature reading in degrees Celsius:


  • Cold—Temperature is colder than normal.

  • Normal—Temperature is within normal operating range for this unit.

  • Hot—Temperature is hotter than normal.

  • Extreme—Temperature is much hotter than normal.

  • N/A—Temperature does not apply to this unit.


Table 4 lists descriptions of each temperature condition.


Table 5 lists temperature ranges for card types.

TxPwrMin[dbm] (2)


TxPwrMax[dbm]

-nn.nn—Transmitter optical output power (minimum and maximum) for the version of the SFP transceiver installed in this port.

Type

Unit:


  • alarm card—Alarm card (SmartEdge 400 chassis only) is installed.

  • backplane—Backplane.

  • carrier—I/O carrier card (SmartEdge 100 chassis only).

  • controller-card-type—Controller card is installed; see Table 11 for the SmartEdge 100 chassis and Table 12 for all other SmartEdge chassis.

  • fan tray—Fan and alarm unit (SmartEdge 800 chassis) or fan tray (SmartEdge 400 and SmartEdge 1200 chassis) is installed.

  • traffic-card-type—Traffic card is installed; see Table 12.

  • MIC-type—MIC is installed; see Table 11.

Voltage

Readings for voltage sources 1.5V, 1.8V, 2.6V, 3.3V, 5V, and 12V along with the percentage over or under the nominal value.

Wavelength (2)

Center wavelength for the version of the SFP optical transceiver installed in this port:


  • 0.00 [nm]—Wavelength is not reported by this transceiver.

  • nnnn.nn [nm]—Wavelength for this transceiver version.


See Transceivers for SmartEdge and SM Family Line Cards for wavelength data for each type of transceiver and its versions.

XFP / Media type

10-Gbps SFP (XFP) transceivers—10-GE and SONET/SDH OC-192 line cards:


  • SR / SM—Short reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • SW / SM—Short reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • SR / MM—Short reach transceiver, multimode fiber.

  • IR / SM—Intermediate reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • LR / SM—Long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • LW / SM—Long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • ER / SM—Extended long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • EW / SM—Extended long reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.

  • ZR / SM—Extreme reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.(4)

  • ZW / SM—Extreme reach transceiver, single-mode fiber.(5)

  • DWDM / SM—Dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) transceiver, single-mode fiber.(6)(7)

  • 10000Base-DWDM—OTN Dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) transceiver, single-mode fiber.(8)

(1)  Alarm severities conform to the definitions provided in Generic Requirements, GR-474-CORE, Issue 1, December 1997, Network Maintenance: Alarm and Control for Network Elements.

(2)  Measured or reported values meet or exceed the transceiver specifications that are documented in Transceivers for SmartEdge and SM Family Cards.

(3)  The 8-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c (atm-oc3e-8-port) and 2-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c cards support only the “vc-fair" and "hsvc-fair" atm modes.

(4)  Use part number XFP-OC192-LR2 when ordering the XFP transceivers with 10GE ZR functionality.

(5)  Use part number XFP-OC192-LR2 when ordering the XFP transceivers with 10GE ZR functionality.

(6)  In Releases 6.1.4 and 6.1.5, 10GE DWDM XFP transceivers support only ITU channels 35,36,37,53,and 54.

(7)  In Release 6.4.1, 10GE OTN XFP transceivers support only ITU channels 35,36,37,53,and 54.

(8)  In Releases 6.4.1, 10GE OTN DWDM XFP transceivers support only ITU channels 35,36,37,53,and 54.


Note:  
Alarm severities conform to the definitions provided in Generic Requirements, GR-474-CORE, Issue 1, December 1997, Network Maintenance: Alarm and Control for Network Elements.

See SmartEdge 100 MICs and Controller Card for the list of the MICs and controller carrier cards of the SmartEdge 100 router.

SmartEdge 400 and SmartEdge 800 Cards (continued) and SmartEdge 1200 Cards list the traffic, services, and controller card types for all other SmartEdge routers. The same traffic card type is also displayed for the low-density version of the traffic card. In the table, the IR abbreviation refers to Intermediate Reach.

Table 5 lists the definitions of the temperature range for each condition. The actual temperature reading in degrees Celsius displays with the detail keyword.

The temperature ranges listed in Table 5 can vary slightly, depending on the version of the controller or traffic card.

Table 4    Descriptions of Temperature Conditions

Condition

Description

COLD

Expected when the system first powers up in a cool or well air-conditioned environment.

NORMAL

Normal operating temperature.

HOT

The card is running above normal operating temperature. The lifespan of the card will likely be reduced if this condition persists. The ambient temperature of the room could be too hot, or the chassis air filter or fans might need cleaning or replacing.


When the card temperature is greater than TEMP_HOT for longer than 5 minutes, the system generates a minor alarm; if the condition persists longer than one hour, it generates a major alarm.

EXTREME

The card is running well above normal operating temperature. The lifespan of the card will be reduced if this condition persists. The ambient temperature of the room is likely too hot, or the chassis air filter or fans might need cleaning or replacing.


When the card temperature reaches TEMP_EXTREME, the system generates a major alarm.

N/A

Temperature does not apply to this unit, or this unit does not have a built-in temperature sensor.

Table 5    Temperature Ranges for Card Types

Card Type

Temperature Ranges

atm-oc3e-8-port


atm-oc12e-2-port


oc3e-8-port


oc12e-4-port


oc48e-4-port

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 20 - 71°C


HOT = 72 - 93°C


EXTREME 94°C

atm-oc3-2-port


atm-oc3-4-port


atm-oc12e-1-port


atm-oc12-1-port


atm-ds3-12-port


oc3-8-port


oc12-4-port


oc-48-1-port


e3-6-port


ether-12-port


ge-4-port


gigaether-4-port


ds3-12-port


ch-ds3-12-port


ch-ds3-3-port


ch-e1ds0-24-port

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 70°C


HOT = 71- 80°C


EXTREME 81°C

oc192-1-port


ge-10-port


ge-20-port


ge3-4-port


ge-5-port


ge2-10-port


10ge-1-port


10ge-oc192-1-port

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 84°C


HOT = 85 - 94°C


EXTREME 95°C

fege-60-2-port

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 89°C


HOT = 90 - 103°C


EXTREME 104°C

ge4-20-port


10ge-4-port

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 85°C


HOT = 86 - 103°C


EXTREME 104°C

ase

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 70°C


HOT = 71- 76°C


EXTREME 77°C

sse

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 75°C


HOT = 76- 80°C


EXTREME 81°C

xcrp4

COLD 20°C


NORMAL = 21 - 90°C


HOT = 91- 100°C


EXTREME 100°C

1.3.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show hardware command for a SmartEdge 800 chassis:

[local]Redback>show hardware

Fan Tray Status            Present
Fan(s) Status              Normal
Power Supply A Status      Normal
Power Supply B Status      No Power
Active Alarms              NONE

Slot Type                 Serial No      Rev Ver Mfg Date    Voltage  Temp     
---- -------------------- -------------- --- --- ----------- -------- -------
N/A  backplane            9C2B4090100100   2   2 13-OCT-2001 N/A      N/A    
N/A  fan tray             9D034090100100   3   2 13-OCT-2001 N/A      N/A    
1    oc3-8-port           8J0O8040200063  15   4 30-APR-2002 Ok       Normal 
2    ch-ds3-12-port       8V0U8050200068  21   4 14-MAY-2002 Ok       Normal 
3    atm-ds3-12-port      7Q0E5060200025   5   4 01-JUL-2002 Ok       Normal 
4    atm-oc3-2-port       8F0P8070210270  16   4 07-AUG-2002 Ok       Normal 
5    ether-12-port        7UAA8070200197  27   4 30-JUL-2002 Ok       Normal 
7    xcrp3                6Y0O5060300038  15   4 09-APR-2003 N/A      Normal 
8    xcrp3                6Y0O5060300064  15   4 02-APR-2005 N/A      Normal 
10   ch-oc12ds1-1-port    8I018050200080   1   4 31-MAY-2002 Ok       Normal 
11   ds3-12-port          7P0F8050200058   6   4 29-MAY-2002 Ok       Normal 
14   gigaether-4-port     8K0X8050200139  24   4 16-MAY-2002 Ok       Normal 

The following example displays detailed output for the SFP/media type on a traffic card for the SmartEdge 800 chassis:

[local]Redback#show hardware card 10 detail

Slot              : 10               Type              : ge-20-port
Serial No         : B10D5050500014   Hardware Rev      : 4
EEPROM id/ver     : 0x5a/4           Mfg Date          : 21-MAY-2005
HubFpga rev       : 0x3b             HubFpga file rev  : 0x3b
SpiFpga rev       : 0x6              SpiFpga file rev  : 0x6
IPPA memory       : 1024 MB          EPPA memory       : 1024 MB
Voltage 1.5V      : 1.523 (+2%)      Voltage 1.8V      : 1.813 (+1%)
Voltage 2.6V      : 2.480 (-1%)      Voltage 3.3V      : 3.304 (+0%)
Temperature       : NORMAL (52 C)    SFP
Card Status       : HW initialized   POD Status        : Success
ODD Status        : Not Available
Fail LED          : Off              Active LED        : On
Standby LED       : N/A
Chass Entitlement : SE400/SE800
Ports Entitled    : All
Active Alarms     : NONE
Port              : 1                SFP / Media Type  : CWDM / MM
RedbackApproved   : Y                Wavelength        : 1591.00[nm]
CLEI code         :                  RxPwrMin/Max[dbm] :   1995 / -    39
ITU ch            : 7 
TxPwrMin/Max[dbm] :  31622 / - 10000 

The following example displays detailed output for the alarm card in a SmartEdge 400 chassis:

[local]Redback>show hardware alarm-card detail

Slot              : N/A              Type              : alarm card      
Serial No         : 0D0B5060300017   Hardware Rev      : 2               
EEPROM id/ver     : 0x5a/4           Mfg Date          : 21-jun-2003     
Air filter date   : 2005-10
ODD Status        : N/A
Temperature       : NORMAL (24 C) 

The following example displays detailed output for a controller card in a SmartEdge 800 chassis:

[local]Redback>show hardware card 7 detail

Slot              : 7                Type              : xcrp - T1 BITS  
Serial No         : 8S018040200129   Hardware Rev      : 1               
EEPROM id/ver     : 0x5a/2           Mfg Date          : 09-APR-2002     
OpusFpga Ver      : 0x7              S3Fpga Ver        : 0x7             
MaxFpga Ver       : 0x3              ForteFpga Ver     : 0x6             
SCC id            : 0x0              SXC id            : 0x1f            
Temperature       : Normal (38 C)    POD Status        : Success
ODD Status        : N/A
Fail LED          : Off              Active LED        : On              
Standby LED       : Off              Sync LED          : Off             
Chass Entitlement : SE400/SE800      Memory            : Max 
Active Alarms     : NONE

The following example displays detailed output for an ATM DS-3 traffic card in a SmartEdge 800 chassis:

[local]Redback>show hardware card 5 detail

Slot              : 5                Type              : atm-ds3-12-port 
Serial No         : 7Q0E5060200025   Hardware Rev      : 5               
EEPROM id/ver     : 0x5a/4           Mfg Date          : 01-JUL-2002     
SysFpga rev       : 0x5              SysFpga file rev  : N/A             
LimFpga rev       : 0x3              LimFpga file rev  : 0x3             
IPPA memory       : 256 MB           EPPA memory       : 256 MB          
SARC memory       : 4 MB             
Voltage 1.5V      : 1.509 (+1%)      Voltage 1.8V      : 1.782 (-1%)      
Voltage 2.6V      : 2.612 (-0%)      Voltage 3.3V      : 3.389 (+3%)      
Temperature       : Normal (43 C)    
Card Status       : HW initialized   POD Status        : Success         
ODD Status        : Passed
Fail LED          : Off              Active LED        : On              
Standby LED       : Off              
Chass Entitlement : SE400/SE800      Memory            : Max 
Ports Entitled    : All              Ports Configurable: 4
SAR Image Type    : Default
SAR Image Version : 1.3.4.4
Active Alarms     : NONE

The following example displays detailed output for the fan tray in a SmartEdge 400 chassis:

[local]Redback>show hardware fantray detail

Slot              : N/A              Type              : fan tray        
Serial No         : 0D0A5040300002   Hardware Rev      : 1               
EEPROM id/ver     : 0x5a/4           Mfg Date          : 01-MAY-2003     
Air filter date   : 2005-10
ODD Status        : N/A

The following example shows detailed output for an ATM OC-3e 8-port card in a SmartEdge 800 chassis. Only the first of the eight ports of the card are shown in this example:

[local]Redback>show hardware card 3 detail

Slot              : 3                Type              : atm-oc3e-8-port
Serial No         : 9X60D260721655   Hardware Rev      : 60 
EEPROM id/ver     : 0x5a/4           Mfg Date          : 29-JUN-2007 
SysFpga rev       : 0x7              SysFpga file rev  : N/A 
LimFpga rev       : 0x6              LimFpga file rev  : 0x6 
IPPA memory       : 512 MB            EPPA memory       : 512 MB 
SARC memory       : 16 MB 
Voltage 1.5V      : 1.509 (+1%)      Voltage 1.8V      : 1.802 (+0%) 
Voltage 2.6V      : 2.612 (-0%)      Voltage 3.3V      : 3.413 (+0%) 
Temperature       : NORMAL (32 C)    
Card Status       : HW initialized   POD Status        : Success 
ODD Status        : Not Available
Fail LED          : Off              Active LED        : On 
Standby LED       : Off              
Chass Entitlement : All (0x0)        
Ports Entitled    : All              
SAR Image Type    : vc-fair          
SAR Image Version : 1.7.144.4.0      
Clock Source      : local            
Active Alarms     : NONE

Port              : 1                SFP / Media Type  : OC-3 / IR-1
CLEI code         : VAUIAAWEAA       RedbackApproved   : Yes 
SFP Serial No     : P882GL2          
Wavelength        : 850.00[nm]       
TxPwrMin[dbm]     : -9.50            TxPwrMax[dbm]     : 0.00 
RxPwrMin[dbm]     : -17.01           RxPwrMax[dbm]     : 0.00

The following example shows detailed output for a GE4 20-port card in a SmartEdge 800 or SmartEdge 1200 chassis:

[local]Redback>show hardware card 2 detail

Slot                : 2                 Type                : ge4-20-port
Serial No           : F10R5230800040    Hardware Rev        : 00R
EEPROM id/ver       : 0x5a/4            Mfg Date            : 22-JUN-2008
HubFpga rev         : 0x5               HubFpga file rev    : 0x5
SpiFpga rev         : 0x0               SpiFpga file rev    : N/A
IPPA memory         : N/A               EPPA memory         : N/A
Voltage 1.200V      : 1.201 (+0%)       Voltage 1.200V      : 1.206 (+1%)
Voltage 1.200V      : 1.201 (+0%)       Voltage 1.250V      : 1.245 (-0%)
Temperature         : NORMAL (53 C)
Card Status         : HW initialized    POD Status          : Success
ODD Status          : Not Available
Fail LED            : Off               Active LED          : On
Standby LED         : Invalid
Chass Entitlement   : All (0x0)
Ports Entitled      : All
Active Alarms       : NONE

Port                : 1                 SFP / Media Type    : FX / MM
CLEI code           :                   RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 3577343
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -19.03            TxPwrMax[dbm]       : -14.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -32.22            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : -14.00

Port                : 2                 SFP / Media Type    : SX / MM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAWEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : PCN2YTE
Wavelength          : 850.00[nm] TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -11.74            TxPwrMax[dbm]  : -2.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -20.00            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 1.00

Port                : 3                 SFP / Media Type    : SX / MM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAWEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : PCN2ZK4
Wavelength          : 850.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -11.74            TxPwrMax[dbm]       : -2.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -20.00            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 1.00
Port                : 4                 SFP / Media Type    : SX / MM

CLEI code           : VAUIAAWEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : PCN2YUZ
Wavelength          : 850.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -11.74            TxPwrMax[dbm]       : -2.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -20.00            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 1.00

Port                : 5                 SFP / Media Type    : SX / MM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAWEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : PDC22ZG
Wavelength          : 850.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -11.74            TxPwrMax[dbm]       : -2.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -20.00            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 1.00
Port                : 6                 SFP / Media Type    : SX / MM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAWEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : F721470200E5
Wavelength          : 850.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -9.50             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : -1.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -13.01            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 0.00

Port                : 8                 SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 74VT200402
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -6.31             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 3.69
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -17.26            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 5.74

Port                : 9                 SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           :                   RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 4755100006
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -7.05             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 2.95
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -13.60            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 7.58

Port                : 10                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : P7D28AA
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -9.65             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 4.64
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -17.93            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 6.95

Port                : 11                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 74VT200388
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -6.00             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 4.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -17.06            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 5.85

Port                : 13                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 74VT200492
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -7.21             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 2.79
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -16.46            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 6.51

Port                : 14                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           :                   RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 4756020020
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -5.84             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 4.16
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -13.66            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 7.01

Port                : 15                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 75PT200042
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -8.59             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 1.41
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -16.72            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 6.07

Port                : 16                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 74VT200488
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -6.16             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 3.84
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -16.72            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 6.20

Port                : 17                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 74VT200062
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -6.74             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 3.26
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -16.99            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 6.01

Port                : 18                SFP / Media Type    : LX / SM
CLEI code           : VAUIAAXEAA        RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 74VT200528
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -5.24             TxPwrMax[dbm]       : 4.76
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -17.03            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : 5.87

Port                : 20                SFP / Media Type    : FX / MM
CLEI code           :                   RedbackApproved     : Yes
SFP Serial No       : 3577404
Wavelength          : 1310.00[nm]
TxPwrMin[dbm]       : -19.03            TxPwrMax[dbm]       : -14.00
RxPwrMin[dbm]       : -32.22            RxPwrMax[dbm]       : -14.00

The following example displays detailed output for an SSE card:

[local]Redback>show hardware card 3 detail

Slot                : 3                 Type                : sse
Serial No           : G30EF4208F000W    Hardware Rev        : 0001
EEPROM id/ver       : 0x5a/4            Mfg Date            : 27-OCT-2008
HubFpga rev         : 0x1e              HubFpga file rev    : 0x1e
SpiFpga rev         : 0xa9
Voltage 1.000V      : 1.000 (+0%)       Voltage 1.200V      : 1.198 (-0%)
Voltage 1.800V      : 1.798 (-0%)       Voltage 2.500V      : 2.502 (+0%)
Voltage 3.300V      : 3.300 (+0%)       Voltage 12.000V     : 11.710 (-2%)
Temperature         : NORMAL (53 C)
Card Status         : HW initialized    POD Status          : Success
ODD Status          : Not Available
Fail LED            : Off               Active LED          : On
Standby LED         : Off
Chass Entitlement   : All (0x0)
Active Alarms       : NONE

Disk                : 1                 Type                : sse
Hardware Rev        : 11                Model               : MBB2147RC(FUJITSU)
Spec Capacity       : 147GB             RedbackApproved     : Yes
CLEI code           : SOUCAJWTAA        Serial No           : G4111111111122
Mfg Date            : NOV 2011          Start/Stop count    : 1188 (max. 50000)
Voltage 3.300V      : 3.312 (+0%)       Voltage 5.000V      : 5.010 (+0%)
Voltage 12.000V     : 11.729 (-2%)
Temperature         : NORMAL (25 C)     LED                 : Green
POD Status          : Success           ODD Status          : Not Available
Active Alarms       : NONE

Disk                : 2                 Type                : sse
Hardware Rev        : 1                 Model               : MBB2147RC(FUJITSU)
Spec Capacity       : 147GB             RedbackApproved     : Yes
CLEI code           : SOUCAJWTAA        Serial No           : G4019100865437
Mfg Date            : OCT 2008          Start/Stop count    : 1106 (max. 50000)
Voltage 3.300V      : 3.312 (+0%)       Voltage 5.000V      : 4.998 (-0%)
Voltage 12.000V     : 11.729 (-2%)
Temperature         : NORMAL (24 C)     LED                 : Green
POD Status          : Success           ODD Status          : Not Available
Active Alarms       : NONE


1.4   show history

show history [configuration]

1.4.1   Purpose

Displays the command history for the current session.

1.4.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.4.3   Syntax Description

configuration

Optional. Displays a list of configuration commands entered during the current session. This keyword is available only in exec mode.

1.4.4   Default

Displays a list of commands entered during the current session within the current mode group (exec or configuration).

1.4.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show history command to display the command history for the current session. The history log contains up to 40 commands. To restrict the history to only the configuration commands entered during the session, use the optional configuration keyword, which is only available in exec mode.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

1.4.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show history command (in global configuration mode):

[local]Redback(config)#show history



config

show clock

1.5   show http-redirect circuit

show http-redirect circuit

1.5.1   Purpose

Displays HTTP redirect circuit information.

1.5.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.5.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.5.4   Default

None

1.5.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show http-redirect circuit command to display HTTP redirect circuit information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.5.6   Examples

The following example displays HTTP redirect circuit information:

[local]Redback>show http-redirect circuit



Circuit Handle(internal   User Name / URL     Redir Count    Drop Count

10/6 vlan-id 2            user@local          0              0

                          http://www.redback.com/user@local

1.6   show icmp statistics

show icmp statistics

1.6.1   Purpose

Displays Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) statistics.

1.6.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.6.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.6.4   Default

None

1.6.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show icmp statistics command to display ICMP statistics.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.6.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show icmp statistics command:

[local]Redback>show icmp statistics
icmp:
        6 calls to icmp_error
        0 errors not generated because old message was icmp
        Output histogram:
                destination unreachable: 6
        0 messages with bad code fields
        0 messages < minimum length
        0 bad checksums
        0 messages with bad length
        Input histogram:
                destination unreachable: 6
        0 message responses generated
icmp6:
        0 calls to icmp6_error
        0 errors not generated because old message was icmp6 or so
        0 errors not generated because rate limitation
        Output histogram:
                multicast listener report: 18
                router advertisment: 856
                neighbor solicitation: 4105
                neighbor advertisment: 2065
        0 messages with bad code fields
        0 messages < minimum length
        0 bad checksums
        0 messages with bad length
        Input histogram:
                packet too big: 77900
                router advertisment: 423
                neighbor solicitation: 2075
                neighbor advertisment: 4091
        0 message responses generated
        0 messages with too many ND options

1.7   show igmp bandwidth-profile

show igmp bandwidth-profile [slot/port[:chan-num[:sub-chan-num]]]

1.7.1   Purpose

Displays the configured Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) bandwidth profiles for ports.

1.7.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.7.3   Syntax Description

slot

Optional. Chassis slot number of the card with the port for which IGMP bandwidth profiles are displayed.

port

Optional. Card port number of the port for which IGMP bandwidth profiles are displayed.

chan-num

Optional. Channel number of the DS-3, E3, or E1 channel on the port for which IGMP bandwidth profiles are displayed. Required for a port on a channelized OC-12 or STM-1 card; omitted for a port on a DS-3, clear-channel E3, or channelized E1 card. If omitted, displays IGMP bandwidth profiles for all channels on the port. The range of values is 1 to 12 for a channelized OC-12 port and 1 to 63 for a channelized STM-1 port.

sub-chan-num

Optional. DS-1 channel number on the channelized DS-3 channel, or DS-0 channel group on the channelized E1 channel, for which IGMP bandwidth profiles are displayed. If omitted, displays IGMP bandwidth profiles for all sub-channels in the specified channel.

1.7.4   Default

None

1.7.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp bandwidth-profile command to display the configured IGMP bandwidth profiles for ports.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.7.6   Examples

The following example displays configured IGMP bandwidth profiles for ports:

[local]Redback>show igmp bandwidth-profile
  IGMP bandwidth profile



  slot/port:channel:subchannel      Bandwidth(in Kbps) 

                                    Allowed/Used

  1/9                               100/40

  1/10                              100/0

1.8   show igmp circuit

show igmp circuit

1.8.1   Purpose

Displays circuit-specific information for the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP).

1.8.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.8.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.8.4   Default

None

1.8.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp circuit command to display circuit-specific information for the IGMP.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.8.6   Examples

The following example displays circuit-specific information for the IGMP:

[local]Redback>show igmp circuit
  Number of circuits: 4

    1/9:1023:63/1/1/5, fxp1, Up, recv permit/send permit/unsol permit

    1/11:1023:63/1/1/13, fxp2, Up, recv permit/send permit/unsol permit

    12/1:1:63/1/2/18, fxp3, Up, recv permit/send permit/unsol permit

    12/1:1:63/1/2/19, fxp3, Up, recv permit/send permit/unsol permit

1.9   show igmp group

show igmp group [group-addr] [count | detail | subscriber sub-name [detail]]

1.9.1   Purpose

Displays Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)-connected group membership information.

1.9.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.9.3   Syntax Description

group-addr

Optional. IP address of the IGMP group.

count

Optional. Displays IGMP group membership count.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed group membership information, including membership tracking and IGMP Version 3 (IGMPv3) source lists.

subscriber sub-name

Optional. Subscriber name. Displays groups joined by the specified subscriber.

1.9.4   Default

None

1.9.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp group command to display IGMP-connected group membership information.

Use the group-addr argument to display IGMP-connected group membership information for only the specified group.

Use the detail keyword to enable the explicit tracking of IGMP group membership for all hosts in a multiaccess network. Group membership information is displayed for hosts running IGMP Version 3 (IGMPv2), and group membership and source list information is displayed for hosts running IGMPv3.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.9.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show igmp group command:

[local]Redback>show igmp group
IGMP Connected Group Membership



FLAGS: C - Connected, L - Local



Group Address  Interface  Uptime    Expires  Last Reporter  Flags  Circuit

224.121.121.1  fe410      00:01:08  never    10.100.1.2     L      4/10:2047:31/1/1/20

224.121.121.1  fe411      00:01:08  never    11.1.1.2       L      4/11:2047:31/1/1/22

224.121.121.1  fe412      00:01:08  never    12.1.1.2       L      4/12:2047:31/1/1/24

224.121.121.1  fe46       00:01:08  never    6.1.1.2        L      4/6:2047:31/1/1/12

224.121.121.1  fe47       00:01:08  never    7.1.1.2        L      4/7:2047:31/1/1/14

224.121.121.1  fe48       00:01:08  never    8.1.1.2        L      4/8:2047:31/1/1/16

224.121.121.1  fe49       00:01:08  never    9.1.1.2        L      4/9:2047:31/1/1/18

224.131.1.1    fxp8       00:00:04  00:04:15 81.1.1.2       C      12/8:2047:31/1/1/35

224.131.1.2    fxp8       00:00:04  00:04:15 81.1.1.2       C      12/8:2047:31/1/1/35

224.131.1.3    fxp8       00:00:04  00:04:15 81.1.1.2       C      12/8:2047:31/1/1/35

224.131.1.4    fxp8       00:00:04  00:04:15 81.1.1.2       C      12/8:2047:31/1/1/35

The following example shows the host running IGMPv3, 11.3.1.2, is interested in receiving traffic for group 225.1.1.1 from sources 192.18.1.1 and 192.18.1.2.. Information about both sources is included in IGMPv3 reports:

[local]Redback>show igmp group detail


Group             : 225.1.1.1

  Interface       : ----

  Circuit         : 255/22:1:26/1/2/4

  Uptime          : 00:01:08

  Expires         : 00:04:19

  Last reporter   : 11.3.1.2

  Running version : v3

  Host Count      : 0

  Filter mode     : Include

  Source list      :

    Source Address  Uptime     Expires    Forwarding  Reporter

 

   Sources in INCLUDE list:

   192.18.1.1      00:00:00   00:03:12   Yes          11.3.1.2

   193.18.1.2      00:00:00   00:03      Yes          11.3.1.2


   

The following example shows that the hosts running IGMPv3 (11.3.1.2 and 100.3.5.2) are interested in receiving traffic for group 225.1.1.1 from the source 192.18.1.1. In this example, source 192.18.1.1 is included in IGMPv3 reports, while source 193.18.1.2 is excluded in the IGMPv3 reports.

[local]Redback>show igmp group detail


Group             : 225.1.1.1

  Interface       : ----

  Circuit         : 255/22:1:26/1/2/4

  Uptime          : 00:00:53

  Expires         : 00:03:57

  Last reporter   : 100.3.5.2

  Running version : v3

  Host Count      : 0

  Filter mode     : Exclude

  Source list      :

    Source Address  Uptime     Expires    Forwarding  Reporter

 

   Sources in INCLUDE list:

   192.18.1.1      00:00:03   00:04:17   Yes          11.3.1.2

 

   Sources in EXCLUDE list:

    193.18.1.2      00:00:53   stopped    No           100.3.5.2


1.10   show igmp group-bandwidth

show igmp group-bandwidth [group-addr]

1.10.1   Purpose

Displays bandwidth recommendations for multicast groups.

1.10.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.10.3   Syntax Description

group-addr

Optional. IP address of the multicast group for which information is to be displayed.

1.10.4   Default

None

1.10.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp group-bandwidth command to display bandwidth recommendations for multicast groups.

Specifying the group-addr argument displays bandwidth recommendations only for the specified group.

Use the igmp group-bandwidth command (in context configuration mode) to configure bandwidth recommendations for multicast groups.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.10.6   Examples

The following example displays bandwidth recommendations for multicast groups:

[local]Redback>show igmp group-bandwidth
  IGMP bandwidth mapping

  Group prefix          Bandwidth

                        (in Kbps)

  224.1.1.0/24          20

  224.121.121.0/24      100

1.11   show igmp interface

show igmp interface [if-name] [brief]

1.11.1   Purpose

Displays Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) interface information.

1.11.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.11.3   Syntax Description

if-name

Optional. Name of the IGMP interface.

brief

Optional. Displays minimal IGMP interface information.

1.11.4   Default

None

1.11.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp interface command to display IGMP interface information.

Use the if-name argument to display information for only the specified IGMP interface.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.11.6   Examples

The following example displays information for the IGMP interface, fxp1:

[local]Redback>show igmp interface fxp1
Interface fxp1

  IP addrss is 103.1.1.2

  Multicast routing is enabled on the interface

  IGMP is enabled on the interface

  IGMP interface status is up

  IGMP configured version is 2

  IGMP running version is 2

  IGMP query interval is 125 seconds

  IGMP query response interval is 10 seconds

  IGMP last member query interval is 1000 milli-seconds

  Multicast designated router (DR) is 103.1.1.2 (this system)

  IGMP querier is 103.1.1.1 

  IGMP robust value is 2

  Number of ccts bound: 1 <----- new 

  No multicast groups joined

1.12   show igmp service-profile

show igmp service-profile {prof-name [if-name] | circuit [if-name]}

1.12.1   Purpose

Displays service profile information, or bandwidth usage for all circuits.

1.12.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.12.3   Syntax Description

prof-name

Service profile name. Specifies the service profile for which information is to be displayed.

if-name

Optional. Displays information only for the specified interface.

circuit

Displays bandwidth usage for all circuits.

1.12.4   Default

None

1.12.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp service-profile command to display service profile information, or bandwidth usage for all circuits.

Use the optional if-name argument to display information only for the specified interface.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.12.6   Examples

The following example displays information about the current state of the service profile, servpro1, and all interfaces that are members of that service profile:

[local]Redback>show igmp service-profile servpro1
Service Profile : servpro1

Bandwidth used: 80982

Interface         Bandwidth      Groups         used (kbps)      Joined

fxp1              0              0

fxp2              80982          80982

The following example displays information for service profile, profile1, on the fxp4 interface:

[local]Redback>show igmp profile servpro2 fxp4
Service Profile : servpro2

 Circuit (Interface) : 10/4:1023:63/1/1/8 (fxp4)

  Bandwidth used (kbps)/port percent : 0/0%

  Groups (Max Allowed/Joined/Sticky) : 0/0/0

  Groups dropped

   Max count exceeded : 0

   Bandwidth exceeded : 30

   No bandwidth : 0

The following example displays bandwidth usage information for the fxp4 IGMP interface:

[local]Redback>show igmp profile circuit fxp4
 Circuit (Interface) : 10/4:1023:63/1/1/8 (fxp4)

  Bandwidth used (kbps)/port percent : 0/0%

  Groups (Max Allowed/Joined/Sticky) : 0/0/0

  Groups dropped

   Max count exceeded : 0

   Bandwidth exceeded : 30

   No bandwidth : 0

1.13   show igmp snooping access-group name

show igmp snooping access-group name group-name [detail]

1.13.1   Purpose

Displays information about a specified access list that is associated with an Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping instance.

1.13.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.13.3   Syntax Description

group-name

Identifies an access group that is associated with an IGMP snooping instance.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information for the specified access group.

1.13.4   Default

None

1.13.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp snooping access-group command to display information about a specified access list that is associated with an IGMP snooping instance.

1.13.6   Examples

The following example displays information for an access list called acl1:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping access-group name acl1

access list acl1

Hit Count:         0  seq 10    deny  host 234.1.2.3

Hit Count:        16  seq 20  permit  any

1.14   show igmp snooping bridge

show igmp snooping bridge [bridge-name] [detail]

1.14.1   Purpose

Displays Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping information for a specific bridge interface or all bridge interfaces that are currently configured on the router.

1.14.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.14.3   Syntax Description

bridge-name

Identifies an IGMP snooping bridge interface.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information for the specified IGMP snooping bridge.

1.14.4   Default

Displays summary IGMP snooping information for all bridge interfaces that are currently configured on the router.

1.14.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp snooping bridge command to display IGMP snooping information for a specific bridge interface or all bridge interfaces that are currently configured on the router.

1.14.6   Examples

The following example displays IGMP snooping information for all bridge interfaces currently configured on the router:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping bridge

IGMP Snooping:

Version Cct   Snooping

Bridge                        Cfg/Run Count Mode

----------------------------------------------------------

b2                              2/2   0     snooping

br1                             2/2   0     passive proxy  snooping

igmp-blue-bridge                2/2   7     snooping

test                            3/3   4     snooping

The following example displays IGMP snooping information for a bridge interface called igmp-blue-bridge:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping bridge igmp-blue-bridge


IGMP Snooping:

Version Cct   Snooping

Bridge                        Cfg/Run Count Mode

----------------------------------------------------------

igmp-blue-bridge                2/2   7     snooping

The following example displays detailed IGMP snooping information for the bridge interface called igmp-blue-bridge:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping bridge igmp-blue-bridge detail

IGMP Snooping:

Bridge: igmp-blue-bridge (mfib_id 0x20000001)  Version Cfg/Run: 2/2

Snooping: enabled     Proxy Mode: disabled    Robust:   2

Qry Intvl: 125s   Qry Resp Intvl: 10s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter count: 0    (*, G) count:  0    (S, G) count:  0

Packets sent/received/error:       0/0/0

Queries sent/received/error:       0/1/0

Reports sent/received/error:       0/0/0

 Leaves  sent/received/error:       0/0/0

1.15   show igmp snooping circuit

show igmp snooping circuit [slot/port [vlan begin-range : end-range]] [counter | group | detail]

1.15.1   Purpose

Displays IGMP snooping-related information about circuits that are bound to bridge interfaces that have IGMP snooping enabled.

1.15.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.15.3   Syntax Description

slot/port

Optional. Specifies a particular circuit whose IGMP snooping information you want to display.


Replace the slot argument with the chassis slot number that hosts the circuit whose IGMP snooping output you want to display.


Replace the port argument with the number that identifies the port whose IGMP snooping output you want to display.


(1)

vlan begin-range : end-range

Optional. Displays (*,G) and (S,G) information for a specified range of IGMP snooping VLAN circuits.

counter

Optional. Displays IGMP counters for a specified IGMP snooping circuit or all IGMP snooping circuits currently configured on the router.

group

Optional. Displays detailed group membership information for a specified IGMP snooping circuit or all IGMP snooping circuits currently configured on the router.

detail

Optional. Displays IGMP counters and detailed group membership information for a specified IGMP snooping circuit or all IGMP snooping circuits currently configured on the router.

(1)  To see a list of all IGMP snooping circuits currently configured on the router, use the show igmp snooping circuit command without any of the optional keywords or arguments.


1.15.4   Default

Displays a list of all circuits that are bound to bridge interfaces that have IGMP snooping enabled.

1.15.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp snooping circuit command to display IGMP snooping-related information about circuits that are bound to bridge interfaces that have IGMP snooping enabled.

1.15.6   Examples

The following example displays a list of all circuits that are bound to bridges that have IGMP snooping enabled:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping circuit


Circuit                       Bridge              Profile             Flags

-----------------------------------------------------------------------


1/1:1023:63/1/1/4             igmp-test-bridge

4/3:1023:63/1/2/16            igmp-test-bridge

4/3:1023:63/1/2/17            igmp-test-bridge    mrouter

4/3:1023:63/1/2/18            igmp-test-bridge    bar

4/3:1023:63/1/2/19            igmp-test-bridge    bar

4/3:1023:63/1/2/20            igmp-test-bridge

4/3:1023:63/1/2/21            igmp-test-bridge

4/3:1023:63/1/2/22            test

4/3:1023:63/1/2/23            test

4/3:1023:63/1/2/24            test

4/3:1023:63/1/2/25            test                mrouter

The following example displays IGMP snooping information for the circuit 1 on the card that is installed in slot 1 of the router:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping circuit 1/1

Circuit                       Bridge              Profile             Flags

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

1/1:1023:63/1/1/4             igmp-test-bridge

The following example displays IGMP counters and detailed group membership information for the IGMP snooping circuit 1 on the card installed in slot 1 of the router:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping circuit 1/1 detail


IGMP Snooping Cct:

Circuit: 1/1:1023:63/1/1/4

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      down

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

IGMP Snooping reports received/error:       0/0

IGMP Snooping queries received/error:       0/0

IGMP Snooping leaves received/error:        0/0

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

The following example displays IGMP counters for the IGMP snooping circuit 1 on the card installed in slot 1 of the router:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping circuit 1/1 counter


IGMP Snooping Cct:

Circuit: 1/1:1023:63/1/1/4

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      down

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

IGMP Snooping reports received/error:       0/0

IGMP Snooping queries received/error:       0/0

IGMP Snooping leaves received/error:        0/0

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

The following example displays detailed group membership information for the IGMP snooping circuit 4 on the card installed in slot 3 of the router:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping circuit 4/3 group


IGMP Snooping Cct:

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/16

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/17

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: static

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/18

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Flags: S - static

Groups                             State           Uptime/Expires   Flags

(*, 233.1.1.1)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 234.1.1.3)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.5)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.2)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.6)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.4)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/19

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Flags: S - static

Groups                             State           Uptime/Expires   Flags

(*, 233.1.1.1)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 234.1.1.3)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.5)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.2)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.6)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

(*, 233.1.1.4)                     FORWARD       5d22h   /00:00:00    S

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/20

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/21

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  2/2   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/22

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  3/3   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/23

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  3/3   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/24

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  3/3   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: enabled   Attached: no

Circuit: 4/3:1023:63/1/2/25

Snooping: enabled     Version Cfg/Run:  3/3   Cct state:      up

Robust: 2    Qry Intvl: 125s   Last Member Qry Intvl: 1000ms

Mrouter Monitoring: static

1.16   show igmp snooping group

show igmp snooping group [group-address [source source-address]] bridge bridge-name [count]

1.16.1   Purpose

Displays a per-bridge list of IGMP groups and their associated circuits.

1.16.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.16.3   Syntax Description

group-address

Optional. IP address of the group whose configuration information you want to display.

source source-address

Optional. Source for a multicast group. Replace the argument with the IP address of a source as desired.

bridge bridge-name

IGMP snooping bridge interface.

count

Optional. Displays the number of circuits currently subscribed to the specified bridge group.

1.16.4   Default

None

1.16.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp snooping group command to display a per-bridge list of IGMP groups and their associated circuits.

1.16.6   Examples

The following example displays information about the multicast state of the IGMP snooping bridge called igmp-green-bridge:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping group bridge igmp-green-bridge


IGMP Snooping Groups on Bridge:(*, 234.1.1.3), 0x280002

4/3:1023:63/1/2/17, MROUTER

4/3:1023:63/1/2/18, STATIC

4/3:1023:63/1/2/19, STATIC

(*, 233.1.1.2), 0x280005

4/3:1023:63/1/2/17, MROUTER

4/3:1023:63/1/2/18, STATIC

4/3:1023:63/1/2/19, STATIC

(*, 233.1.1.1), 0x280001

4/3:1023:63/1/2/17, MROUTER

4/3:1023:63/1/2/18, STATIC

4/3:1023:63/1/2/19, STATIC

(*, 233.1.1.6), 0x280006

4/3:1023:63/1/2/17, MROUTER

4/3:1023:63/1/2/18, STATIC

4/3:1023:63/1/2/19, STATIC

(*, 233.1.1.5), 0x280004

4/3:1023:63/1/2/17, MROUTER

  4/3:1023:63/1/2/18, STATIC

  4/3:1023:63/1/2/19, STATIC

(*, 233.1.1.4), 0x280003

  4/3:1023:63/1/2/17, MROUTER

  4/3:1023:63/1/2/18, STATIC, DYNAMIC

  4/3:1023:63/1/2/19, STATIC

The following example displays the number of circuits currently subscribed to the bridge group called igmp-green-bridge:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping group bridge igmp-green-bridge count

IGMP Snooping Groups on Bridge:

Group                                 Packets/Bytes     Number of circuits

(*, 234.1.1.3)                              0/0          3

(*, 233.1.1.2)                              0/0          3

(*, 233.1.1.1)                              0/0          3

(*, 233.1.1.6)                              0/0          3

(*, 233.1.1.5)                              0/0          3

(*, 233.1.1.4)                              0/0          3

1.17   show igmp snooping mrouter

show igmp snooping mrouter [bridge bridge-name]

1.17.1   Purpose

Displays a per-bridge list of circuits that are facing multicast routers.

1.17.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.17.3   Syntax Description

bridge bridge-name

IGMP snooping bridge interface.

1.17.4   Default

None

1.17.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp snooping mrouter command to display a per-bridge list of circuits that are facing multicast routers.

Enter the show igmp snooping mrouter command without the optional bridge bridge-name construct to display a list of all circuits that are currently facing multicast routers. Include the optional bridge bridge-name construct in the show igmp snooping mrouter command to display a list of multicast router-facing circuits that are bound to a specific bridge.

Note:  
The show igmp snooping mrouter command displays mrouter information only for those bridges that are configured in the current context. To display mrouter information for bridges that are configured in a different context, use the context command in global configuration mode to change to the appropriate context and before entering the show igmp snooping mrouter command.

1.17.6   Examples

The following example displays mrouter information all bridges configured in the current context:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping mrouter

FLAGS: S - Static

Bridge Name         Circuit Handle                Timeout   Flags

-----------------------------------------------------------------

igmp-test-bridge    4/3:1023:63/1/2/17                        S

test                4/3:1023:63/1/2/25                        S

The following example displays mrouter information for a bridge called igmp-red-bridge:

[local]Redback#show igmp snooping mrouter bridge igmp-red-bridge

FLAGS: S - Static

Bridge Name         Circuit Handle                Timeout   Flags

-----------------------------------------------------------------

igmp-red-bridge    4/3:1023:63/1/2/17                        S

1.18   show igmp traffic

show igmp traffic

1.18.1   Purpose

Displays Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) traffic statistics.

1.18.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.18.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.18.4   Default

None

1.18.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show igmp traffic command to display IGMP traffic statistics.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.18.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show igmp traffic command:

[local]Redback>show igmp traffic
IGMP statistics:

 Sent:  Total:  61       Query: 57          Report: 3        Leave: 1

 Rcvd:  Total:  25       Query: 15          Report: 8        Leave: 2

 Error: Total:  0        Query: 0           Report: 0        Cksum: 0

        System: 0        Tooshort: 0        Others: 0

1.19   show inverse-arp counters

show inverse-arp counters [all-contexts] [[slot/port] [vpi vpi [vci vci]]] [sum]

1.19.1   Purpose

Displays inverse Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) counters.

1.19.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.19.3   Syntax Description

all-contexts

Optional. Displays inverse ARP counters for all contexts. This option is available only if you are a local administrator. If omitted, displays inverse ARP counters for the current context only.

slot

Optional. Chassis slot number. If omitted, displays inverse ARP counters for all ports on all traffic cards.

port

Optional. Traffic card port number; required when the slot argument is included.

vpi vpi

Optional. Virtual path identifier (VPI) for the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) permanent virtual circuit (PVC) for which to display inverse ARP counters. The range of values is 0 to 255. If omitted, displays counters for all virtual paths (VPs) on the port.

vci vci

Optional. Virtual circuit identifier (VCI) for the ATM PVC for which to display inverse ARP counters. The range of values is 1 to 65,535. If omitted, displays counters for all ATM PVCs on the VP.

sum

Optional. Displays summary information for inverse ARP counters.

1.19.4   Default

When entered without any optional syntax, the show inverse-arp counters command displays inverse ARP counters for all ports on all traffic cards for the current context only.

1.19.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show inverse-arp counters command to display inverse ARP counters. Counters include total counts for received, dropped, and sent packets. Local administrators have privileges that are not available to other administrators.

Note:  
The SmartEdge 100 router limits the value of the slot argument to 2.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.19.6   Examples

The following example displays inverse ARP counters for ATM PVCs configured on port 1 on the traffic card in slot 4 in the current context:

[local]Redback>show inverse-arp counters 4/1



current time: Mon Jun  6 01:31:59 2005

                      Pkts             Pkts             Pkts

  Slot/Port VPI VCI   Received         Replied          Dropped

   4/1      100 32    306              0                306



Totals

  Packets Rcvd:                    306 Packets Replied:0

  Rcv Packets Dropped:             306

1.20   show ip access-list

show ip access-list [{[summary] [acl-name] | first-match acl-name [protocol] {src-addr [port port]} [dest-addr [port port] [dscp dscp-value] [established | setup | invalid-tcp-flags ] [length length] [precedence prec-value] [tos tos-value] [[fragments] | [ip-options]]}]

1.20.1   Purpose

Displays the status of configured IP access control lists (ACLs).

1.20.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.20.3   Syntax Description

summary

Optional. Excludes the ACL statements from the display. Optionally, you can follow this keyword with the acl-name argument, naming a particular ACL for which you want summary information displayed.

acl-name

Optional. Name of the ACL for which you want information displayed. To display summary information about a specific list, you must enter the summary keyword first, followed by the acl-name argument.

first-match acl-name

Optional. Name of the ACL for which you want to find the first statement matched by the criteria that follows the first-match acl-name construct.

protocol

Optional. Number indicating a protocol as specified in RFC 1700, Assigned Numbers. The range of values is 0 to 255. In place of the protocol argument, you can use any of the following keywords:


  • ahp—Specifies the Authentication Header Protocol.

  • esp—Specifies the encapsulation security payload.

  • gre—Specifies Generic Routing Encapsulation.

  • host—Specifies the host source address.

  • icmp—Specifies the Internet Control Message Protocol.

  • igmp—Specifies the Internet Group Management Protocol.

  • ip—Uses any IP protocol.

  • ipinip—Specifies IP-in-IP tunneling.

  • ospf—Specifies the Open Shortest Path First protocol.

  • pcp—Specifies the Payload Compression Protocol.

  • pim—Specifies Protocol Independent Multicast.

  • tcp—Specifies the Transmission Control Protocol.

  • udp—Specifies the User Datagram Protocol.

src-addr

Source address to be included in the criteria for a match. An IP address in the form A.B.C.D.

port port

Optional. TCP or UDP port to be considered a match for either the source or destination IP address. This construct is only available if you specified TCP or UDP as the protocol. The range of values is 1 to 65,535. You can also substitute a keyword for the port argument as listed in Table 6 and Table 7 in the “Usage Guidelines” section for this command.

dest-addr

Optional. Destination address to be included in the criteria for a match. An IP address in the form A.B.C.D.

dscp dscp-value

Optional. Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) to be included in the criteria for a match. The range of values is 0 to 63. You can also substitute a keyword for the dscp-value argument as listed in Table 8 in the “Usage Guidelines” section for this command.

established

Optional. Specifies that only established connections are to be matched. This keyword is only available if you specify tcp for the protocol argument.

invalid-tcp-flags

Optional. Specifies that TCP packets with flag combinations other than the following are a match:


  • SYN

  • SYN+ACK

  • ACK

  • PSH+ACK

  • URG+ACK

  • URG+PSH+ACK

  • FIN

  • FIN+ACK

  • RST

  • RST+ACK


Only the lower-order 6 bits (for example, FIN, SYN, RST, PSH, ACK, and URG) in the TCP Flags field are considered for validation. The higher order 6-bits (ECN bits defined by RFC 3168, The Addition of Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) to IP, and the reserved bits) are ignored.


This keyword is only available if you specify tcp for the protocol argument.

setup

Optional. Specifies that TCP packets with SYN set and ACK not set in the Flags field are a match.


This keyword is only available if you specify tcp for the protocol argument.

length length

Packet length. The length of the network-layer packet, beginning with the IP header. The range of values is 20 to 65,535.

precedence prec-value

Optional. Precedence value of packets to be included in the criteria for a match. The range of values is 0 to 7, with 7 being the highest precedence. In place of the prec-value argument, you can enter any of the following keywords:


  • routine—Specifies routine precedence (value = 0).

  • priority—Specifies priority precedence (value = 1).

  • immediate—Specifies immediate precedence (value = 2).

  • flash—Specifies flash precedence (value = 3).

  • flash-override—Specifies flash override precedence (value = 4).

  • critical—Specifies critical precedence (value = 5).

  • internet—Specifies internetwork control precedence (value = 6).

  • network—Specifies network control precedence (value = 7).

tos tos-value

Optional. Type of service (ToS) to be included in the criteria for a match. The range of values is 0 to 15. In place of the tos-value argument, you can enter any of the following keywords:


  • max-reliability—Specifies maximum reliable ToS (value = 2).

  • max-throughput—Specifies maximum throughput ToS (value = 4).

  • min-delay—Specifies minimum delay ToS (value = 8).

  • min-monetary-cost—Specifies minimum monetary cost ToS (value = 1).

  • normal—Specifies normal ToS (value = 0).


To specify both a precedence and a ToS, you must enter the precedence prec-value construct first, followed by the tos tos-value construct.

1.20.4   Default

When entered without any optional syntax, the show ip access-list command displays information for all IP ACLs in the context, including the statements in each list.

1.20.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip access-list command to display the status of configured IP ACLs.

Use the first-match acl-name construct to display the first statement in the ACL that is matched by the criteria that follows the first-match acl-name construct.

Table 6 lists the valid keyword substitutions for the port argument when the argument is used to specify a TCP port.

Table 6    Valid Keyword Substitutions for the port Argument (TCP Port)

Keyword

Definition

Corresponding Port Number

bgp

Border Gateway Protocol

179

chargen

Character generator

19

cmd

Remote commands (rcmd)

514

daytime

Daytime

13

discard

Discard

9

domain

Domain Name System

53

echo

Echo

7

exec

Exec (rsh)

512

finger

Finger

79

ftp

File Transfer Protocol

21

ftp-data

FTP data connections (used infrequently)

20

gopher

Gopher

70

hostname

Network interface card (NIC) hostname server

101

ident

Identification protocol

113

irc

Internet Relay Chat

194

klogin

Kerberos login

543

kshell

Kerberos Shell

544

login

Login (rlogin)

513

lpd

Printer service

515

nntp

Network News Transport Protocol

119

pim-auto-rp

Protocol Independent Multicast Auto-RP

496

pop2

Post Office Protocol Version 2

109

pop3

Post Office Protocol Version 3

110

shell

Remote Command Shell

514

smtp

Simple Mail Transport Protocol

25

ssh

Secure Shell

22

sunrpc

Sun Remote Procedure Call

111

syslog

Syslog

514

tacacs

Terminal Access Controller Access Control System

49

talk

Talk

517

telnet

Telnet

23

time

Time

37

uucp

Unix-to-Unix Copy Program

540

whois

Nickname

43

www

World Wide Web (HTTP)

80

Table 7 lists the valid keyword substitutions for the port argument when the argument is used to specify a UDP port.

Table 7    Valid port Argument Keyword Substitution Values for UDP Ports

Keyword

Definition

Corresponding Port Number

biff

Biff (Mail Notification, Comsat)

512

bootpc

Bootstrap Protocol client

68

bootps

Bootstrap Protocol server

67

discard

Discard

9

dnsix

DNSIX Security Protocol Auditing

195

domain

Domain Name System

53

echo

Echo

7

isakmp

Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP)

500

mobile-ip

Mobile IP registration

434

nameserver

IEN116 Name Service (obsolete)

42

netbios-dgm

NetBIOS Datagram Service

138

netbios-ns

NetBIOS Name Service

137

netbios-ss

NetBIOS Session Service

139

ntp

Network Time Protocol

123

pim-auto-rp

Protocol Independent Multicast Auto-RP

496

rip

Router Information Protocol (router, in.routed)

520

snmp

Simple Network Management Protocol

161

snmptrap

SNMP traps

162

sunrpc

Sun Remote Procedure Call

111

syslog

System logger

514

tacacs

Terminal Access Controller Access Control System

49

talk

Talk

517

tftp

Trivial File Transfer Protocol

69

time

Time

37

who

Who Service (rwho)

513

xdmcp

X Display Manager Control Protocol

177

Table 8 lists the valid keyword substitutions for the dscp-value argument.

Table 8    Valid Keyword Substitutions for the dscp-value Argument

Keyword

Definition

af11

Assured Forwarding—Class 1/Drop Precedence 1

af12

Assured Forwarding—Class 1/Drop Precedence 2

af13

Assured Forwarding—Class 1/Drop Precedence 3

af21

Assured Forwarding—Class 2/Drop Precedence 1

af22

Assured Forwarding—Class 2/Drop Precedence 2

af23

Assured Forwarding—Class 2/Drop Precedence 3

af31

Assured Forwarding—Class 3/Drop Precedence 1

af32

Assured Forwarding—Class 3/Drop Precedence 2

af33

Assured Forwarding—Class 3/Drop Precedence 3

af41

Assured Forwarding—Class 4/Drop Precedence 1

af42

Assured Forwarding—Class 4/Drop Precedence 2

af43

Assured Forwarding—Class 4/Drop Precedence 3

cs0

Class Selector 0

cs1

Class Selector 1

cs2

Class Selector 2

cs3

Class Selector 3

cs4

Class Selector 4

cs5

Class Selector 5

cs6

Class Selector 6

cs7

Class Selector 7

df

Default Forwarding (same as cs0)

ef

Expedited Forwarding

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.20.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip access-list command:

[local]Redback>show ip access-list



ip access-list client1_list:

 count: 1, sequences: 10 - 10, client count: 0

 modified: 01:36:56 (hh:mm:ss) ago

 counting: disabled, logging: disabled

 seq 10 permit ip any any

ip access-list test_list:

 count: 4, sequences: 10 - 40, client count: 0

 modified: 01:36:56 (hh:mm:ss) ago

 counting: disabled, logging: disabled

 description: test list

  seq 10 permit ip any any

  seq 20 deny ip any any

  seq 30 permit ip any any

  seq 40 permit ip any any

ip access-list test2_list:

 count: 0, sequences: 0 - 0, client count: 0

 modified: 01:36:56 (hh:mm:ss) ago

 counting: disabled, logging: disabled

 description: test 2 list

total ip access lists: 3 


The following example displays the statements and conditions configured for the policy ACL, ipacl_cond:

[local]Redback>show ip access-list ipacl_cond



ip access-list ipacl_cond:

  count: 2, sequences: 10 - 20, client count: 1

  modified: 00:10:21 (hh:mm:ss) ago, version: 14

   condition 100 time-range

    absolute start 2005:01:01:01:00 end 2005:01:01:01:01 deny

   seq 10 permit tcp any any eq www condition 100

   seq 20 deny ip any any

1.21   show ip host

show ip host

1.21.1   Purpose

Displays all static hostname-to-IP Version 4 (IPv4) address mappings stored in the local host table for the current context.

1.21.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.21.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.21.4   Default

None

1.21.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip host command to display all static hostname-to-IPv4 address mappings stored in the local host table for the current context.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.21.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip host command:

[local]Redback>show ip host



Host Name                IP Address       Type        TTL

host1                    172.2.3.1        static      0

host2                    172.2.3.2        static      0

host3                    172.2.3.3        static      0

1.22   show ip interface

show ip interface [if-name | all-context | brief | xcrp]

1.22.1   Purpose

Displays information about interfaces, including the interface bound to the Ethernet management port on the controller card.

1.22.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.22.3   Syntax Description

if-name

Optional. Name of the interface to be displayed.

all-context

Optional. Displays interface information for all contexts.

brief

Optional. Displays the name, IP address, and other information (in brief) for all configured interfaces in the current context.

xcrp

Optional. Displays incoming and outgoing packets, errors, and collisions for the interface to which the Ethernet management port on the controller cards is bound, including incoming and outgoing packets, errors, dropped bytes, and collisions.

1.22.4   Default

Displays detailed information for all configured interfaces.

1.22.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip interface command to display information about all interfaces, including those on the controller card. Use this command without optional syntax to display detailed information on all configured interfaces. This command is also related to the ip tcp mss command.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

An interface can be in any of the following states:

1.22.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip interface command with the brief keyword:

[local]Redback>show ip interface brief

Mon Jun 27 06:38:05 2005

Name              Address                  MTU    State      Bindings

fe13/3            3.2.13.3/16              1500   Up         ethernet 13/3

fe13/4            4.2.13.4/16              1500   Up         ethernet 13/4

5/1               10.13.49.166/24          1500   Up         ethernet 5/1

12/1              10.1.1.1/16              0      UnBound

un1               (Un-numbered)            0      UnBound

lo1               100.1.1.1/16             1500   Up         (Loopback)

The following example displays information for the mss-test interface:

[local]Redback#show ip interface mss-test



Intf name:       mss2

Intf state:      Up                        MTU:              800

IP address:      1.1.2.1                   Prefix len:       24

Resoln type:     Arp                       ARP timeout:      3600

ARP proxy:       Disabled                  ARP secured:      Disabled

TCP MSS In:      replace                   size:           1024

TCP MSS Out:     replace                   size:           1024

Number of Bound Circuits (incl. dynamic) = 1

Bindings:  (Total Bound Circuits 1)

Encapsulation    Circuit

ethernet         2/2

The following example displays packet information for the interface to which the Ethernet management port is bound:

[local]Redback>show ip interface xcrp
Name  Mtu    Network            Address              Ipkts      Opkts     Colls

                                                     Ierrs      Oerrs     Drops

fxp0  1500   <Link>             00:30:88:00:03:6f    62716      22871         0

                                                         2          0         0

fxp0  1500   10.13.49/24        10.13.49.166         62716      22871         0

                                                         2          0         0

ipc0  8192   <Link>                                  32078      26862         0

                                                         0          0         0

ipc0  8192   127                127.0.2.5            32078      26862         0

                                                         0          0         0

lo0   33228  <Link>                                      0          0         0

                                                         0          0         0

lo0   33228  127                127.0.0.1                0          0         0

                                                         0          0         0

xcrp  65535  <Link>                                      0          0         0

                                                         0          0         0

lc12  65535  <Link>                                   2461       2452         0

                                                         0          0         0

The following example displays byte information for the interface to which the Ethernet management port is bound:

[local]Redback>show ip interface xcrp bytes 
Name  Mtu    Network            Address                 Ibytes       Obytes

fxp0  1500   <Link>             00:30:88:00:03:6f     55787738       2053859

fxp0  1500   10.13.49/24        10.13.49.166          55787738       2053859

ipc0  8192   <Link>                                 3665494016      77265152

ipc0  8192   127                127.0.2.5           3665494016      77265152

lo0   33228  <Link>                                          0             0

lo0   33228  127                12.0.0.1                     0             0

xcrp  65535  <Link>                                          0             0

lc12  65535  <Link>                                          0             0

1.23   show ip mroute

show ip mroute [group-addr [src-addr]] [count]

1.23.1   Purpose

Displays the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) routing table.

1.23.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.23.3   Syntax Description

group-addr

Optional. IP address of the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) group.

src-addr

Optional. IP address of the multicast source.

count

Optional. Displays statistics about the group and source, including number of packets, packets per second, average packet size, and bits per second.

1.23.4   Default

None

1.23.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip mroute command to display the PIM routing table.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.23.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip mroute command:

[local]Redback>show ip mroute 224.131.1.1
IP Multicast Routing Table

Flags: D - Dense, S - Sparse, C(c) - Connected(RPF), P - Pruned,

      L(l) - Local(RPF), R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,

      T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP learned, H - Static,

      AW - Assert Winner, AL - Assert Loser  . - No forwarding activity

Timers: Uptime/Expires

Interface state: Interface, State, Timers, flags

Table version: 11137



(*, 224.131.1.1), 00:01:33/00:01:56, RP: 10.200.1.1, Flags: SC

  Incoming interface: fxp1, RPF neighbor: 13.1.1.1, Next join: 00:00:49

  Incoming circuit: 12/1:2047:31/1/1/28

  Outgoing interface list: 

    fxp8, 12/8:2047:31/1/1/35, Forward, 00:01:33/00:01:56



(61.1.1.2, 224.131.1.1), 00:00:11/00:03:18, Flags: SC

  Incoming interface: fxp2, RPF neighbor: 104.1.1.1

  Incoming circuit: 12/2:2047:31/1/1/6

  Outgoing interface list: 

    fxp8, 12/8:2047:31/1/1/35, Forward, 00:00:11/00:01:56

1.24   show ip pool

show ip pool [name] [context summary] [falling-threshold]

1.24.1   Purpose

Displays the status of the IP addresses in the specified IP pool, in all IP pools in the specified interface, or in all IP pools in the current context or range.

1.24.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.24.3   Syntax Description

name

Optional. Name of the IP pool or interface for which the status of its IP addresses displays.

context summary

Optional. Summary information for all context level IP pool thresholds for the named context.

falling-threshold

Optional. Displays IP pool threshold data for all interfaces in the current context or for the specified interface only.

1.24.4   Default

None

1.24.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip pool command to display the status of the IP addresses in the specified IP pool, in all IP pools in the specified interface, or in all IP pools in the current context. The status of the IP addresses includes the number of addresses in use, available, and reserved. Reserved addresses include those used by an interface or the all ones or all zeros address for the interface.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.24.6   Examples

The following example displays status for all IP address pools in the ip-dial context, including a range of IP addresses for the isp1.net interface:

[local]Redback>context ip-dial



[ip-dial]Redback>show ip pool 
Interface "subscribers-am": 

        192.168.1.48     255.255.255.248    0 in use,   5 free, 3 reserved. 

Interface "subscribers-mr": 

        10.142.119.80    255.255.255.240    0 in use,  13 free, 3 reserved. 

Interface "subscribers-sz":

        192.168.2.0      255.255.255.0      0 in use, 253 free, 3 reserved. 
Interface "isp1.net":
10.1.1.2        10.1.1.100 0 in use,  99 free,   0 reserved

The following example displays the falling threshold data for all IP address pools in the ip-dial context:

[ip-dial]Redback>show ip pool falling-threshold
Context "ip-dial": falling-threshold 17 trap log 

Interface "subscribers-am": 

        192.168.1.48     255.255.255.248  falling-threshold   3 trap 

Interface "subscribers-mr": 

        10.142.119.80    255.255.255.240  falling-threshold   5 trap log 

Interface "subscribers-sz": 

        192.168.2.0      255.255.255.0    falling-threshold   33 log 

The following example displays the status of the IP addresses in the ip-pool pool for the isp1.net context:

[local]Redback>context isp1.net



[isp1.net]Redback>show ip pool ip-pool



Interface "isp1.net":

   10.1.1.0        /24  ip-pool 0 in use, 253 free,   3 reserved

The following example displays a summary of all contexts in the IP pool for the isp1.net context:

[local]Redback>show ip pool context summary

falling-threshold absolute     1 759        trap log

falling-threshold percentage   1 98         trap

falling-threshold percentage   2 97         trap log



9         in use, 750       free, 9         reserved

768       total,  97  available percentage

1.25   show ip prefix-list

show ip prefix-list [pl-name | first-match pl-name ip-addr/prefix-length | summary [pl-name]]

1.25.1   Purpose

Displays information about configured IP prefix lists.

1.25.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.25.3   Syntax Description

pl-name

Optional. IP prefix list name.

first-match

Optional. Searches for the line in the IP prefix list specified by the pl-name argument.

ip-addr/prefix-length

Specifies the IP address, in the form A.B.C.D, and the prefix length, separated by the slash (/) character. The range of values for the prefix-length argument is 0 to 32.

summary

Optional. Displays summary information for all configured IP prefix lists.

1.25.4   Default

None

1.25.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip prefix-list command to display information about configured IP prefix lists.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.25.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip prefix-list command:

[local]Redback>show ip prefix-list
ip prefix-list slash9:

 count: 1, sequences: 10 - 10, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 permit 17.0.0.0/9  (hit count: 6)



ip prefix-list slash18:

 count: 1, sequences: 10 - 10, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 permit 192.28.0.0/18  (hit count: 11)



ip prefix-list /15-deny:

 count: 2, sequences: 10 - 20, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 deny 0.0.0.0/0 eq 15  (hit count: 2171)

   seq 20 permit 0.0.0.0/0 le 32  (hit count: 699090)



ip prefix-list 2.0.0.0/8:

 count: 1, sequences: 10 - 10, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 permit 2.0.0.0/8  (hit count: 0)



ip prefix-list /22-permit:

 count: 1, sequences: 10 - 10, client count: 1

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 permit 0.0.0.0/0 eq 22  (hit count: 46181)



ip prefix-list deny-slash-13:

 count: 2, sequences: 10 - 20, client count: 0

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 deny 139.112.0.0/13  (hit count: 0)

   seq 20 permit 0.0.0.0/0 le 32  (hit count: 0)



ip prefix-list deny-slash-14:

 count: 2, sequences: 10 - 20, client count: 0

 modified: 2 day(s), 6 hour(s) ago

   seq 10 deny 141.40.0.0/14  (hit count: 0)

   seq 20 permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 1  (hit count: 0)



total ip prefix lists: 7

1.26   show ip route

show ip route [ip-addr [/prefix-length [longer-prefixes | shorter-prefixes]] [detail]

1.26.1   Purpose

Displays information about all IP routes or routes for only the specified IP address or IP prefix.

1.26.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.26.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

Optional. IP address, in the form A.B.C.D, of the route to be displayed.

prefix-length

Optional. Prefix length. The range of values is 0 to 32.

longer-prefixes

Optional. Displays the route and more-specific routes.

shorter-prefixes

Optional. Displays the route and less-specific routes.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.26.4   Default

When entered with no keywords or arguments, this command displays all IP routes.

1.26.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route command to display information about all IP routes or for only the specified IP address or IP prefix.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.26.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip route command:

[local]Redback>show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route 



Gateway of last resort is 155.53.39.254 to network 0.0.0.0 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface



> S dv  0.0.0.0/0           155.53.39.254      1       0  00:00:36  op-net-lan

> S dv  100.100.0.0/16      155.53.39.254      1       0  00:00:31  op-net-lan

> C     155.53.32.0/21                         0       0  00:01:09  op-net-lan

> S     200.200.0.0/16                       255       0     1d02h  null0 

The following example displays information for the IP route, 4.4.4.0/24:

[local]Redback>show ip route 4.4.4.0/24
   Best match Routing entry for 4.4.4.0/24 is 4.4.4.0/24 , version 8

   Route Uptime 01:19:17

   Paths: total 1, best path count 1



   Route has been downloaded to following slots

    04/0



   Path information :



     Active path :

     Known via bgp 2, type-External BGP, distance 20, metric 0,

     Tag 0, Originating AS # : 1, Next-hop 20.1.1.1, NH-ID 0x31100003, Interface eth42

     Circuit 4/2:2047:31/1/2/6

     dscp ef

1.27   show ip route all

show ip route all

1.27.1   Purpose

Displays information about all IP routes.

1.27.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.27.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.27.4   Default

None

1.27.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route all command to display information about all IP routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.27.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip route all command:

[local]Redback>show ip route all
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route

Type   Network           Next Hop         Dist   Metric     UpTime   Interface

> S    0.0.0.0/0         10.13.49.254        1        0   00:00:20   mgmt

> R    1.1.1.0/24        100.1.1.1           1        0   00:00:03   five

> R    1.1.2.0/24        100.1.1.1           1        0   00:00:03   five

> R    1.1.3.0/24        100.1.1.1           1        0   00:00:03   five

> R    1.1.4.0/24        100.1.1.1           1        0   00:00:03   five

> R    1.1.5.0/24        100.1.1.1           1        0   00:00:03   five

> S    5.6.7.8/32                            211      0   00:00:20   null0

> C    10.1.7.0/24                           0        0   00:00:20   seven

> C H  10.1.7.0/32                           0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> C H  10.1.7.255/32                         0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> C    10.1.10.0/24                          0        0   00:00:20   ten

> C H  10.1.10.0/32                          0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> C H  10.1.10.255/32                        0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> C    10.13.49.0/24                         0        0   00:00:20   mgmt

> C H  10.13.49.0/32                         0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> C H  10.13.49.158/32                       0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> A H  10.13.49.254/3    10.13.49.254        254      0   00:00:20   mgmt

> C H  10.13.49.255/32                       0        0   00:00:20   Local host

> A H  100.1.1.1/32      100.1.1.1           254      0   00:00:03   five 

1.28   show ip route bgp

show ip route bgp

1.28.1   Purpose

Displays information about Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes.

1.28.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.28.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.28.4   Default

None

1.28.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route bgp command to display information about BGP routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.28.6   Examples

The following example displays information about BGP routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route bgp
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network            Next Hop         Dist   Metric     UpTime   Interface

> e B   3.0.0.0/8          155.53.1.235       20        0      1d14h

> e B   4.0.0.0/8          155.53.1.235       20        0   22:17:18

> e B   4.21.132.0/23      155.53.0.1         20        0   22:21:03

> e B   6.1.0.0/16         155.53.1.235       20        0       1w1d

> e B   6.2.0.0/22         155.53.0.1         20        0   22:21:03

> e B   6.3.0.0/18         155.53.1.235       20        0       1w1d

1.29   show ip route client

show ip route client [client-id]

1.29.1   Purpose

Displays information about Routing Information Base (RIB) clients.

1.29.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.29.3   Syntax Description

client-id

Optional. Client ID for which RIB client information is displayed. The range of values is 0 to 256.

1.29.4   Default

None

1.29.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route client command to display information about RIB clients.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see the “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.29.6   Examples

The following example displays information about RIB clients:

[local]Redback>show ip route client
Rt Tbl Version:      1820518, Nh Tbl Version: 9453

Protocol(ids)        Tot Routes   InQ  OutQ   Redist Ver  State   Ref 

connected  (1/0)             11     0     0            0  Reg UP    0

adjacency  (2/0)              0     0     0            0  Reg UP    0

static  (3/0)                14     0     0            0  Reg UP    0

isis A2-wtn  (4/0)           45     0     0            0  Reg UP    0

isis new  (5/0)               0     0     0            0  Reg UP    0

bgp 64001  (6/0)         101560     0     0            0  Reg UP    0

1.30   show ip route connected

show ip route connected

1.30.1   Purpose

Displays information about IP routes from directly connected networks.

1.30.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.30.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.30.4   Default

None

1.30.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route connected command to display information about IP routes from directly connected networks.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.30.6   Examples

The following example displays information about IP routes from directly connected networks:

[local]Redback>show ip route connected
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network            Next Hop         Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> C     10.12.208.0/21                         0       0      1w4d  redback

> C H   10.12.208.0/32                         0       0      1w4d  Local host

> C H   10.12.208.79/32                        0       0      1w4d  Local host

> C H   10.12.215.255/32                       0       0      1w4d  Local host

> C     10.100.1.5/32                          0       0      1w4d  lo1

> C     10.100.11.8/29                         0       0      1w4d  1/1

1.31   show ip route fib-client

show ip route fib-client [client-id]

1.31.1   Purpose

Displays information about Forwarding Information Base (FIB) clients.

1.31.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.31.3   Syntax Description

client-id

Optional. Client ID for which FIB client information is displayed. The range of values is 0 to 256.

1.31.4   Default

None

1.31.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route fib-client command to display information about FIB clients.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.31.6   Examples

The following example displays information about FIB clients:

[local]Redback>show ip route fib-client
Route table version 27113/778

    Total route for FIB 19937



Slot Name            State  OutQ   MsgSent  Version

FIB SLOT 02/0(0)     Up        0      1612  27113/778

FIB SLOT 02/1(1)     Up        0         1  0/778

FIB SLOT 10/0(2)     Up        0      1612  27113/778

FIB SLOT 10/1(3)     Up        0       184  0/778

1.32   show ip route hidden

show ip route hidden

1.32.1   Purpose

Displays information about hidden IP routes; that is, routes that are added internally.

1.32.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.32.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.32.4   Default

None

1.32.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route hidden command to display information about hidden IP routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.32.6   Examples

The following example displays information about hidden IP routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route hidden
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> C H   10.12.192.0/32                         0       0  05:23:19  Local host

> A H   10.12.192.1/32      10.12.192.1      254       0  05:25:44  mgmt

> C H   10.12.192.73/32                        0       0  05:23:19  Local host

> C H   10.12.199.255/32                       0       0  05:23:19  Local host

> C H   10.12.208.0/32                         0       0  05:25:56  Local host

> A H   10.12.208.1/32      10.12.208.1      254       0  05:25:44  lab

1.33   show ip route iphost

show ip route iphost

1.33.1   Purpose

Displays the IP hosts that are in an "up" state for all interfaces bound to a port or permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

1.33.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.33.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.33.4   Default

None

1.33.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route iphost command to display the IP hosts that are in an "up" state for all interfaces bound to a port or PVC. (This command does not show any IP hosts that are in a "down" state.) IP hosts are remote endpoints configured locally and connected physically to the port or PVC where they are configured. To configure an IP host, use the ip host command.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in Using the CLI.

1.33.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip route iphost command. The entries with the IPH prefix are IP hosts manually defined using the ip host command.

[local]Redback>show ip route iphost

Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP
        A,H - derived hidden
        O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,
        N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2
        E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2
        i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT
        IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static
        M F - Mobile Sub Foreign Agent, M H - Mobile Sub Home Agent
        A - Derived Default, MeH - Media Nexthop
        >   - Active Route, * - LSP

Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface
 > IPH   100.0.0.4/32        100.0.0.4         16       0  00:10:43  ift1
 > IPH   100.0.0.10/32       100.0.0.10        16       0  00:10:43  ift1
 > IPH   200.0.0.20/32       200.0.0.20        16       0  00:04:11  ift2
 > IPH   200.0.0.30/32       200.0.0.30        16       0  00:04:11  ift2
 > IPH   200.0.0.40/32       200.0.0.40        16       0  00:02:24  ift2


1.34   show ip route isis

show ip route isis

1.34.1   Purpose

Displays information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) routes.

1.34.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.34.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.34.4   Default

None

1.34.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route isis command to display information about IS-IS routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see Modifying Output of show Commands in the document Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

1.34.6   Examples

The following example displays information about IS-IS routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route isis
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network             Next Hop         Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> i L1  10.100.1.3/32       10.100.11.25      115      12      1w1d  2/1

> i L1  10.100.1.5/32       10.100.11.27      115      13  20:46:52  2/1

> i L1  10.100.1.102/32     10.100.11.25      115      40  20:46:52  2/1

>                           10.100.11.27                             2/1

> i L1  10.100.11.8/29      10.100.11.27      115      22  20:46:52  2/1

> i L1  10.100.11.32/29     10.100.11.25      115      39      1w1d  2/1

1.35   show ip route martian

show ip route martian

1.35.1   Purpose

Displays information about IP martian routes.

1.35.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.35.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.35.4   Default

None

1.35.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route martian command to display information about IP martian routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.35.6   Examples

The following example displays information about IP martian routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route martian
       0.0.0.0/8         orlonger   --  disallowed

     127.0.0.0/8         orlonger   --  disallowed

1.36   show ip route mobile-ip

show ip route mobile-ip [foreign-agent | home-agent]

1.36.1   Purpose

Displays IP routes for mobile nodes for an foreign-agent (FA) instance or home-agent (HA) instance.

1.36.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.36.3   Syntax Description

foreign-agent

Displays IP route information for an FA instance.

home-agent

Displays IP route information for a HA instance.

1.36.4   Default

None

1.36.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route mobile-ip command to display IP routes for an foreign-agent (FA) instance or home-agent (HA) instance.

To see a summary of IP routes, use the show ip route command (in any mode) with the summary keyword.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.36.6   Examples

The following example shows how to display IP routes for an HA instance:

[local]Redback>show ip route mobile-ip home-agent

Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B

- IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1 - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1 - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2 - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       MIP F - Mobile-IP Foreign Agent, MIP H - Mobile-IP Home Agent

       A - Derived Default, MH - Media Nexthop

       > - Active Route, * - LSP



Type       Network             Next Hop    Dist     Metric       UpTime  

Interface  SUB A 16.1.1.1/32   16.1.1.1    15        0  02:51:03  mip1

1.37   show ip route multicast

show ip route multicast [ip-addr[/prefix-length]] [bgp] [isis] [martian] [next-hop] [static] [summary]

1.37.1   Purpose

Displays all unicast-dependent multicast routing table information.

1.37.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.37.3   Syntax Description

ip-addr

Optional. IP address, in the form A.B.C.D, of the route to be displayed.

prefix-length

Optional. Prefix length. The range of values is 0 to 32.

bgp

Optional. Displays Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routing information.

isis

Optional. Displays Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) routing information.

martian

Optional. Displays configured Martian Networks information.

next-hop

Optional. Displays next-hop information.

static

Optional. Displays static route information.

summary

Optional. Displays summary information for all routes.

1.37.4   Default

None

1.37.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route multicast command to display all unicast-dependent multicast routing table information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.37.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip route multicast command issued on a router configured with three BGP multicast routes and two mstatic routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route multicast
Codes: e MB - Multicast EBGP, i MB - Multicast IBGP, S - mstatic

       >   - Active Route 



Type    Network         Next Hop      Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> S     1.1.1.1/32      10.200.1.1       1       0  00:07:46     

> e B   11.1.1.0/24     10.200.1.1      20       0  00:03:46     

> i B   103.1.1.0/24    10.200.1.3     200       0  00:08:52     

> i B   105.1.1.0/24    10.200.1.3     200       0  00:08:52     

> S     192.64.1.0/24   10.200.1.1       1       0  00:07:46 

1.38   show ip route next-hop

show ip route next-hop [next-hop-id | next-hop-ip-addr] [detail]

1.38.1   Purpose

Displays information about IP route next hops.

1.38.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.38.3   Syntax Description

next-hop-id

Optional. Next-hop ID in hexadecimal format. The range of values is 0x0 to 0xffffffff.

next-hop-ip-addr

Optional. Next-hop IP address.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

1.38.4   Default

None

1.38.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route next-hop command to display information about IP route next hops.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.38.6   Examples

The following example displays summary information about all IP route next hops:

[local]Redback>show ip route next-hop
** = Via interface

    Next Hop Tbl Version :        778

    Current Next Hops    :         41



NH-ID                 Ref Cnt   NH-IP             Via-NH     Interface

0x30D00002               47/0                                Local host

0x31100001                1/0                                test

0x31100002                1/0                                lab

0x31100003                1/0   10.12.208.81                 lab

0x31100004                1/0   10.12.210.27                 lab

0x31100005                2/2   10.12.208.1                  lab

0x31100006                2/0   10.12.192.1                  mgmt

0x31100007                1/0   10.12.208.170                lab

The following example displays detailed information about the IP route next hop, 0x31100001:

[local]Redback>show ip route next-hop 0x31100001 detail



    ** = Via interface

    Next Hop Tbl Version :          5

    Current Next Hops    :          4



NH-ID                 Ref Cnt NH-IP            Via-NH     Interface



0x31100001                1/0                             test

Adj-id         : 0xFF400008

Info-Version   : 5                   Node-Version   : 5

Fib Card bits  : 0x100010            Nh Client bits : 0x0

Info flags     : 0x1                 Lsp ifgrid     : 0x0

Spg-id         : 0x1

IF-GRID        : 0x10000001

Circuit id     : 255/22:1:26/1/1/4





Next-hop has been downloaded to following slots  05/0, 05/1

1.39   show ip route ospf

show ip route ospf

1.39.1   Purpose

Displays information about Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routes.

1.39.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.39.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.39.4   Default

None

1.39.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route ospf command to display information about OSPF routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.39.6   Examples

The following example displays information about OSPF routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route ospf
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network             Next Hop         Dist   Metric   UpTime   Interface

> O     10.100.1.102/32     10.100.11.50     110         2     1w4d   fa3/1

  O     10.100.11.8/29      10.100.11.10     110         1            1/1

  O     10.100.11.24/29     10.100.11.27     110         1            2/1

> O     10.100.11.32/29     10.100.11.50     110         2     1w4d   fa3/1

  O     10.100.11.48/29     10.100.11.49     110         1            fa3/1

1.40   show ip route registered

show ip route registered {next-hop | prefix}

1.40.1   Purpose

Displays next-hop or prefix information registered in the Routing Information Base (RIB).

1.40.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.40.3   Syntax Description

next-hop

Displays RIB-registered next-hop information.

prefix

Displays RIB-registered prefix information.

1.40.4   Default

None

1.40.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route registered command to display next-hop or prefix information registered in the RIB.

Note:  
Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) information is displayed in the show ip route registered command output only when there are active BFD clients (routing protocols that have BFD enabled).

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.40.6   Examples

The following example displays next-hop information registered in the RIB:

[local]Redback>show ip route registered next-hop



Next-hop:           Registered Client(s):



1.1.1.2             bgp 1

BFD Clients    : bgp

Query flags    : 0x40             Version        : 0x0

Adj-id         : 0xFFFFFFFF       Conn Adj-id    : 0xFFFFFFFF

NH Magic       : 0x1000400        Default flag   : 0x0

Protocol       : 0x1              IGP Metric     : 0

Conn IF-GRID   : 0x10000001       Conn cct id    : 255/11:1023:63/1/2/5

IGP IF-GRID    : 0x10000001       IGP cct id     : 255/11:1023:63/1/2/5

Reslov cntxt   : 0x40080001       IGP MTU        : 1500

IGP first hop  : 0.0.0.0          IGP next hop   : 0.0.0.0

slot 1: 2 constituent circuits

The following example displays prefix information registered in the RIB:

[local]Redback>show ip route registered prefix



Prefix:             Registered Client(s):



1.1.1.0/24          ldp

Verion         : 0x1                Lookup type    : 0x2

Return pfx ver : 0x1C               Return pfx     : 1.1.1.0/24

Default flag   : 0x0



10.12.49.0/24       ldp

Verion         : 0x2                Lookup type    : 0x2

Return pfx ver : 0x1                Return pfx     : 10.12.49.0/24

Default flag   : 0x0

1.41   show ip route rip

show ip route rip

1.41.1   Purpose

Displays information about Routing Information Protocol (RIP) routes.

1.41.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.41.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.41.4   Default

None

1.41.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route rip command to display information about RIP routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.41.6   Examples

The following example displays information about RIP routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route rip
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Start loop Old index =0xa4

Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> R     1.1.1.0/24          100.1.1.1          1       0  00:21:58  five

> R     1.1.2.0/24          100.1.1.1          1       0  00:21:58  five

> R     1.1.3.0/24          100.1.1.1          1       0  00:21:58  five

1.42   show ip route static

show ip route static

1.42.1   Purpose

Displays information about static IP routes.

1.42.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.42.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.42.4   Default

None

1.42.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route static command to display information about static IP routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.42.6   Examples

The following example displays information about static IP routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route static
Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric     UpTime   Interface

> S     10.89.0.0/16                           1       0   05:28:55   null0

> S     10.89.89.0/24                          1       0   05:28:55   null0

> S     155.53.0.0/16       10.12.208.1        1       0   05:28:43   lab

> S     155.53.32.55/32     10.12.192.1        1       0   05:28:43   mgmt

> S dv  100.100.0.0/16      155.53.39.254      1       0   05:27:56   op-net-lan

1.43   show ip route subscriber

show ip route subscriber [address | static | aggregate ]

1.43.1   Purpose

Displays information about all subscriber routes.

1.43.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.43.3   Syntax Description

address

Optional. Displays only subscriber address route information.

static

Optional. Displays only subscriber static route information.

aggregate

Optional. Displays only subscriber route information.

1.43.4   Default

When entered with no keywords, this command displays all subscriber routes.

1.43.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route subscriber command to display information about all subscriber routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.43.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip route subscriber command:

[local]Redback>show ip route subscriber

Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       SUB P - AAA downloaded aggregate subscriber routes

       A - Derived Default, MeH - Media Nexthop

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP

The following example displays output from the show ip route subscriber address command:

[local]Redback>show ip route subscriber address



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> SUB A 20.1.1.2/32         20.1.1.2          15       0  00:01:40  to-dhcpclient

The following example displays output from the show ip route subscriber static command:

[local]Redback>show ip route subscriber static



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area, N1  - OSPF NSSA external type 1

       N2  - OSPF NSSA external type 2,  E1  - OSPF external type 1

       E2  - OSPF external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> SUB S 30.1.1.0/24         20.1.1.2          17       0  00:02:01  to-dhcpclient

The following example displays output from the show ip route subscriber aggregate command. In this command, SUB P entries indicates AAA downloaded aggregate subscriber routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route subscriber aggregate


Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP
       A,H - derived hidden
       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,
       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2
       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2
       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT
       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static
       SUB P - AAA downloaded aggregate subscriber routes
       M F - Mobile Sub Foreign Agent, M H - Mobile Sub Home Agent
       M G - Mobile Sub GTP
       A - Derived Default, MeH - Media Nexthop
       >   - Active Route, * - LSP

Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface
> SUB P 15.1.0.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.1.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.2.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.3.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.4.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.5.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.6.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.7.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.8.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.9.0/24                          253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.10.0/24                         253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.11.0/24                         253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.12.0/24                         253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.13.0/24                         253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.14.0/24                         253       1  00:09:00  null0
> SUB P 15.1.15.0/24                         253       1  00:09:00  null0

1.44   show ip route summary

show ip route summary

1.44.1   Purpose

Displays summary information for all IP routes.

1.44.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.44.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.44.4   Default

None

1.44.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route summary command to display summary information for all IP routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.44.6   Examples

The following example displays summary information for all IP routes:

[local]Redback>show ip route summary
Rt Tbl Version:      27144, Nh Tbl Version: 786

FIB Rt Tbl Version:  27144

Route Source             Tot-Routes     Act-Routes      Max Ever Reached

Connected                43             43              43

Static                    4              4               4

1.45   show ip route summary all-context

show ip route summary all-context

1.45.1   Purpose

Displays summary information for IP routes in all contexts.

1.45.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.45.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.45.4   Default

None

1.45.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route summary all-context command to display summary information for IP routes in all contexts.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.45.6   Examples

The following example displays summary information for all IP routes in the local and new contexts:

[local]Redback>show ip route summary all-context
Context:   local                          Context id:   0x40080001

------------------------------------------------------------------

Rt Tbl Version:      9, Nh Tbl Version: 5

FIB Rt Tbl Version:  9

Route Source                  Tot-Routes     Act-Routes  Max Ever Reached



Connected                              2              2                 2

Static                                 2              2                 2



Context:   new                            Context id:   0x40080002

------------------------------------------------------------------

Rt Tbl Version:      0, Nh Tbl Version: 0

FIB Rt Tbl Version:  0

                 No routes in Table

1.46   show ip route xcrp

show ip route xcrp

1.46.1   Purpose

Displays IP route information for the controller card.

1.46.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.46.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.46.4   Default

None

1.46.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip route xcrp command to display IP route information for the controller card.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.46.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ip route xcrp command:

[local]Redback>show ip route xcrp
Routing tables



Internet:

Destination        Gateway            Flags    Refs      Use   Cntxt   Interface

default            10.12.208.1        UG1         4    17882       1   fxp0

3                  155.53.1.235       UG1         0        0       1   fxp0

4                  155.53.1.236       UG1         0        0       1   fxp0

4.21.132/23        155.53.1.236       UG1         0        0       1   fxp0

6.1/16             155.53.1.235       UG1         0        0       1   fxp0

6.2/22             155.53.1.236       UG1         0        0       1   fxp0

1.47   show ip statistics xcrp

show ip statistics xcrp

1.47.1   Purpose

Displays IP traffic statistics on the active controller card.

1.47.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.47.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.47.4   Default

None

1.47.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip statistics xcrp command to display IP traffic statistics on the active controller card. The IP traffic statistics display does not include statistics for forwarded traffic. The display shows only traffic whose destination or source addresses are on the system itself.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.47.6   Examples

The following example displays all IP traffic destined to or source by transmit or receive addresses in to, or sourced by, the system:

[local]Redback>show ip statistics xcrp
ip:

        331718 total packets received

        0 bad header checksums

        0 with size smaller than minimum

        0 with data size < data length

        0 with length > max ip packet size

        0 with header length < data size

        0 with data length < header length

        0 with bad options

        0 with incorrect version number

        0 fragments received    0 fragments dropped (dup or out of space)

        0 malformed fragments dropped

        0 fragments dropped after timeout

        0 packets reassembled ok

        314961 packets for this host

        11722 packets for unknown/unsupported protocol

        6 packets forwarded (0 packets fast forwarded)

        5129 packets not forwardable

        5 redirects sent

        88051 packets sent from this host

        17 packets sent with fabricated ip header

        0 output packets dropped due to no bufs, etc.

        0 output packets discarded due to no route

        0 output datagrams fragmented

        0 fragments created

        0 datagrams that can't be fragmented 

1.48   show ipv6 access-list

show ipv6 access-list

1.48.1   Purpose

Displays the status of configured IPv6 ACLs.

1.48.2   Command Mode

exec

1.48.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.48.4   Default

None

1.48.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 access-list command to display the status of configured IPv6 ACLs.

1.48.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ipv6 access-list command:

[local]Redback#show ipv6 access-list
ipv6 access-list list100:
 count: 9, sequences: 10 - 90, client count: 0
 modified: 00:00:03 (hh:mm:ss) ago, version: 19
  seq 10 permit ipv6 any 11::1/128
  seq 20 permit ipv6 any 11::2/128
  seq 30 permit ipv6 any 11::3/128
  seq 40 permit ipv6 any 11::4/128
  seq 50 permit ipv6 any 11::5/128
  seq 60 permit ipv6 any 11::6/128
  seq 70 permit ipv6 any 11::7/128
  seq 80 permit ipv6 any 11::8/128
  seq 90 deny ipv6 any any

ipv6 access-list list6:
 count: 1, sequences: 88 - 88, client count: 0
 modified: 01:54:25 (hh:mm:ss) ago, version: 3
  seq 88 permit ipv6 any any

total ipv6 access lists: 2

1.49   show ipv6 all-host

show ipv6 all-host

1.49.1   Purpose

Displays a list of all static and dynamic IPv6 hosts in the current context.

1.49.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.49.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.49.4   Default

None

1.49.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 all-host command to display a list of all static and dynamic IPv6 hosts in the current context. The output of this command maps host names to their IPv6 addresses.

1.49.6   Examples

The following example shows how to use the show ipv6 all-host command:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 all-host


1.50   show ipv6 dynamic-host

show ipv6 dynamic-host

1.50.1   Purpose

Displays a list of all dynamic IPv6 hosts in the current context.

1.50.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.50.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.50.4   Default

None

1.50.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 dynamic-host command to display a list of all dynamic IPv6 hosts in the current context. The output of this command maps host names to their IPv6 addresses.

1.50.6   Examples

The following example shows how to use the show ipv6 dynamic-host command:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 dynamic-host


1.51   show ipv6 host

show iv6p host

1.51.1   Purpose

Displays all static hostname-to-IP Version 6 (IPv6) address mappings stored in the local host table for the current context.

1.51.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.51.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.51.4   Default

None

1.51.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 host command to display all static hostname-to-IPv6 address mappings stored in the local host table for the current context.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.51.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ipv6 host command:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 host



Host Name                IP Address       Type        TTL

host1                    172.2.3.1        static      0

host2                    172.2.3.2        static      0

host3                    172.2.3.3        static      0

1.52   show ipv6 interface

show ipv6 interface [{if-name | brief}]

1.52.1   Purpose

Displays information about IP Version 6 (IPv6) interfaces, including the interface bound to the Ethernet management port on the controller card.

1.52.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.52.3   Syntax Description

if-name

Optional. Name of the IPv6 interface to be displayed.

brief

Optional. Displays the name, IPv6 address, and other information (in brief) for all configured IPv6 interfaces in the current context.

1.52.4   Default

Displays detailed information for all configured IPv6 interfaces.

1.52.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 interface command to display information about all IPv6 interfaces, including those on the controller card. Use this command without optional syntax to display detailed information on all configured IPv6 interfaces.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct before the show command to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

An interface can be in any of the following states:

1.52.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ipv6 interface command with the brief keyword:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 interface brief:

Mon Jun 27 06:38:05 2005

Name              Address                  MTU    State      Bindings

fe13/3            3.2.13.3/16              1500   Up         ethernet 13/3

fe13/4            4.2.13.4/16              1500   Up         ethernet 13/4

5/1               10.13.49.166/24          1500   Up         ethernet 5/1

12/1              10.1.1.1/16              0      UnBound

un1               (Un-numbered)            0      UnBound

lo1               100.1.1.1/16             1500   Up         (Loopback)

The following example displays information for the fe13/4 interface:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 interface fe13/4
Intf name:       fe13/4

Intf state:      Up                        MTU:              1500

IP address:      4.2.13.4                  Prefix len:       16

ISIS Tag:        1                         Levels:           level-1-2

ISIS Metric:     10                        Authentication:   none

OSPF instance:   1                         OSPF net type:    broadcast

OSPF cost:       1                         OSPF state        BDR

Resoln type:     Arp                       ARP timeout       3600

ARP Proxy:       Enabled



Bindings:

Encapsulation    Circuit

ethernet         13/4

1.53   show ipv6 mroute

show ipv6 mroute [first-ipv6-address second-ipv6-address] [count | detail]

1.53.1   Purpose

Displays information about the IPv6 multicast routes configured on the system.

1.53.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.53.3   Syntax Description

first-ipv6-address

Specifies an IPv6 address in format A:B:C:D:E:F:G:H.

second-ipv6-address

Specifies a second IPv6 address in the format A:B:C:D:E:F:G:H.

count

Displays IPv6 multicast counters.

detail

Displays detailed information for the specified IPv6 routes or for all IPv6 routes configured on the system.

1.53.4   Default

Enter the show ipv6 mroute command without any of the optional keyword or arguments to display summarized information for all IPv6 multicast routes on the system.

1.53.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 mroute command to display information about the IPv6 multicast routes configured on the system.

1.53.6   Examples

The following example shows how to use the show ipv6 mroute command:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 mroute


1.54   show ipv6 pool

show ipv6 pool[[dhcpv6] [pool-name]thresholds | summary]

1.54.1   Purpose

Displays allocation information about the shared IPv6 and DHCPv6 PD prefix pools configured in the current context.

1.54.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.54.3   Syntax Description

dhcpv6

Displays information about DHCPv6-PD pools.

pool-name

Name of the pool for which you want to display information.

thresholds

Displays threshold information for a specific IPv6 pool, or for all IPv6 pools configured in the current context.

summary

Displays summarized information about all IPv6 pools configured in the current context.

1.54.4   Default

When entered without any optional keywords or arguments, this command displays summarized information for all shared IPv6 pools configured in the current context.

1.54.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 pool command to display allocation information about the shared IPv6 and DHCPv6 PD prefix pools configured in the current context..

1.54.6   Examples

The following example displays information about the shared IPv6 prefix pools configured in the local context:

[local]Redback#show ipv6 pool

Interface "subs":
  2001:db8:1::/64    2001:db8:1:4::/64          0 in-use, 20480 free,   0 reserved

The following example displays information for the DHCPv6 PD pools configured in the context m1:

[local]Redback#context m1

[m1]Redback#show ipv6 pool dhcpv6

Interface "subs":
  3001:db8:1:1::/64    3001:db8:1:100::/64                0 in-use, 4096 free,   0 reserved
  3002:db8:1:1::/64    3002:db8:1:100::/64                0 in-use, 4096 free,   0 reserved
 

1.55   show ipv6 prefix-list

show ipv6 prefix-list [pl-name | first-match pl-name ipv6-addr/prefix-length | summary [pl-name]]

1.55.1   Purpose

Displays information about configured IP Version 6 (IPv6) prefix lists.

1.55.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.55.3   Syntax Description

pl-name

Optional. IPv6 prefix list name.

first-match

Optional. Searches for the line in the IPv6 prefix list specified by the pl-name argument.

ipv6-addr/prefix-length

Specifies the IPv6 address, in the form A:B:C:D:E:F:G:H, and the prefix length, separated by the slash (/) character. The range of values for the prefix-length argument is 0 to 128.

summary

Optional. Displays summary information for all configured IPv6 prefix lists.

1.55.4   Default

None

1.55.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 prefix-list command to display information about configured IPv6 prefix lists.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.55.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ipv6 prefix-list command:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 prefix-list



ipv6 prefix-list list1:

 count: 2, sequences: 10 - 20, client count: 0

 modified: 00:00:13 (hh:mm:ss) ago

   seq 10 permit a001::/64 ge 64 le 128  (hit count: 0)

   seq 20 permit b002::/48 ge 48 le 128  (hit count: 0)

1.56   show ipv6 route

show ipv6 route [ipv6-addr [/prefix-length [longer-prefixes | shorter-prefixes | detail]] | all | bgp | connected | context | fib-client client-id | hidden | interface [nexthop-id ][detail] | iphost | isis | multicast [ip-addr[/prefix-length]] [bgp] [next-hop] [ripng] [static] [summary] | next-hop | ospf3 | registered | ripng | static | subscriber | summary | xcrp]

1.56.1   Purpose

Displays information about IP version 6 (IPv6) routes.

1.56.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.56.3   Syntax Description

ipv6-addr

Optional. IPv6 address, in the form A:B:C:D:E:E:F:G, of the route to be displayed.

prefix-length

Optional. Prefix length. The range of values is 0 to 128.

longer-prefixes

Optional. Displays the route and more-specific routes.

shorter-prefixes

Optional. Displays the route and less-specific routes.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed information.

all

Optional. Displays information about all IPv6 routes.

bgp

Optional. Displays Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) route information.

connected

Optional. Displays information about IPv6 routes from directly connected networks.

context

Optional. Displays information about an IPv6 route context.

fib-client

Optional. Displays RIB FIB client information.

hidden

Optional. Displays information about hidden IPv6 routes; that is, routes that are added internally.

interface

Optional. Displays information about the interfaces in the RIB. You can display information for a particular nexthop ID, and you can display details for all interfaces in the RIB.

nexthop-id

Nexthop identifier, expressed in hexadecimal format.

iphost

Optional. Displays information about IP host address routes.

isis

Optional. Displays information about IS-IS IPv6 routes.

multicast

Optional. Displays unicast-dependent multicast routing table information.

next-hop

Optional. Displays next-hop information.

ospf3

Optional. Displays information about OSPFv3 IPv6 routes.

ripng

Optional. Displays next Routing Information Protocol next generation (RIPng) route information.

static

Optional. Displays static route information.

subscriber

Optional. Displays information about IPv6 subscriber routes.

summary

Optional. Displays summary route information.

registered

Optional. Displays registered IPv6 route information.

xcrp

Optional. Displays IPv6 route information for the controller card.

1.56.4   Default

When entered with no keywords or arguments, this command displays all IP routes.

1.56.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show ipv6 route command to display information about IPv6 routes.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.56.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show ipv6 route command:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> C     4001::/64                              0       0     1d02h  to-peer   

> C     5001:2201:ff31:9900::/64               0       0     1d02h  to-core   

> S     6001:aaaa:bbbb:cccc::/64

                            4001::2            1       0  05:11:09  to-peer   

> C     7001::/112                             0       0  00:17:47  to-nbor   

> S     7001:dddd:eeee:ffff:1::/112            1       0  05:11:09  to-core   

> C     8001::1/128                            0       0  00:15:39  lo        

> R     8001::2/128         fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294

                                             120       1  00:08:09  to-nbor   

> e B   9001::/64           7001::ff          20       0  00:01:51  to-nbor   

> e B   9002::/64           7001::ff          20       0  00:01:51  to-nbor   

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1104/128           0       0     1d02h  to-peer   

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1105/128           0       0     1d02h  to-core   

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1109/128           0       0  00:17:47  to-nbor   

The following example displays information for the IPv6 route, 8001::2/128:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route 8001::2/128



    Best match Routing entry for 8001::2/128 is 8001::2/128 , version 21

    Route Uptime 00:08:45

    Paths: total 1, best path count 1 



    Route has been downloaded to following slots

     03/0



    Path information : 



      Active path : 

      Known via rip 1, distance 120, metric 1,

      Tag 0, Next-hop fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294, NH-ID 0x31100005, Adj ID: 0x2000

001, Lsp ifgrid: 0x201FFFF, Interface to-nbor

      Circuit 3/6:1023:63/1/1/11

The following example displays information for all IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route all



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> C     4001::/64                              0       0     1d02h  to-peer   

> C H   4001::/128                             0       0     1d02h  to-peer   

> C H   4001::1/128                            0       0     1d02h  to-peer   

> A H   4001::2/128         4001::2          254       0  05:11:58  to-peer   

> C     5001:2201:ff31:9900::/64               0       0     1d02h  to-core   

> C H   5001:2201:ff31:9900::/128              0       0     1d02h  to-core   

> C H   5001:2201:ff31:9900::fe/128            0       0     1d02h  to-core   

> S     6001:aaaa:bbbb:cccc::/64

                            4001::2            1       0  05:11:58  to-peer   

> C     7001::/112                             0       0  00:18:36  to-nbor   

> C H   7001::/128                             0       0  00:18:36  to-nbor   

> C H   7001::1/128                            0       0  00:18:36  to-nbor   

> A H   7001::ff/128        7001::ff         254       0  00:11:36  to-nbor   

> S     7001:dddd:eeee:ffff:1::/112            1       0  05:11:58  to-core   

> C     8001::1/128                            0       0  00:16:28  lo        

> R     8001::2/128  fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294 120      1  00:08:58  to-nbor   

> e B   9001::/64           7001::ff          20       0  00:02:40  to-nbor   

> e B   9002::/64           7001::ff          20       0  00:02:40  to-nbor   

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1104/128           0       0     1d02h  to-peer   

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1105/128           0       0     1d02h  to-core   

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1109/128           0       0  00:18:36  to-nbor   

> A H   fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294/128

        fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294             254       0  00:11:36  to-nbor   

The following example displays information for the BGP routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route bgp



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> e B   9001::/64           7001::ff          20       0  00:02:59  to-nbor

> e B   9002::/64           7001::ff          20       0  00:02:59  to-nbor

The following example displays information for the connected IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route connected



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> C     4001::/64                              0       0     1d02h  to-peer

> C H   4001::/128                             0       0     1d02h  to-peer

> C H   4001::1/128                            0       0     1d02h  to-peer

> C     5001:2201:ff31:9900::/64               0       0     1d02h  to-core

> C H   5001:2201:ff31:9900::/128              0       0     1d02h  to-core

> C H   5001:2201:ff31:9900::fe/128            0       0     1d02h  to-core

> C     7001::/112                             0       0  00:19:06  to-nbor

> C H   7001::/128                             0       0  00:19:06  to-nbor

> C H   7001::1/128                            0       0  00:19:06  to-nbor

> C     8001::1/128                            0       0  00:16:58  lo

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1104/128           0       0     1d02h  to-peer

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1105/128           0       0     1d02h  to-core

> C     fe80::230:88ff:fe00:1109/128           0       0  00:19:06  to-nbor

The following example displays information for the hidden IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route hidden



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface

> C H   4001::/128                             0       0     1d02h  to-peer

> C H   4001::1/128                            0       0     1d02h  to-peer

> A H   4001::2/128         4001::2          254       0  05:12:43  to-peer

> C H   5001:2201:ff31:9900::/128              0       0     1d02h  to-core

> C H   5001:2201:ff31:9900::fe/128            0       0     1d02h  to-core

> C H   7001::/128                             0       0  00:19:21  to-nbor

> C H   7001::1/128                            0       0  00:19:21  to-nbor

> A H   7001::ff/128        7001::ff         254       0  00:12:21  to-nbor

> A H   fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294/128

        fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294             254       0  00:12:21  to-nbor

The following example displays information about next-hop IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route next-hop



    ** = Via interface

    Next Hop Tbl Version :         14

    Current Next Hops    :          7



NH-ID                 Ref Cnt NH-IP            Via-NH     Interface

0x30D00003               10/0                             Local host

0x31100001                1/0                             to-peer

0x31100002                2/0                             to-core

0x31100003                2/0 4001::2                     to-peer

0x31100004                1/0                             to-nbor

0x31100005                2/0 fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294            to-nbor

0x31100006                3/0 7001::ff                    to-nbor

The following example displays information for registered next-hop IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route registered next-hop



Next-hop:           Registered Client(s):



4001::2             static 

Query flags    : 0x40                Version        : 0x1              

Adj-id         : 0x2000000           Conn Adj-id    : 0x2000008        

NH Magic       : 0x1000000           Default flag   : 0x0              

Protocol       : 0x1                 IGP Metric     : 0              

Conn IF-GRID   : 0x10000001          Conn cct id    : 3/1:1023:63/1/1/5

IGP IF-GRID    : 0x10000001          IGP cct id     : 3/1:1023:63/1/1/5

Reslov cntxt   : 0x40080001          IGP MTU        : 1500           

IGP first hop  : 0.0.0.0             IGP next hop   : 0.0.0.0        



5001::1             static 

Query flags    : 0x0                 Version        : 0x0              

Adj-id         : 0xFFFFFFFF          Conn Adj-id    : 0xFFFFFFFF       

NH Magic       : 0x0                 Default flag   : 0x0              

Protocol       : 0x0                 IGP Metric     : -1             

Conn IF-GRID   : 0x0                 Conn cct id    : Cct invalid    

IGP IF-GRID    : 0x0                 IGP cct id     : Cct invalid    

Reslov cntxt   : 0x40080001          IGP MTU        : 0              

IGP first hop  : 0.0.0.0             IGP next hop   : 0.0.0.0        



7001::ff            bgp 100

Query flags    : 0x40                Version        : 0x0              

Adj-id         : 0x2000002           Conn Adj-id    : 0x200000A        

NH Magic       : 0x1000000           Default flag   : 0x0              

Protocol       : 0x1                 IGP Metric     : 0              

Conn IF-GRID   : 0x10000003          Conn cct id    : 3/6:1023:63/1/1/11

IGP IF-GRID    : 0x10000003          IGP cct id     : 3/6:1023:63/1/1/11

Reslov cntxt   : 0x40080001          IGP MTU        : 1500           

IGP first hop  : 0.0.0.0             IGP next hop   : 0.0.0.0        

The following example displays information about RIP routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route rip



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type  Network      Next Hop                  Dist  Metric    UpTime     Interface

> R   8001::2/128  fe80::230:88ff:fe00:3294  120   1         00:11:24   to-nbor   

The following example displays information for the static IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route static



Codes: C - connected, S - static, S dv - dvsr, R - RIP, e B - EBGP, i B - IBGP

       A,H - derived hidden

       O   - OSPF, O3  - OSPFv3, IA - OSPF(v3) inter-area,

       N1  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 1, N2  - OSPF(v3) NSSA external type 2

       E1  - OSPF(v3) external type 1, E2  - OSPF(v3) external type 2

       i   - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1,  L2  - IS-IS level-2, N - NAT

       IPH - IP Host, SUB A - Subscriber address, SUB S - Subscriber static

       A - Derived Default

       >   - Active Route, * - LSP 



Type    Network             Next Hop        Dist  Metric    UpTime  Interface 

> S     6001:aaaa:bbbb:cccc::/64

                            4001::2            1       0    05:14:38  to-peer   

> S     7001:dddd:eeee:ffff:1::/112            1       0    05:14:38  to-core   

The following example displays summary information for the IPv6 routes:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route summary



Rt Tbl Version:      23, Nh Tbl Version: 14

FIB Rt Tbl Version:  23

Route Source                  Tot-Routes     Act-Routes  Max Ever Reached



Connected                              7              7                 7

Static                                 2              2                 2

Rip                                    1              1                 1

EBGP                                   2              2                 2

The following example displays IPv6 route information for the controller card:

[local]Redback>show ipv6 route xcrp



Routing tables



Internet6:

Destination               Gateway               Flags   Refs   Use  Cntxt  Interface

default                   link#10               UL1       1     27      1  xcrp

::1                       ::1                   UH        0      0      1  lo0

fe80::%fxp0/64            link#1                UC        0      0      1  fxp0

fe80::%lo0/64             fe80::1%lo0           U         0      0      1  lo0

fe80::%xcrp/64            link#10               UC        0      0      1  xcrp

ff01::/32                 ::1                   U         0      0      1  lo0

ff02::%fxp0/32            link#1                UC        0      0      1  fxp0

ff02::%lo0/32             fe80::1%lo0           UC        0      0      1  lo0

ff02::%xcrp/32            link#10               UC        0      0      1  xcrp

1.57   show isis adjacency

show isis [instance-name] [multicast] adjacency [detail]

1.57.1   Purpose

Displays information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) neighbors.

1.57.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.57.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays information only about neighbors for the specified instance.

multicast

Optional. Displays multitopology IS-IS (M-ISIS) information.

detail

Optional. Displays additional information about IS-IS neighbors.

1.57.4   Default

Displays information for all IS-IS neighbors.

1.57.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis adjacency command to display information about IS-IS neighbors.For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

Table 9 describes the output fields for the show isis adjacency command.

Table 9    Field Descriptions for the show isis adjacency Command

Field

Description

SystemId

ID of an IS-IS in an area.

Interface

Interface advertising the IS-IS.

L

Level 1 routing only (1), level 2 routing only (2), or levels 1 and 2 (3) routing. Point-to-point adjacency is indicated with the letter p; for example, a level 2 routing with point-to-point adjacency displays as 2p.

MT

Multi-Topology. Indicates whether each IS-IS instance performs unicast (U), multicast (M), or unicast and multicast (UM) topology-based routing. Displays no value when the default routing topology, unicast, is used.

Stat

IS-IS adjacency state.

Hold

Time, in seconds, before an adjacency timeout occurs.

SNPA

Subnetwork Point of Attachment (SNPA) or the data-link address of the remote system.

Uptime

Time that the adjacency has been up.

1.57.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis adjacency command:

[local]Redback>show isis adjacency


IS-IS Adjacenc(ies) for tag 6:

SystemId        Interface          L  MT   Stat Hold   SNPA            Uptime

dtse            5                  1  U    Up   28     0030.8800.1115  03:44:46

Area Address(es): 47.0001

IP Address(es): 11.1.1.1

IPv6 Address: fe80::290:69ff:fea1:dc00

BFD state N/A

adj nh-id 6, neighbor sent re-start tlv

Total IS-IS Adjacenc(ies):   1

The following example displays output from the show isis adjacency detail command:


[local]Redback>show isis adjacency detail


IS-IS Adjacenc(ies) for tag 1:

SystemId Interface L MT Stat Hold SNPA Uptime 

dtse p2p 3p U Up 24 1111.1111.1111 01d23h17

Area Address(es): 47.0001

IP Address(es): 13.13.13.1

BFD state N/A

neighbor IIH current seq 17085, total iih pkt miss 0

adj nh-id 7

GR enabled state fresh

Total IS-IS Adjacenc(ies): 3

1.58   show isis adj-log

show isis [instance-name] adj-log [interface if-name | is sys-id]

1.58.1   Purpose

Displays adjacency logs.

1.58.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.58.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Only adjacency logs for the specified instance are displayed.

interface if-name

Optional. Interface name. Only adjacency logs for the specified interface are displayed.

is sys-id

Optional. System ID. Only adjacency logs for the specified system are displayed. The sys-id argument is either specified in xxxx.xxxx.xxxx format or as the hostname.

1.58.4   Default

Displays the last adjacency event for all IS-IS interfaces.

1.58.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis adj-log command to display adjacency logs. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

Table 10 describes the output fields for the show isis adj-log command.

Table 10    Field Descriptions for the show isis adj-log Command

Field

Description

Interface

Name of the interface to which the adjacency log belongs.

Type

Type of interface (LAN or point-to-point).

State

Interface state when the event occurred (up or down).

Adjs

Number of adjacencies when the event occurred.

Neighbor ID

System ID or the dynamic hostname of the neighbor system.

L

Level of the IS-IS adjacency (level 1, level 2, or levels 1 and 2).

Time

Amount of time that passed since the adjacency event.

MT

Multi-Topology. Indicates whether each IS-IS instance performs unicast (U), multicast (M), or unicast and multicast (UM) topology-based routing. Displays no value when the default routing topology, unicast, is used.

Action

Reason for the adjacency event.

1.58.6   Examples

The following example displays adjacency logs for the gre0 interface:

[local]Redback>show isis adj-log interface gre0
IS-IS tag test Adjacency log of events on interface gre0:

Interface    Type State Adjs NeighborID   L Time      MT  Action

gre0         p2p  Up    1    ns--edge     2 00:19:06      adj cleared

                  Up    1    ns--edge     2 00:26:33      adj is up

                  Up    1    ns--edge     3 01:25:27      adj is up

                  Up    0                 0 01:25:37      interface created

1.59   show isis database

show isis [instance-name] database [detail | extensive] [level-1 | level-2] {lsp-id | sys-id}

1.59.1   Purpose

Displays information about the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) link-state database.

1.59.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.59.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays database information only for the specified instance.

detail

Optional. Displays the content of each link-state protocol data unit (LSP).

extensive

Optional. Displays the context of each LSP and traffic engineering (TE) sub type-length-value (TLV) object for extended IS reachability TLVs.

level-1

Optional. Displays the link-state database for level 1 only.

level-2

Optional. Displays the link-state database for level 2 only.

lsp-id

LSP ID in the format nnnn.nnnn.nnnn.xx-yy. Displays only information pertaining to the specified LSP.

sys-id

IS-IS system ID in the format nnnn.nnnn.nnnn. Displays only information pertaining to all LSP IDs for the specified IS-IS system.

1.59.4   Default

Displays information for the LSP database.

1.59.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis database command to display information about the IS-IS link-state database. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

The output from the show isis database detail command displays the greater than (>) symbol next to the extended IS reachability TLV when it has traffic engineering information for the interface. Use the show isis database extensive command (in any mode) to see the detail traffic engineering information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.59.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis database command:

[local]Redback>show isis database
S-IS level 1 link-state database for tag 1:

LSPID                  Sequence   Checksum   Holdtime   AT/OL   Len

samedi.00-00*          0x62c      0x2ee7     1196       1/0     139


Total IS-IS LSP(s) for tag 1 in Level-1:   1


IS-IS level 2 link-state database for tag 1:

LSPID                  Sequence   Checksum   Holdtime   AT/OL   Len

m5-4.00-00             0x791f     0x45a3     1058       0/0     216

samedi.00-00*          0x503      0x3485     1195       0/0     583

samedi.02-00*          0xcac      0x15bb     399        0/0     55


Total IS-IS LSP(s) for tag 1 in Level-2:   3

The following example displays output from the show isis database detail command for IS-IS level-1 routing:

[local]Redback>show isis database detail level-1
LSPID                  Sequence   Checksum   Holdtime   AT/OL   Len

dtse.00-00             0x9d       0x5ca1     439        0/0     297

Area Address: 47.0001

NLPID:  IP

Hostname: dtse

Router ID: 10.14.100.1

IP Address: 11.11.11.1

M-Topology:

Metric: 10          IS-Extended sierra.01 >

Metric: 13          IS-Extended samedi.01 >

Metric: 10          IS-Extended sierra.02 >

Metric: 10          IP 11.11.11.0/24

Metric: 13          IP 5.5.5.0/24

Metric: 10          IP 12.12.12.0/24

sierra.00-00           0x88       0x37bf     952        0/0     240

Area Address: 47.0001

NLPID:  IP

Hostname: sierra

Router ID: 10.14.200.1

IP Address: 11.11.11.2

M-Topology:

Metric: 10          IS-Extended sierra.01 >

Metric: 10          IS-Extended sierra.02 >

Metric: 10          IP 11.11.11.0/24

Metric: 10          IP 12.12.12.0/24

Metric: 10          IP 100.1.1.0/24

Metric: 10          IP 200.1.1.0/24

sierra.01-00           0x6f       0xfd4e     952        0/0     53

Metric: 0           IS-Extended sierra.00

Metric: 0           IS-Extended dtse.00

sierra.02-00           0x6c       0xfc51     952        0/0     53

Metric: 0           IS-Extended sierra.00

Metric: 0           IS-Extended dtse.00

samedi.00-00*          0xdd       0xadf7     599        0/0     141

Area Address: 47.0001

NLPID:  IP

Hostname: samedi

Router ID: 6.6.6.6

IP Address: 5.5.5.6

M-Topology:

Metric: 20          IS-Extended samedi.01 >

Metric: 20          IP 5.5.5.0/24

samedi.01-00*          0x84       0x6d96     599        0/0     53

Metric: 0           IS-Extended samedi.00

Metric: 0           IS-Extended dtse.00


Total IS-IS LSP(s) for tag 6 in Level-1:   6

The following example displays output from the show isis database extensive command:

[local]Redback#show isis database extensive
IS-IS level 1 link-state database for tag 1:

LSPID                  Sequence   Checksum   Holdtime   AT/OL   Len

samedi.00-00*          0x62d      0x2ce8     1192       1/0     139

Area Address: 47.0001

NLPID:  IP  IPv6

Hostname: samedi

IP Address: 1.1.1.1

M-Topology: ucast mcast v6ucast v6mcast

Local Interface IPv6 Address: 200:2003::2

Metric: 10          IP 13.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 1           IP 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255

Metric: 10          IP 12.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 10          Ucast-IPv6 2000:2002::/64


Total IS-IS LSP(s) for tag 1 in Level-1:   1


IS-IS level 2 link-state database for tag 1:

LSPID                  Sequence   Checksum   Holdtime   AT/OL   Len

m5-4.00-00             0x791f     0x45a3     946        0/0     216

Area Address: 47.0001

NLPID:  IP  IPv6

M-Topology: ucast mcast v6ucast

Hostname: m5-4

Metric: 10          IS samedi.02

Metric: 10          IS-v6ucast  samedi.02

Metric: 10          IS-Mcast  samedi.02

Metric: 0           IP 10.14.200.10 255.255.255.255

Metric: 10          IP 11.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 9000:9001::1/128

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 8000:8001::1/128

Metric: 15          Ucast-IPv6-Ext 123:123::/64

Metric: 10          Ucast-IPv6 50:1:1::/64

Metric: 10          Ucast-IPv6 fe00::/102

samedi.00-00*          0x504      0x3286     1184       0/0     583

Area Address: 47.0001

NLPID:  IP  IPv6

Hostname: samedi

IP Address: 1.1.1.1

M-Topology: ucast mcast v6ucast v6mcast

Local Interface IPv6 Address: 2000:2001::2

Metric: 63          IS samedi.02

Metric: 2000        IS-Mcast  samedi.02

Metric: 1999        IS-v6ucast  samedi.02

Metric: 63          IP 11.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 10          IP 13.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 1           IP 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255

Metric: 10          IP 12.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 2000        MCast-IP 11.1.0.0/16

Metric: 0           IP-External 9.9.9.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.1.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.2.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.3.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.4.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.5.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.6.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 0           IP-External 99.99.99.0 255.255.255.0

Metric: 1           IP 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255

Metric: 10          IP 12.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 10          IP 13.1.0.0 255.255.0.0

Metric: 1999        Ucast-IPv6 2000:2001::/64

Metric: 10          Ucast-IPv6 2000:2002::/64

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 555:555::/100

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 666:666::/100

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 777:777::/100

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 888:888::/100

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 50:1:1::/64

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 123:123::/64

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 2000:2001::/64

Metric: 10          Ucast-IPv6 2000:2002::/64

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 8000:8001::1/128

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 9000:9001::1/128

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 fe00::/102

Metric: 0           Ucast-IPv6 999:999::/64

samedi.02-00*          0xcad      0x13bc     1184       0/0     55

Metric: 0           IS samedi.00

Metric: 0           IS m5-4.00


Total IS-IS LSP(s) for tag 1 in Level-2:   3

1.60   show isis debug-setting

show isis [instance-name] debug-setting

1.60.1   Purpose

Displays all enabled debugging settings.

1.60.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.60.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) instance name. Displays only debug setting information for the specified instance.

1.60.4   Default

When entered without specifying an IS-IS instance, this command displays debug settings for all configured IS-IS instances. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

1.60.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis debug-setting command to display all enabled debugging settings.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

1.60.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis debug-setting command:

[local]Redback>show isis debug-setting
debug isis adjacency

debug isis policy 

debug isis protocol-errors

debug isis routes

debug isis spf-events

1.61   show isis dynamic-hostname

show isis [instance-name] dynamic-hostname

1.61.1   Purpose

Displays Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) dynamic hostname and system ID mapping.

1.61.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.61.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays dynamic hostname and system ID mapping information for the only specified instance.

1.61.4   Default

When entered without specifying an IS-IS instance, this command displays dynamic hostname and system ID mapping information for all configured IS-IS instances.

1.61.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis dynamic-hostname command to display IS-IS dynamic hostname and system ID mapping. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI.

Table 11 describes the output fields for the show isis dynamic-hostname command.

Table 11    Field Descriptions for the show isis dynamic-hostname Command

Field

Description

System ID

A 6-byte value that identifies an IS-IS system in the domain. The plus (+) symbol denotes the locally defined mapping.

Level

The level of the IS-IS routing domain.

Updated

The last time the dynamic hostname type-length-value (TLV) was presented in a link-state protocol data unit (LSP) of the system.

Hostname

The symbolic name advertised by the system.

1.61.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis dynamic-hostname command:

[local]Redback>show isis dynamic-hostname
System ID             Level   Updated        Hostname

02aa.0002.0002        2       00:00:14       nyc-border3

02aa.0a00.0001+       2       00:00:22       wtn-core1



Total IS-IS Dynamic Hostname entries: 2

1.62   show isis interfaces

show isis [instance-name] [multicast] interfaces [if-name] [intercontext [group-id]] [all] [detail] [extensive]

1.62.1   Purpose

Displays information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) interfaces.

1.62.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.62.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays information about interfaces for only the specified instance.

multicast

Optional. Displays multitopology IS-IS (M-ISIS) information.

if-name

Optional. Interface name. Displays information only for the specified interface.

intercontext

Optional. Displays IS-IS intercontext interfaces.

group-id

Optional. Group ID. If the group-id argument is specified, then only the IS-IS intercontext interfaces that belong to the intercontext group ID are displayed.

all

Optional. Displays IS-IS interface information for all contexts.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed IS-IS interface information.

extensive

Optional. Displays information about Label Distribution Protocol (LDP)-Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) synchronization states.

1.62.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified.

1.62.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis interfaces command to display information about IS-IS interfaces.

The states displayed for LDP-IGP synchronization are as follows:

The display may show more than one state line.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Table 12 describes the output fields for the show isis interface command.

Table 12    Field Descriptions for the show isis interface Command

Field

Description

Interface

Interface advertising the IS-IS.

L

Level 1 routing only (1), level 2 routing only (2), or levels 1 and 2 (3) routing.

MT

Multi-topology. Indicates whether each IS-IS instance performs unicast (U), multicast (M), or unicast and multicast (UM) topology-based routing. Displays no value when the default routing topology, unicast, is used.

State

IS-IS adjacency state.

Level-1-DR

IS-IS level 1 designated router (DR) for the interface.

Level-2-DR

IS-IS level 1 designated router (DR) for the interface.

Metric

Routing metric. A value inside the brackets is a multicast metric, and a value without brackets, or outside the brackets, is a unicast metric.

1.62.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis interfaces command:

[local]Redback>show isis interfaces

IS-IS interface(s) for tag testbed:

Interface    L   MT  State  Level-1-DR        Level-2-DR         Metric

lo           3       Up     passive                              1

to-foo-10/   1p  UM  Up     up                                   10

to_dopey_1   3p      Up                                          10

to_dopey_4   3p      Up                       up                 10

to_pc6_7/2   3   UM  Up     sierra.01         sierra.01          10

to_pc7_7/2   3       Up     sierra.02         sierra.02          10

The following example displays output from the show isis interfaces detail command:

[local]Redback>show isis interfaces detail

IS-IS interface(s) for tag 1:

p2p

Up, level: 3, Ckt Id: 2, p2p, Ucast IP address: 13.13.13.2/24

mtu: 1500, speed 100000, Grid: 0x10000003, nh-id: 3, ckt 10/11

metrics[L1/L2]: v4 ucast[10/10]

GR Normal

Level Adjs Priority Hello Hold Auth Blocked Metric 

3 1 64 2 30 10

Total IS-IS Interface(s): 2

The following example displays the IS-IS inter-context interfaces with group 30 in all contexts. The greater than symbol (>) indicates that the interface is an intercontext type:

[local]Redback>show isis int intercontext 30 all
Context   :local                          Context id  : 0x40080001
------------------------------------------------------------------
IS-IS interface(s) for tag test:
Interface    L   MT  State  Level-1-DR        Level-2-DR         Metric
blue         2 >     Up                       foo-target1.01     10

Total IS-IS Interface(s):   1

Context   :foo                            Context id  : 0x40080002
------------------------------------------------------------------
IS-IS interface(s) for tag testfoo:
Interface    L   MT  State  Level-1-DR        Level-2-DR         Metric
bluefoo      2 >     Up                       foo-target1.01     10

Total IS-IS Interface(s):   1

1.63   show isis protocol-summary

show isis [instance-name] protocol-summary [l1 | l2 | level-1 | level-2]

1.63.1   Purpose

Displays Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) protocol summary information.

1.63.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.63.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays protocol summary information for only the specified instance.

l1

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 1 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

l2

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 2 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

level-1

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 1 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

level-2

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 2 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

1.63.4   Default

Provides protocol summary information for all IS-IS instances on all levels.

1.63.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis protocol-summary command to display IS-IS protocol summary information.

An autonomous system (AS) running IS-IS can be partitioned into multiple level 1 areas and a level 2 subset that interconnects all of the level 1 areas. Within each level 1 area, all routers exchange link-state information. Level 2 routers also exchange level 2 link-state information to compute routes between areas. You can use the l1 or level-1 keyword to show only level 1 information, or you can use the l2 or level-2 keyword to show only level 2 information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

1.63.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis protocol-summary command for the ip-trans IS-IS instance on the dynamic host (router), opt-core2:

[local]Redback>show isis ip-trans protocol-summary
  --- ISIS Instance: ip-trans / systemID: 1010.1010.c1c1(opt-core2) ---



Area  21.2425.2627.2829.3031.3233, level-1-2, metric short-wide, distance 115

Lsp   L1 total 14, pnode 7. local lsp total 1, pnode 0

      L2 total 26, pnode 10. local lsp total 2, pnode 0

Route isis total 104. level-1 87, level-2 17, interface route 23

      L2 redist route 0, leak route 87, summary route 0

SPF   L1 holddown 10, interval 5

         last time 00:01:25, duration 4, nodes 14, routes 87

      L2 holddown 10, interval 5

         last time 00:01:13, duration 10, nodes 21, routes 17

Adj   total 62, L1-LAN 20, L2-LAN 24, p2p 18

      last uptime 00:02:29, on intf to-edge1, neighbor 1010.1010.d1d1(opt-edge1)

Intf  total 24(down 1), LAN 4, p2p 20(down 1), passive 2

Time  router uptime 01d16h07, instance uptime 00:32:07

The previous example shows that the router has the following characteristics:

The router runs level 1 and level 2 with both short and wide metric style.

The router has 14 level 1 link-state protocol data units (LSPs), and 26 level 2 LSPs.

The router has 104 IS-IS routes: 87 level 1 routes and 17 level 2 routes.

87 routes are leaked from level 1 into level 2 without summary information.

The last Shortest Path First (SPF) calculation on level 1 was run one minute 25 seconds ago, with a duration of 4 milliseconds.

There are 14 nodes in the level 1 area.

The last level 2 SPF duration was 10 milliseconds, with 21 nodes and 17 routes.

The router has 62 adjacencies: 20 level 1 LAN adjacencies, 24 level 2 LAN adjacencies, and 18 point-to-point adjacencies. 

The last “UP” adjacency was 2 minutes and 29 seconds ago on the interface named to-edge1 from neighbor opt-edge1.

The router has 24 IS-IS interfaces: 4 LAN interfaces and 20 point-to-point interfaces.

The router has been up for 1 day 16 hours 7 minutes, and the IS-IS instance has been up for 32 minutes 7 seconds.

The following example displays output from the show isis protocol-summary command for the new-net IS-IS instance on the dynamic host (router), opt-core2:

[local]Redback>show isis new-net protocol-summary
  --- ISIS Instance: new-net / systemID: 0008.0008.0008(opt-core2) ---



Area  47.0008, level-1-2, metric wide-only, distance 115

Lsp   L1 total 1, pnode 0. local lsp total 1, pnode 0

      L2 total 4, pnode 1. local lsp total 2, pnode 1

Route isis total 4. level-1 1, level-2 3, interface route 1

      L2 redist route 0, leak route 1, summary route 0

SPF   L1 holddown 4, interval 2

         last time 00:02:14(periodic), duration 0, nodes 1, routes 1

      L2 holddown 4, interval 2

         last time 00:01:14(periodic), duration 0, nodes 3, routes 3

Adj   total 1, L1-LAN 0, L2-LAN 1, p2p 0

      last uptime 01d10h10, on intf to-e2, neighbor 1111.2222.3333(vpn-e2)

Intf  total 1, LAN 1, p2p 0  

GR Enabled

Time  router uptime 11d03h12, instance uptime 12:42:22

This example shows that the router has the following characteristics:

The router runs level 1 and level 2 with wide metric style only.

The router has one level 1 LSP and four level 2 LSPs.

The router has four IS-IS routes.

The last level 1 SPF calculation was run two minutes and 14 seconds ago and was a periodic SPF.

The last level 2 SPF calculation was run one minute and 14 seconds ago and was a periodic SPF.

The router has one level 2 LAN adjacency that was up one day and 10 hours ago on interface to-e2 with neighbor vpn-e2.

The router has only one IS-IS interface on LAN.

The router has IS-IS graceful restart enabled.

The router has been up for 11 days 3 hours 12 minutes, and the IS-IS instance has been up for 12 hours 42 minutes 22 seconds.

1.64   show isis routes

show isis [instance-name] [ipv4 {unicast | multicast} | ipv6 unicast] routes [[l1 | l2 | level-1 | level-2] | ip-addr | ip-addr/prefix-length | redistribute [l1 | l2 | level-1 | level-2] | summary]

1.64.1   Purpose

Displays Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) routes.

1.64.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.64.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays information about routes for only the specified instance.

ipv4

Optional. Displays information about IP Version 4 (IPv4) routes.

unicast

Optional. Displays information about unicast routes.

multicast

Optional. Displays information about multicast routes. Not available with the ipv6 keyword.

ipv6

Optional. Displays information about IP Version 6 (IPv6) routes.

l1

Optional. When used with the routes keyword, displays only IS-IS level 1 routes. When used with the redistribute keyword, displays only IS-IS level 1 routes redistributed from other routing protocols into the IS-IS domain, or leaked from other IS-IS levels.

l2

Optional. When used with the routes keyword, displays only IS-IS level 2 routes. When used with the redistribute keyword, displays only IS-IS level 2 routes redistributed from other routing protocols into the IS-IS domain, or leaked from other IS-IS levels.

level-1

Optional. When used with the routes keyword, displays only IS-IS level 1 routes. When used with the redistribute keyword, displays only IS-IS level 1 routes redistributed from other routing protocols into the IS-IS domain, or leaked from other IS-IS levels.

level-2

Optional. When used with the routes keyword, displays only IS-IS level 2 routes. When used with the redistribute keyword, displays only IS-IS level 2 routes redistributed from other routing protocols into the IS-IS domain, or leaked from other IS-IS levels.

ip-addr

Optional. Longest matched IS-IS route for the IP address. The IP address is specified in the form A.B.C.D.

ip-addr/prefix-length

Prefix length. Exactly matched IS-IS route for the IP address and prefix length. The IP address is specified in the form A.B.C.D. The range of values for the prefix length is 0 to 32.

redistribute

Optional. Displays IS-IS routes redistributed from other routing protocols into the IS-IS domain, or leaked from other IS-IS levels.

summary

Optional. Displays the number of routes that are summarized.

1.64.4   Default

Provides summary information about all IPv4 unicast routes if no options are specified.

1.64.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis routes command to display IS-IS routes. If entered without any optional keywords, this command displays IPv4 unicast routes only.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Table 13 describes the output fields for the show isis routes command using the ip-addr/prefix-length construct.

Table 13    Field Descriptions for the show isis routes Command

Field

Description

Prefix

IP prefix.

Level

IS-IS level.

Metric

Metric used to reach this prefix.

Interface

Interface used to reach this prefix.

Nexthop

IP nexthop used to reach this prefix.

LSP ID

Link state protocol data unit (LSP) ID that advertised this prefix.

Seq #

Sequence number of the LSP.

System Name

Router that advertised the LSP and prefix.

Arrive

Last time the system received this LSP.

Interface

Interface from which the last LSP arrived.

Table 14 describes the output fields for the show isis routes summary command.

Table 14    Field Descriptions for the show isis routes summary Command

Field

Description

Route Type

Route type. The route type can be IS-IS, redistributed, interarea, or summary.

Level-1

Number of routes, per route type, in level 1 area.

Level-2

Number of routes, per route type, in level 2 domain.

Summarize (L1/L2)

Number of routes, per route type, that are summarized in each level. The x/y output (for example, 0/1) indicates number of routes summarized in Level 1/ number of routes summarized in Level 2.

L2-to-L1 Leak

Number of IS-IS routes distributed from level 2 to level 1. These routes are not leaded on this system, but are leaked from level 2 into level 1 from other systems.

1.64.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis routes command:

[local]Redback>show isis routes
IS-IS IP route(s) for tag 1

Prefix               L  Metric     Interface          Nexthop           Context

1.1.1.1/32           1  1          lo1                0.0.0.0

9.9.9.0/24           2  0                             0.0.0.0

10.14.200.10/32      2  63         2                  11.1.1.1

11.1.0.0/16          2  63                            0.0.0.0

12.1.0.0/16          1  10         to_vendridi        0.0.0.0

13.1.0.0/16          1  10         ix                 0.0.0.0

99.99.1.0/24         2  0                             0.0.0.0

99.99.2.0/24         2  0                             0.0.0.0

99.99.3.0/24         2  0                             0.0.0.0

99.99.4.0/24         2  0                             0.0.0.0

99.99.5.0/24         2  0                             0.0.0.0

99.99.6.0/24         2  0                             0.0.0.0

99.99.99.0/24        2  0                             0.0.0.0



Total IS-IS Route(s) for tag 1:    13

The following example displays output from the show isis ipv6 unicast routes command:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#show isis ipv6 unicast routes


IS-IS ipv6 IP route(s) for tag 1

Prefix               L  Metric     Interface          Nexthop           Context

50:1:1::/64          2  1999       2                  fe80::290:69ff:

123:123::/64         2  1999       2                  fe80::290:69ff:

555:555::/100        2  0                             ::

666:666::/100        2  0                             ::

777:777::/100        2  0                             ::

888:888::/100        2  0                             ::

999:999::/64         2  0                             ::

2000:2001::/64       2  0                             ::

2000:2002::/64       1  0                             ::

8000:8001::1/128     2  1999       2                  fe80::290:69ff:

9000:9001::1/128     2  1999       2                  fe80::290:69ff:

fe00::/102           2  1999       2                  fe80::290:69ff:


Total IS-IS Route(s) for tag 1:    12

The following example displays output from the show isis ipv4 multicast routes command:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#show isis ipv4 multicast routes


IS-IS  multicast IP route(s) for tag 1

Prefix               L  Metric     Interface          Nexthop           Context

11.1.0.0/16          2  2000       2                  0.0.0.0


Total IS-IS Route(s) (multicast) for tag 1:     1

The following example displays output from the show isis routes redistribute command:

[local]Redback>show isis routes redistribute
IS-IS Redistributed route(s) for tag A2-wtn, on Level-2

Prefix          L  Type  Source    Metric  M-Type   Summarized

23.4.5.6/32     2  Ext   static    4       Int

44.1.1.0/24     2  Ext   static    4       Int



Total IS-IS Redistributed Routes in level-2:     2

The following example displays output from the show isis routes command using the ip-addr/prefix-length construct:

[local]Redback>show isis routes 11.11.11.4/30
IS-IS prefix for tag test:

Prefix               Level  Metric   Interface    Nexthop             

11.11.11.4/30        2      20       redback      192.168.1.5         

  Is sourced from LSP(s):

  LSP ID               Seq #      System Name     Arrive(ago)  Interface(from) 

  1111.2222.3333.00-01 0x4        ns-c1100        00:00:50     redback

The IP prefix 11.11.11.4/30 is a level 2 domain with a metric of 20. The next hop for this prefix is the redback interface and the IP address is 192.168.1.5. This prefix is advertised by system ns-c1100 in LSP 1111.2222.3333.00-01. This LSP has the sequence number of 0x4 and it arrived 50 seconds ago on the redback interface:

The following example displays output from the show isis routes command using the summary keyword:

[local]Redback>show isis routes summary
IS-IS route(s) summary for tag 1:

Route Type       Level-1   Level-2   Summarize(L1/L2)  L2-to-L1 Leak

IS-IS Route      3         10        -                 0

Redistribute     0         8         0/0

Inter-area       0         3         0/0

Summary Address  0         0         0/0


IS-IS interface routes: 3

Redistributed protocols: ospf static static

1.65   show isis spf-log

show isis [instance-name] [ipv4 {unicast | multicast} | ipv6 unicast] spf-log [l1 | l2 | level-1 | level-2]

1.65.1   Purpose

Displays a history of the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) Shortest Path First (SPF) calculation results.

1.65.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.65.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays SPF information for only the specified instance.

ipv4

Optional. Displays the SPF events for IP Version 4 (IPv4) routing.

unicast

Optional. Displays the SPF events for unicast topologies.

multicast

Optional. Displays the SPF events for multicast topologies. Not available with the ipv6 keyword.

ipv6

Optional. Displays the SPF events for IP Version 6 (IPv6) routing.

l1

Optional. Displays the SPF events for level 1 only.

l2

Optional. Displays the SPF events for level 2 only.

level-1

Optional. Displays the SPF events for level 1 only.

level-2

Optional. Displays the SPF events for level 2 only.

1.65.4   Default

Provides summary information about IS-IS SPF calculation results for both levels and all configured instances of IS-IS.

1.65.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis spf-log command to display a history of the IS-IS SPF calculation results.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Table 15 describes the output fields for the show isis spf-log command.

Table 15    Field Descriptions for the show isis spf-log Command

Field

Description

When

Time elapsed since the last SPF calculation took place.

Duration

Duration, in milliseconds, of an SPF calculation.

Nodes

Number of nodes involved in an SPF calculation.

Count

Number of times an SPF calculation was initiated.

Routes

Number of routes involved in an SPF calculation.

Last Trigger LSP

LSP ID that initiated the last SPF calculation.

Reasons

Reason for the last SPF calculation; see Table 16 for a list of explanations.

Table 16 describes the reasons and explanations for the show isis spf-log SPF recalculation.

Table 16    SPF Recalculation Reasons and Explanations

Reason ID

Explanation

ADMINDIST

The administrative distance was reconfigured.

AREASET

A set of areas was changed.

ATTACHFLAG

A Level 2 attachment has changed.

DISELECT

Designated IS (DIS) election was rerun.

IPRTLEAK

Routes were leaked between levels.

LOSTADJ

Adjacency has been lost.

LSPHEADER

An LSP header has changed.

NEWADJ

A new neighbor has come up.

NEWAREA

A new area has come up.

NEWLSP

A new LSP has arrived.

NEWMETRIC

A metric has changed.

OVLD

Overload.

PERIODIC REDIST

An internal LSP has been regenerated.

PREFIX

An SPF prefix has changed.

PURGELSP

An LSP was purged.

REDIST

A route was redistributed.

RTCLEARED

Routes were manually cleared.

TLVCONTENT

The content of an LSP changed.

TLVROUTES

An LSP route changed.

ADJNEXTHOP

A new next hop was added.

USERTRIG

The SPD recalculation was triggered by the user.

TOPOCHG

The network topology changed.

SYSCHG

The system ID changed.

1.65.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis spf-log command:

[local]Redback>show isis spf-log

IS-IS tag 1 level 1 SPF ipv4(unicast)log:
When          Duration  Nodes  Count  Routes Last Trigger LSP   Reasons
00:08:55.327  1         1      1      0      Re-1.00-00         PERIODIC 
(92)
22:35:47.653  0         1      2      0      Re-1.00-00         REDIST
22:36:02.734  0         1      1      0      Re-1.00-00         ATTACHFLAG
22:36:12.735  0         1      7      0      Re-1.00-00         NEWAREA
                                                                NEWLSP
                                                                PREFIX
                                                                SYSCHG
                                                                REDIST

IS-IS tag 1 level 2 SPF ipv4(unicast)log:
When          Duration  Nodes  Count  Routes Last Trigger LSP   Reasons
00:10:35.379  0         1      1      1      Re-1.00-00         PERIODIC 
(92)
22:36:12.763  1         1      8      1      Re-1.00-00         NEWAREA
                                                                NEWLSP
                                                                PREFIX
                                                                SYSCHG
                                                                REDIST

1.66   show isis statistics

show isis [instance-name] statistics [detail]

1.66.1   Purpose

Displays Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) traffic information.

1.66.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.66.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays traffic information for only the specified instance.

detail

Optional. Displays detailed traffic information.

1.66.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified.

1.66.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis statistics command to display IS-IS traffic information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

1.66.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis statistics command:

[local]Redback>show isis statistics
IS-IS Router: ip-backbone

System Id: 0003.0003.0003        Type: Level-1    SPF runs: 16

PDU Type      Received      Processed    Drops       Sent

LSP           25            18           7           16

IIH           1290          1216         74          721

CSNP          17            0            17          442

PSNP          0             0            0           0

Total         1332          1234         98          1179

                                 Type: Level-2   SPF runs: 16

PDU Type      Received      Processed    Drops       Sent

LSP           10            10           0           18

IIH           629           629          0           726

CSNP          0             0            0           453

PSNP          0             0            0           0

Total         639           639          0           1197



Total Received: 1971; Total Sent: 2376

1.67   show isis summary-address

show isis [instance-name] [{ipv4 {unicast | multicast} | ipv6 unicast}] summary-address [l1 | l2 | level-1 | level-2]

1.67.1   Purpose

Displays information about Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) IP summary addresses.

1.67.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.67.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays information about summary addresses for only the specified instance.

ipv4

Optional. Displays information for IP Version 4 (IPv4) summary addresses.

unicast

Optional. Displays information for unicast summary addresses.

multicast

Optional. Displays information for multicast summary addresses.

ipv6 unicast

Optional. Displays information for IP Version 6 (IPv6) unicast summary addresses.

l1

Optional. Displays only information about level 1 summary addresses.

l2

Optional. Displays only information about level 2 summary addresses.

level-1

Optional. Displays only information about level 1 summary addresses.

level-2

Optional. Displays only information about level 2 summary addresses.

1.67.4   Default

Provides summary information if no options are specified.

1.67.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis summary-address command to display information about IS-IS IP summary addresses.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Table 17 describes the output fields for the show isis summary-address command.

Table 17    Field Descriptions for the show isis summary-address Command

Field

Description

Prefix

Summary address.

Level

IS-IS level to which the summary address is applied.

Metric

Metric used for the summary address.

Num-Routes

Number of more-specific routes that are suppressed by the summary address.

Active

Status flag that indicates whether the summary address is being used.

1.67.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis summary-address command. In level 2, two summary addresses are displayed. The summary address 64.0.0.0/16 is not active. The summary address 44.1.0.0/23 is active and one route has an IS-IS metric of 3:

[local]Redback>show isis summary-address
Total IS-IS Summary Addresses in level-1: 0

IS-IS Summary Addresses, on Level-2

Prefix             Level     Metric     Num-Routes   Active

64.0.0.0/16         2                    0            

44.1.0.0/23         2         3          1            Y



Total IS-IS-Summary Addresses in Level 2: 2

1.68   show isis topology

show isis [instance-name] [{ipv4 {unicast | multicast} | ipv6 unicast}] topology [l1 | l2 | level-1 | level-2]

1.68.1   Purpose

Displays the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) topology information.

1.68.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.68.3   Syntax Description

instance-name

Optional. IS-IS instance name. Displays topology information for only the specified instance.

ipv4

Optional. Displays information for IP Version 4 (IPv4) topologies.

unicast

Optional. Displays information for unicast topologies.

multicast

Optional. Displays information for multicast topologies. Not available with the ipv6 keyword.

ipv6 unicast

Optional. Displays information for IP Version 6 (IPv6) unicast topologies.

l1

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 1 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

l2

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 2 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

level-1

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 1 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

level-2

Optional. Displays only IS-IS level 2 protocol summary information; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for more information on IS-IS levels.

1.68.4   Default

None

1.68.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isis topology command to display IS-IS topology information.

An autonomous system (AS) running IS-IS can be partitioned into multiple level 1 areas, and a level 2 subset that interconnects all of the level 1 areas. Within each level 1 area, all routers exchange link-state information. Level 2 routers also exchange level 2 link-state information to compute routes between areas. You can use the l1 or level-1 keyword to show only level 1 information, or you can use the l2 or level-2 keyword to show only level 2 information.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see “Modifying Output of show Commands” in the document, Using the CLI. For information about troubleshooting IS-IS, see Troubleshooting IS-IS.

Table 18 describes the output fields for the show isis topology command.

Table 18    Field Descriptions for the show isis topology Command

Field

Description

System

System ID or dynamic hostname.

Distance

IS-IS metric to reach the system.

Routes

Number of IP prefixes advertised by the system.

IS

Number of IS neighbors advertised by the system.

Next-Hop

Next-hop router to reach the system.

Interface

Interface used to reach the system.

IP-Gateway

IP next-hop address used to reach the system.

1.68.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isis topology command:

[local]Redback>show isis topology
IS-IS ipv4 unicast topology for tag 1:

System         Distance Route     IS  Next-Hop       Interface IP-Gateway

samedi         0        6         0


Total level-1 IS-IS systems:   1


IS-IS ipv4 unicast topology for tag 1:

System         Distance Route     IS  Next-Hop       Interface IP-Gateway

m5-4           63       2         0   m5-4           2         11.1.1.1

samedi         0        17        1


Total level-2 IS-IS systems:   2

The following example displays output from the show isis topology command with the ipv4 keyword:

[local]Redback>show isis ipv4 unicast topology
IS-IS ipv4 unicast topology for tag 6:

System         Distance Route     IS  Next-Hop       Interface IP-Gateway

dtse           20       3         2   dtse           5         5.5.5.1

sierra         30       4         0   dtse           5         5.5.5.1

samedi         0        2         1


Total level-1 IS-IS systems:   3

1.69   show isp-log

show isp-log

1.69.1   Purpose

Displays the contents of the ISP log file.

1.69.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.69.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.69.4   Default

None

1.69.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isp-log command to display the contents of the ISP log file.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.69.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isp-log command:

[local]Redback>show isp-log
16Dec21:10:002009user1;Upgrade;System;2010-01-25 19:32:22 UTC;Regular,
 6.3.1.1;Manual;3419857;
16Dec21:10:002009user1;Node_down;system;2010-01-25 19:32:24 UTC;;Manual;
3419858;
6.3.1.1;Node_up;system;2010-01-25 19:34:36 UTC;;Manual;119;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:34:54 UTC;System1;Manual;138;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:34:57 UTC;System2;Manual;141;
6.3.1.1;Proc_down;System;2010-01-25 19:36:38 UTC;System3;Manual;243;
6.3.1.1;Proc_up;System;2010-01-25 19:36:51 UTC;System3;Manual;256;
6.3.1.1;Linecard_down;System;2010-01-25 19:38:31 UTC;Slot 1, 
atm-oc3-4-port;Manual;356;
6.3.1.1;Linecard_up;System;2010-01-25 19:38:47 UTC;Slot 1, 
atm-oc3-4-port;Manual;371;
6.3.1.1;Cli_comment;CLI;2010-01-25 19:39:46 UTC;;Manual;431;This is an
 example comment from CLI;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:40:35 UTC;System4;Manual;479;
6.3.1.1;Proc_down;System;2010-01-25 19:40:44 UTC;System3;Manual;488;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:40:52 UTC;System2;Manual;496;
6.3.1.1;Proc_up;System;2010-01-25 19:40:56 UTC;System3;Manual;500;
6.3.1.1;Node_down;system;2010-01-25 19:41:20 UTC;;Manual;525;
6.3.1.1;Node_up;system;2010-01-25 19:43:31 UTC;;Manual;118;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:43:49 UTC;System1;Manual;137;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:43:51 UTC;System2;Manual;140;
[local]Redback#

1.70   show isp-log state

show isp-log state

1.70.1   Purpose

Displays information about the ISP log file.

1.70.2   Command Mode

all modes

1.70.3   Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

1.70.4   Default

None

1.70.5   Usage Guidelines

Use the show isp-log state keyword to display information about the ISP log, including whether the ISP log is enabled, the size of the file, and the size limit.

Note:  
By default, most show commands (in any mode) display information for the current context only or, depending on the command syntax, for all contexts. If you are an administrator for the local context, you can insert the optional context ctx-name construct, preceding the show command, to view output for the specified context without entering that context. For more information about using the context ctx-name construct, see the context command description.

Note:  
By appending a space followed by the pipe ( | ) character at the end of a show command, you can filter the output using a set of modifier keywords and arguments. For more information, see Modifying Output of show Commands in the document, Using the CLI.

1.70.6   Examples

The following example displays output from the show isp-log state command:

[local]Redback>show isp-log state
Displaying ISP states:
             ISP Logging                    : Enabled
             File Size                      : 1618 bytes
             File Limit                     : 4096 bytes
             Number of Entries              : 18
             File Full?                     : FALSE
             Percent Full                   : 39%