SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR GUIDE     82/1543-CRA 119 1170/1-V1 Uen C    

Logging

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Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List

SmartEdge  is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

Contents

1Logging
1.1About Logging
1.2How to Configure Logging
1.3Logging Operations Tasks

2

ISP Logging
2.1Configure ISP Log Size
2.2Perform Exec-Level Commands on the ISP Log
2.3Display the ISP Log and Log File Information


1   Logging

This document provides an overview of logging features, describes the tasks used to configure them, and provides configuration examples and detailed descriptions of the commands used to configure logging features using the SmartEdge router .

Note:  
In the following descriptions, the term controller card applies to the Cross-Connect Route Processor (XCRP4) Controller card, including the controller carrier card unless otherwise noted.

The term controller carrier card refers to the controller functions on the carrier card within the SmartEdge 100 chassis The term I/O carrier card refers to the traffic card functions on the carrier card; these functions are compatible with the similar functions that are implemented on the traffic card that are supported on all other SmartEdge routers.

The term chassis refers to any SmartEdge chassis; the term SmartEdge 800 chassis refers to any version of the SmartEdge 800 chassis. The term SmartEdge 1200 chassis refers to any version of the SmartEdge 1200 chassis.


1.1   About Logging

The operating system contains two log buffers: main and debug. By default, messages are stored in the main log. If the system restarts, for example as a result of a logging daemon or system error, and the logger daemon shuts down and restarts cleanly, the log buffers are saved to the /md/loggd_dlog.bin for the main log buffer, and the /md/loggd_ddbg.bin for the debug log buffer. You can view the contents of the main log files that are saved using the show log command (in any mode).

Note:  
The debug buffer is not fully supported in this release. You cannot use the show log command (in any mode) to display the contents of the debug buffer. To view all log messages, enable the logging debug command (in global configuration mode), so that the contents of the debug buffer can be displayed using the show log command (in exec mode). Be aware that enabling the logging debug command can quickly fill up the log buffer with debug and non debug messages. To prevent the main buffer from filling up with debug messages and overwriting other more significant messages, disable the logging debug command, (in context configuration mode).

By default, log messages for local contexts are displayed in real time on the console; non-local contexts are not displayed in real time on the console. To change this behavior, and display messages in real time, use the logging console command (in context configuration mode). However, log messages can be displayed in real time from any Telnet session using the terminal monitor command (in exec mode). For more information on the terminal monitor command, see Command List.

In large installations, it is convenient to have all systems log to a remote machine for centralized management and to save space on the device. The operating system uses the UNIX syslog facility for this purpose, and can send log messages to multiple machines concurrently. Logging can be constrained to events occurring on a specific circuit.

All log messages contain a numeric value indicating the severity of the event or condition that caused the message to be logged. Many log messages are normal and do not indicate a system problem.

Table 1 lists event severity levels in log messages and their respective descriptions.

Table 1    Event Severity Levels in Log Messages

Value

Severity Level

Description

0

emergencies

Panic condition—the system is unusable.

1

alerts

Immediate administrator intervention is required.

2

critical

Critical conditions have been detected.

3

errors

An error condition has occurred.

4

warnings

A potential problem exists.

5

notifications

Normal, but significant, events or conditions exist.

6

informational

Informational messages only; no problem exists.

7

debugging

Output from an enabled system debugging function.

1.2   How to Configure Logging

This section describes how to configure logging in several different scenarios.

1.2.1   Configure Optional Global Logging Features

To configure optional global logging features, perform the tasks described in Table 2; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 2    Configure Optional Global Logging Features

Task

Root Command

Notes

Enable the display of logged system event messages with a millisecond resolution timestamp.

logging timestamp millisecond

 

Enables the logger to send logging and debug messages from the active controller card to the standby controller card.

logging active

Enter the no form of this command to disable this feature.

Enables the filtering of debug messages for valid circuits only.

logging cct-valid

Enter this command in global configuration mode.

Enables the logger to send logging and debug messages from the standby controller card to the active controller card.

logging standby

Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

Enables the display of all debug messages in the main log buffer.

logging debug

Use the no form of this command to prevent the debug messages from being sent to the main log buffer.

1.2.2   Configure Optional Context-Specific Logging Features

To configure optional context-specific logging features, perform the tasks described in Table 3; enter all commands in context configuration mode, unless otherwise noted.

Table 3    Configure Optional Context-Specific Logging Features

Task

Root Command

Notes

Isolate events from certain facilities in the logs and trim the flow of information.

logging filter

 

Enable event logging messages to the console.

pim sparse-mode

 

Enable event logging messages to a file.

logging file

You can configure up to four log files per context.

Enable the logging of system events to a remote syslog server that is reachable within the current context.

logging syslog

You can configure up to four syslog servers per context.

The following example configures the system to remotely log all system messages to a network syslog server. Information to forward packets to the 10.1.1.1 address specified for the syslog host is derived from routing tables specific to the NewContext context:

[local]Redback(config)#context NewContext
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging syslog 10.1.1.1

The following example shows a configuration where log messages are sent to a syslog server (198.168.148.99) in the local context using the syslog facility, local6, and to another syslog server (198.168.145.99) in the green context using the syslog facility, local3:

[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging sys 198.168.148.99 facility local6
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#exit
[local]Redback(config)#context green
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#logging sys 198.168.145.99 facility local3

1.3   Logging Operations Tasks

Table 4 lists the logging operations tasks. Enter the show commands in any mode; enter all other commands in exec mode.

Table 4    Logging Operations Tasks

Task

Root Command

Clear the system event log buffer.

clear log

Clear the contents of the nonvolatile memory (NVRAM) on the active controller card to which you are connected.

clear system nvlog

Enable the generation of debugging messages for the logging facility (logger).

debug logger

Enable the generation of debugging messages for the logging facility (logger) RCM.

debug logger-rcm

Saves one of the internal event log buffers to the flash file system.

save log

Display information about system event logs or a previously saved log file.

show logging

Display statistics about the system logger, including logger uptime, number of logged messages, number of logged filter messages, and number of logged rate-limited messages.

show logging

Display the contents of the NVRAM on the active controller card to which you are connected.

show system nvlog

Note:  
Lawful intercept (LI) messages are visible only to LI administrators and users.

2   ISP Logging

The in-service performance (ISP) log is a file stored in the flash memory of the SmartEdge router . It collects information about predefined system events that can have a potential impact on applications and enable support representatives to perform root-cause analysis and troubleshooting on the SmartEdge router . You can view the ISP log in the CLI by using the show isp-log command, or you can extract the ISP log from /flash/.isp.log by using the copy command. The ISP log is persistent across switchovers and reboots.

When the ISP log file reaches the size limit you set with the isp-log size command, the system stops writing ISP log entries in the file, logs an entry in the ISP file stating that the file is full, and displays the following system error messages:

To resume logging entries in the ISP log file, you must either:

If you disable the ISP log or change the size limit, the system removes any existing ISP log file. To save an existing ISP log file before disabling ISP logging, use the copy command to extract the file from the system.

You can use the information in the ISP log to manually compute system downtime and other statistics or, in the event of an issue, you can send the extracted file to your support representative for analysis.

The ISP log tracks and displays the following information:

2.1   Configure ISP Log Size

To configure the ISP log size, enter the isp-log size command in global configuration mode.

When the ISP log file reaches the size limit you set, the system stops writing ISP log entries in the file, logs an entry in the ISP file stating that the file is full, and displays a system error message.

2.2   Perform Exec-Level Commands on the ISP Log

To perform exec-level commands on the ISP log, perform the tasks described in Table 5; enter all commands in exec mode.

Table 5    Configure ISP Logging Features

Task

Root Command

Notes

Enable ISP logging.

isp-log

Enter the no form of this command to disable this feature.

Add a comment to the ISP log file.

isp-log add

 

Clear the ISP log file

clear isp-log

 

Extract the ISP log file

copy

Use the clear keyword with this command to clear the ISP log file after extraction.

2.3   Display the ISP Log and Log File Information

Table 6 lists the commands to display the ISP log and log file information. Enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 6    Perform ISP Logging Operations

Task

Root Command

Display the ISP log file

show isp-log

Display ISP log state information

show isp-log state

2.3.1   Event Types

When you view the ISP log using the show isp-log command or by viewing a file extracted using the copy command, the log displays a number of event types. Table 7 identifies the event type terms, their descriptions, and additional event information displayed in the ISP log file.

Table 7    Event Types and Information

Event Type

Description

Event Information

node_down

The router went down.

N/A

node_up

The router came up. During a system reboot, process-up and card-up events are logged on each of the processes and line cards that come up. A single node_up event is logged.

N/A

proc_down

A process went down

Process name and instance ID

proc_up

A process came up.

Process name and instance ID

linecard_down

A line card went down.

Slot number and card type

linecard_up

A line card came up.

Slot number and card type

switchover

A switchover occurred.

Reason for switchover (for example, "User requested manual switch")

upgrade

A regular or patch upgrade was performed.

Type of upgrade

heartbeat

Application heartbeat event.

N/A

log_full

The ISP log file reached the maximum file size.

Displays the text, "Max file size reached"

cli_comment

A comment made using the CLI command isp-log add comment command.

N/A

hostname

The new hostname string.

The new hostname string. Each system should be configured with a unique hostname in order to correlate events to a specific host.

2.3.2   Example: Displaying an ISP Log file

The following is an example of the ISP log file, displayed in the CLI:

[local]Redback>show isp-log
16Dec21:10:002009user1;Upgrade;System;2010-01-25 19:32:22 UTC;Regular,
 6.3.1.1;Manual;3419857;
16Dec21:10:002009user1;Node_down;system;2010-01-25 19:32:24 UTC;;Manual;
3419858;
6.3.1.1;Node_up;system;2010-01-25 19:34:36 UTC;;Manual;119;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:34:54 UTC;System1;Manual;138;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:34:57 UTC;System2;Manual;141;
6.3.1.1;Proc_down;System;2010-01-25 19:36:38 UTC;System3;Manual;243;
6.3.1.1;Proc_up;System;2010-01-25 19:36:51 UTC;System3;Manual;256;
6.3.1.1;Linecard_down;System;2010-01-25 19:38:31 UTC;Slot 1, atm-oc3-4-port;
Manual;356;
6.3.1.1;Linecard_up;System;2010-01-25 19:38:47 UTC;Slot 1, atm-oc3-4-port;
Manual;371;
6.3.1.1;Cli_comment;CLI;2010-01-25 19:39:46 UTC;;Manual;431;This is an
 example comment from CLI;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:40:35 UTC;System4;Manual;479;
6.3.1.1;Proc_down;System;2010-01-25 19:40:44 UTC;System3;Manual;488;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:40:52 UTC;System2;Manual;496;
6.3.1.1;Proc_up;System;2010-01-25 19:40:56 UTC;System3;Manual;500;
6.3.1.1;Node_down;system;2010-01-25 19:41:20 UTC;;Manual;525;
6.3.1.1;Node_up;system;2010-01-25 19:43:31 UTC;;Manual;118;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:43:49 UTC;System1;Manual;137;
6.3.1.1;Hostname;System;2010-01-25 19:43:51 UTC;System2;Manual;140;
[local]Redback#

The following is an ISP log entry example:

6.3.1.1;Linecard_down;System;2010-01-25 19:38:31 UTC;Slot 1,
 atm-oc3-4-port;Manual;356;

Table 8 describes the information in the ISP log entry example.

Table 8    ISP Log Entry Example Definition

Example Entry

ISP Log information

Linecard_down

Event type

System

Application name

2010-01-25 19:38:31 UTC

Event time stamp

Slot 1, atm-oc3-4-port

Event information

Manual

Trigger Method

356

System Uptime

N/A

Comment