Configuring Circuits

Contents

1Overview
1.1802.1Q PVCs
1.2ATM Profiles, VPs, and PVCs
1.3Frame Relay Profiles and PVCs
1.4Terminology
1.5Related Information

2

Circuit Configuration and Operations
2.1Configuring 802.1Q PVCs
2.2Configuring ATM
2.3Configuring Frame Relay
2.4Circuit Operations
2.5802.1Q PVC Operations
2.6ATM Operations
2.7CLIPS Operations
2.8Frame Relay Operations
2.9Link Group Operations
2.10PPP and PPPoE Operations
2.11Circuit-Groups Operations

3

Configuration Examples
3.1802.1Q PVC Examples
3.2ATM Examples
3.3Frame Relay Examples
Copyright

© Ericsson AB 2009–2011. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List
SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

1   Overview

This document describes how to configure, monitor, and administer permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) on ports and aggregated link-group PVCs. Use of circuit-groups is also described.

The SmartEdge® router supports the following types of circuits and circuit-related features:

Note:  
Unless otherwise noted, the SmartEdge 100 router supports all commands described in this document.

Circuits are logical paths through a port, channel, or tunnel. This section provides overviews of PVCs on Ethernet, ATM, and Frame Relay networks:

Note:  
When IP Version 6 (IPv6) addresses are not referenced or explicitly specified, the term IP address can refer generally to IP Version 4 (IPv4) addresses, IPv6 addresses, or IP addressing. When IPv6 addresses are referenced or explicitly specified, the term IP address refers only to IPv4 addresses. For a description of IPv6 addressing and the types of IPv6 addresses, see RFC 3513, Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Addressing Architecture.

1.1   802.1Q PVCs

A VLAN is a separate, administratively defined, subgroup of a bridged LAN. Bridged LANs and 802.1Q encapsulation are described in the 802.1Q IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks specification, which defines an architecture and bridging protocols for the partitioning of a bridged LAN into VLANs.

In the SmartEdge router, an 802.1Q PVC that connects an 802.1Q VLAN to the SmartEdge router can be created on any 10/100 Fast Ethernet (FE), Gigabit Ethernet, or 10 Gigabit Ethernet port.

Note:  
The 802.1Q features do not apply to the Ethernet management port on the controller card.

The SmartEdge router supports 802.1Q encapsulation on Ethernet ports. When an 802.1Q frame is received on an 802.1Q PVC, the 802.1Q header is stripped from the packet. The Ethernet packet is then routed by the system. When an outbound packet is forwarded to an 802.1Q PVC, the SmartEdge router adds the appropriate 802.1Q header to the packet. This feature also allows for the channelization of Ethernet ports.

The types of 802.1Q PVCs and 802.1Q tunnels are discussed in the following sections:

1.1.1   On-Demand, CCOD, and Static 802.1Q PVCs

Two types of 802.1Q PVCs are supported—static and on-demand. A static PVC is created in main memory when it is configured, and is always considered active, even when there is no traffic on it. An on-demand PVC is also created when it is configured, but it becomes active only when user traffic is detected on it.

The process by which on-demand PVCs are created is called circuit creation on demand (CCOD).

On-demand PVCs have two modes—dormant (or listening) and active. When you configure a single on-demand PVC, or a range of on-demand PVCs, the dormant version of each PVC is created in listening mode; it does not occupy main memory.

When user traffic is detected on a dormant PVC, the PVC is created in active mode in main memory. When the traffic ceases (there are no subscriber sessions connected on it), the PVC is said to be inactive. After a configurable time interval, the inactive PVC is deleted from main memory and the dormant version is again in listening mode. In this way, on-demand PVCs conserve main memory.

You can assign a profile and specify the encapsulation for a range of on-demand PVCs when you configure them, or you can specify the authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) and RADIUS features to provide the profile and encapsulation.

An 802.1Q PVC can be configured as a tunnel, with static, on-demand, or both types of 802.1Q PVCs configured within it. Each 802.1Q PVC within the tunnel has an outer VLAN tag value, which is the tunnel’s VLAN tag value, and a unique inner VLAN tag value.

1.1.2   802.1Q Tunnels

Four types of 802.1Q tunnels are supported; they are identified from their 802.1Q headers: 8100, 88a8, 9100, and 9200. You can also specify a user-defined type. You can configure one or more tunnels on each port.

Because 802.1Q PVCs can carry multiple types of packets, IP over Ethernet (IPoE), Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE), and IPv6 over Ethernet (IPv6oE), the operating system supports the creation of child circuits to segregate PPPoE and IPv6oE packets. You can terminate these child circuits or cross-connect them just as you can terminate or cross-connect the 802.1Q PVCs on which you have configured them.

1.1.3   Aggregated 802.1Q PVCs and 802.1Q Tunnels in Link Groups

You can create aggregated 802.1Q PVCs and tunnels in access link groups. See the IEEE 802.3ad Link Groups for FE and GE Ports section in Configuring Link Aggregation for details.

1.1.4   Circuit Groups

Circuit groups allow you to group arbitrary PVCs or other circuits such as subscriber sessions for collective metering, policing, and scheduling. You can group PVCs—for example, to represent a business entity—and apply class-aware and circuit-level rate limits to the group. In this case, the traffic on all of the member circuits is collectively limited to any metering, policing, and scheduling rates configured on the circuit group.

Circuit group membership is available for 802.1Q PVCs, 802.1Q tunnels, or a mix of these circuit types. Circuit group membership is also available for subscriber circuits.

Circuit group members can have child circuits configured under them. The following apply to circuit group membership:

When a circuit with children is assigned circuit-group membership, those child circuits remain associated with their parent and are subject to QoS inheritance of any QoS policies applied to the circuit group or the member circuit itself. However, if the child circuit is itself assigned circuit-group membership, the QoS inheritance relationship with its parent circuit is broken and the child inherits from its own circuit group.

Counters values reported for the circuit group reflect the aggregate totals of all the members as well as their children.

Subscriber session circuits can be configured as direct members of a circuit group. You can configure the circuit-group-member command in the subscriber record, subscriber profile, or subscriber default configuration modes. In addition, a corresponding VSA (210, Circuit_Group_Member) is provided to allow configuration of circuit-group membership through RADIUS. The following apply to a subscriber session member of a circuit group:

For information about the circuit-group, circuit-group-member, and subscriber commands, see Command List. For information about VSA 210, see RADIUS Attributes.

The SmartEdge router also supports virtual port circuit groups (VPCGs). This circuit group allows you to organize circuits or link groups of ports that support PWFQ and have a line rate greater than 1 Gbps into multiple scheduling domains. For information about VPCGs, see Virtual Port Circuit Groups.

A circuit group can belong to another circuit group. For more information about these nested circuit groups, see Nested Circuit Groups.

1.2   ATM Profiles, VPs, and PVCs

ATM encapsulation is described in RFC 1483, Multiprotocol Encapsulation over ATM Adaptation Layer 5. ATM PVCs can be created on any ATM port.

Using ATM, data flows over PVCs on a virtual path (VP) on an ATM port. These PVCs are identified by a virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). After you have configured an ATM port, you can configure VPs and PVCs. ATM PVCs and shaped VPs are configured using ATM profiles. (A shaped VP is a VP created with the atm vp command in ATM OC configuration mode.)

Note:  
A PVC created on a shaped VP is sometimes referred to as a virtual circuit (VC). VC is used in the following descriptions only when it is necessary to distinguish it from a PVC configured on a nonshaped VP; otherwise, PVC is used throughout this document. A shaped VP is also referred to as a VP tunnel; the term VP tunnel is not used in this document.

For ATM PVCs configured on ports on second-generation ATM OC traffic cards, you can also create ATM VC tunnels by attaching a quality of service (QoS) ATM weighted fair queuing (ATMWFQ) policy to an ATM PVC.

An ATMWFQ policy allows you to define either two, four, or eight class of service (CoS) queues of packets on each ATM PVC. Each PVC then acts as a VC tunnel.

You can specify the queuing algorithm for the policy, and for each queue its congestion avoidance parameters, either weighted random early detection (RED) or early packet discard (EPD). For information about attaching QoS policies of any type, see Configuring Circuits for QoS.

The types of ATM profiles, ATM traffic management, and the types of ATM circuits are discussed in the following sections:

1.2.1   ATM Profiles

ATM profiles can be either static or dynamic (nonstatic):

Note:  
To dynamically assign a static or dynamic profile to an ATM PVC, either by using subscriber-specific RADIUS attributes at the time a subscriber session becomes active or by using the RADIUS Refresh function, you must have enabled the software license for dynamic services.

Every ATM profile has a default traffic class, unspecified bit rate (UBR) without any option, which is assigned to each shaped ATM VP or PVC that references that profile. Other supported traffic classes include constant bit rate (CBR), variable bit rate-real time (VBR-rt), VBR nonreal-time (VBR-nrt), and UBR extended (UBRe).

1.2.2   ATM Traffic Shaping and Scheduling

For ATM VPs and PVCs configured on first-generation ATM OC traffic cards, only one mode of traffic shaping and scheduling (the default mode) is supported by the segmentation and reassembly (SAR) image. However, second-generation ATM OC traffic cards support multiple modes. These modes are:

1.2.3   On-Demand, CCOD, and Static ATM PVCs

Two types of ATM PVCs are supported—explicitly configured (static) and on-demand. A static PVC is created in main memory when it is configured, and is always considered active, even when there is no traffic on it. An on-demand PVCs is also created when it is configured, but it becomes active only when user traffic is detected on it.

On-demand PVCs have two modes—dormant (or listening) and active. When you configure a single on-demand PVC or a range of on-demand PVCs, the dormant version of each PVC is created in listening mode; it does not occupy main memory.

The process by which on-demand PVCs is created is called circuit creation on demand (CCOD).

When user traffic is detected on a dormant PVC, the PVC is created in active mode in main memory. When the traffic ceases (there are no subscriber sessions connected on it), the PVC is said to be inactive. After a configurable time interval, the inactive PVC is deleted from main memory and the dormant version is again in listening mode. In this way, on-demand PVCs conserve main memory.

You can assign a profile and specify the encapsulation for a range of on-demand PVCs when you configure them, or you can specify that the AAA and RADIUS functions provide the profile and encapsulation type.

The ATM profile that AAA and RADIUS dynamically assign can be either a static or dynamic profile that you have created previously.

Note:  
To configure ATM VC tunnels or hierarchical shaping, or to enable AAA and RADIUS to assign a profile to an on-demand PVC at the time it becomes active, you must have enabled the software license for that feature.

1.3   Frame Relay Profiles and PVCs

Frame Relay encapsulation is described in RFC 1490, Multiprotocol Interconnect over Frame Relay and RFC 2115, Management Information Base for Frame Relay DTEs Using SMIv2. You can create Frame Relay PVCs on any Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) port, MFR link group, or DS-0 channel group.

1.4   Terminology

Note:  
An 802.1Q PVC is also referred to as an 802.1Q virtual LAN (VLAN); however, in this document, it is the PVC, not the VLAN, that is being configured.

In the following descriptions, the term controller card refers to any version of the Cross-Connect Route Processor (XCRP4) Controller card, including the controller carrier card, unless otherwise noted.

The term controller carrier card refers to the controller functions on the circuit board within the SmartEdge 100 chassis. The term I/O carrier card refers to the traffic card functions on the circuit board; these functions are compatible with the similar functions that are implemented on all SmartEdge 400 and SmartEdge 800 traffic cards.

The term chassis refers to any SmartEdge router; the term SmartEdge 800 refers to any version of the SmartEdge 800 chassis; the term SmartEdge 800s refers only to the SmartEdge 800s chassis

The term traffic card refers to a SmartEdge 100 media interface card (MIC) or an SmartEdge traffic card, unless otherwise noted.

The term Gigabit Ethernet refers to any Ethernet traffic card that supports a port speed of 1 Gbps or greater; unless explicitly stated, the speed of any Gigabit Ethernet port is 1 Gbps.

1.5   Related Information

Other documents with related tasks and commands include:

2   Circuit Configuration and Operations

2.1   Configuring 802.1Q PVCs

2.1.1   Configure an 802.1Q Profile

An 802.1Q profile is required to collect bulk statistics or set the priority bits for any 802.1Q PVC that uses the profile. To configure a profile for an 802.1Q PVC, perform the tasks described in Table 1.

Table 1    Configure an 802.1Q Profile

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Create an 802.1Q profile, or select an existing one for modification, and access dot1q profile configuration mode.

dot1q profile

Enter this command in global configuration mode.

2.

The following commands appear in dot1Q profile configuration mode:

 

Associate a description with the profile.

description (Dot1Q)

Enter these commands in dot1q profile configuration mode.

 

Apply an existing bulkstats schema profile.

bulkstats schema

 
 

Override the rates specified by QoS policies attached to a subscriber session or 802.1q VLAN with the rates learned from the neighbor peer (DSLAM) through ANCP, PPPoE, or DHCP TR-101 tags.

access-line rate

 
 

Set the PPPoE MRU value.

ppp mru

 
 

Configure the PPPoE Active Discovery Offer (PADO) delay value.

pppoe pado delay

 
 

Propagate QoS classification values

propagate qos from ethernet, propagate qos to ethernet, propagate qos transport use-vlan-header

 
 

Set the NAS port type.

radius attribute nas-port-type

 
 

Configure reporting speed TX/RX specific values.

report

 

2.1.2   Configure an 802.1Q PVC

To configure an 802.1Q PVC on any Ethernet port, except the Ethernet management port, perform the tasks described in Table 2.

Table 2    Configure an 802.1Q PVC

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Bind the Ethernet port to an existing interface in an existing context.

bind interface

Enter this command in port configuration mode to allow untagged traffic on the port.

2.

Specify 802.1Q encapsulation for the Ethernet port.

encapsulation (Ethernet Port)

Enter the encapsulation command with the dot1q keyword in port configuration mode.

3.

Create one or more 802.1Q PVCs and access dot1q PVC configuration mode.

dot1q pvc or dot1q pvc transport

Enter this command in port configuration mode. Use the on-demand keyword to create a range of 802.1Q PVCs that are made active only when needed.(1)

4.

Use Table 3 to set the optional parameters of the 802.Q PVC.

5.

Bind the 802.1Q PVC with one of the following commands. Unless otherwise stated, enter the following commands in link PVC configuration mode:

 

Create a static binding to an interface.

bind interface

This binding applies to single 802.1Q PVCs with IPoE encapsulation (default).


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the PVC.


You can bind to either an IP interface or a bridged interface. To create bridged 802.1Q PVCs, bind to a bridged interface.

 

Create a restricted or unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

This binding applies to single PVCs with PPPoE encapsulation.


You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.

 

Create a static binding through a subscriber record to an interface.

bind subscriber

This binding applies to single PVCs with:


  • IPoE encapsulation (default)

  • PPPoE encapsulation


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the PVC.

 

Automatically create static bindings through subscriber records to interfaces.

bind auto-subscriber

This binding applies to a range of PVCs created using the on-demand keyword and IPoE encapsulation (default).


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the PVC.

 

Bind the PVC to a bypass for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

This binding applies to single PVCs that are not bound to an interface or subscriber record or are created on-demand.


Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the PVC and have no child circuits on it.

6.

If you have created a child circuit, bind the child circuit with one of the following commands. Unless otherwise stated, enter the following command in dot1q child protocol configuration mode:

 

Create a static binding through a subscriber record to an interface

bind subscriber

This binding applies only to PPPoE child circuit encapsulation.


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the child circuit.

 

Create a restricted or unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

This binding applies only to PPPoE child circuit encapsulation.


You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the child circuit.

 

Bind the PVC to a bypass for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the child circuit.

7.

Disable an 802.1Q PVC (stop operations on it) until you are ready to begin operations on it.

shutdown (PVC)

Enter this command in dot1q PVC configuration mode. By default, all circuits are enabled (operational).

(1)  You cannot configure overlapping transport ranges (with the exception of the fallback transport range [keyword any]) or overlapping circuit creation-on demand (CCOD) ranges. In addition, overlapping transport and CCOD ranges are not allowed.


2.1.3   Configure the Optional Parameters of an 802.1Q PVC

To configure the optional parameters of an 802.1Q PVC on any Ethernet port, except the Ethernet management port, perform the tasks described in Table 3. Enter all commands in dot1q PVC configuration mode unless otherwise noted.

Table 3    Configure the Optional Parameters of an 802.1Q PVC

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Optional. Configure the access-line ID.

access-line access-node-id, access-line adjust, access-line agent-circuit-id, access-line rate,

 

2.

Optional. Specify the static MAC addresses.

bridge mac-entry

This command applies only when the 802.1Q PVC is bound to a bridged interface.


Enter this command for the MAC address of each station known to be on this bridge. The bridge dynamically learns the addresses of other stations as they connect to the bridge.(1)

3.

Optional. Assign a bridge profile.

bridge profile

This command applies only to bridged 802.1Q PVCs.


Supported only if the bridge is a tributary type. Not supported if the bridge is a trunk type.

4.

Optional. Create a child circuit on a multiprotocol-encapsulated PVC and access dot1q child protocol configuration mode.

circuit protocol

Enter this command only if you have encapsulated the PVC using the multi keyword in the dot1q pvc command.

5.

Create a binding for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the child circuit.

6.

Optional. Specify that the 802.1Q PVC is a member of the specified circuit group.

circuit-group-member

 

7.

Optional. Associate a description with the PVC.

description (Dot1Q)

 

8.

Optional. Specify the forward output or policy.

 

9.

Optional. Enable a watchdog timer for 802.1Q PVCs created on demand.

idle-down

This command applies only to 802.1Q PVCs created using the on-demand keyword.

10.

Optional. Specify IP ACL filters, if any.

ip access-group

 

11.

Optional. Associate the IP address of the remote host on the circuit.

ip host (PVC)

Perform this task only for a PVC that you intend to bind directly to an interface.


You cannot perform this task if you have created the PVC as part of a range of PVCs.

12.

Optional. Enable L2VPN bindings on this PVC.

l2vpn (ctx-name)

 

13.

Optional. Assign a medium access control (MAC) address to an 802.1Q PVC.

mac-address (Dot1Q PVC)

 

14.

Optional. Configure the QoS parameters of the 802.1Q PVC.

See the document, Configuring Circuits for QoS for use of the qos commands.

 

15.

Optional. Configure a different rate for a circuit that has a QoS metering, policing, modified deficit round-robin (MDRR), or priority weighted fair queuing (PWFQ) policy attached to it.

rate circuit

See Configuring Rate-Limiting and Class-Limiting.

16.

Optional. Enable clientless IP service selection (CLIPS).

service clips (static), service clips dhcp

 

16.

Optional. Assign a spanning-tree profile.

spanning-tree profile

This command applies only when bound to a bridged interface.

17.

Disable an 802.1Q PVC (stop operations on it) until you are ready to begin operations on it.

shutdown (PVC)

By default, all circuits are enabled (operational).

(1)  Not supported when the interface encapsulation is PPPoE or multibind.


2.1.4   Configure an 802.1Q Tunnel and the 802.1Q PVCs Within It

To configure an 802.1Q tunnel and any PVCs within the tunnel on any Ethernet port, except the Ethernet management port, perform the tasks described in Table 4.

Table 4    Configure an 802.1Q PVC Tunnel and the 802.1Q PVCs Within It

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Bind the Ethernet port to an existing interface in an existing context.

bind interface

Enter this command in port configuration mode to allow untagged traffic on the port.

2.

Specify 802.1Q encapsulation for the Ethernet port.

encapsulation (Ethernet Port)

Enter this command with the dot1q keyword in port configuration mode.

3.

Specify the tunnel type for this port.

dot1q tunnel

Enter this command in port configuration mode.

4.

Create an 802.1Q tunnel and access dot1q PVC configuration mode.

dot1q pvc or dot1q pvc transport

Enter this command in port configuration mode. Specify the encapsulation with the 1qtunnel keyword.

5.

Associate a description with the tunnel (optional).

description (Dot1Q)

Enter this command in dot1q PVC configuration mode.

6.

Bind the 802.1Q PVC tunnel.

bind interface

Enter this command in dot1q PVC configuration mode.

 

- Create a binding for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the tunnel and not the PVCs within it.

7.

Create one or more 802.1Q PVCs within the tunnel and access dot1q PVC configuration mode.

dot1q pvc or dot1q pvc transport

Enter this command in port configuration mode.


Specify the VLAN ID of the tunnel followed by a colon (:) before you specify the VLAN ID of the PVC.


Use the on-demand keyword to configure a range of PVCs within the tunnel that are created only when needed. (1)(2)

8.

Use Table 3 to set the optional parameters of the 802.Q PVCs.

   

9.

Bind the 802.1Q PVC with one of the following commands. Unless otherwise stated, enter the following commands in link PVC configuration mode:

 

- Create a static binding to an interface.

bind interface

This binding applies to single 802.1Q PVCs with IPoE encapsulation (default)


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the PVC.


You can bind to either an IP interface or a bridged interface. To create bridged 802.1Q PVCs, bind to a bridged interface.

 

- Create a restricted or unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

This binding applies to single PVCs with PPPoE encapsulation


You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.

 

- Create a static binding through a subscriber record to an interface.

bind subscriber

This binding applies to single PVCs with:


  • IPoE encapsulation (default)

  • PPPoE encapsulation


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the PVC.

 

- Automatically create static bindings through subscriber records to interfaces.

bind auto-subscriber

This binding applies to a range of PVCs created using the on-demand keyword and IPoE encapsulation (default)


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the PVC.

 

- Bind the PVC to a bypass for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

This binding applies to single PVCs that are not bound to an interface, subscriber record, or are created on-demand.


Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the PVC and have no child circuits on it.

10.

If you have created a child circuit, bind the child circuit with one of the following commands. Unless otherwise stated, enter the following commands in dot1q child protocol configuration mode:

 

- Create a static binding through a subscriber record to an interface.

bind subscriber

This binding applies only to PPPoE child circuit encapsulation.


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the child circuit.

 

- Create a restricted or unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

This binding applies only to PPPoE child circuit encapsulation.


You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.


Enter this command only if you are not cross-connecting the child circuit.

 

- Bind the PVC to a bypass for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the child circuit.

11.

Disable an 802.1Q PVC (stop operations on it) until you are ready to begin operations on it.

shutdown (PVC)

Enter this command in dot1q PVC configuration mode. By default, all circuits are enabled (operational).

(1)  You can create both static and on-demand 802.1Q PVCs within the same 802.1Q tunnel.

(2)  You cannot configure overlapping transport ranges (with the exception of the fallback transport range [keyword any]) or overlapping circuit creation-on demand (CCOD) ranges. In addition, overlapping transport and CCOD ranges are not allowed.


2.1.5   Create a Circuit Group and Assign Members to It

To create a circuit group and assign members to the group, perform the tasks described in Table 5. It is assumed you have configured 802.1Q PVCs or 802.1Q PVC tunnels (including specifying the use of 802.1Q encapsulation for the Ethernet port) before performing the tasks in Table 5. For details on how to configure 802.1Q PVCs and 802.1Q PVC tunnels, see the Configure an 802.1Q PVC and “Configure an 802.1Q Tunnel and the 802.1Q PVCs Within It sections.

For information on how to create a VPCG, see Configuring VPCGs.

Table 5    Configure a Circuit Group and Assign Members to It

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Create a circuit group and assign a specified name to it.

ip arp

Enter this command in global configuration mode.


For an example of how to attach a QoS metering, policing, or scheduling policy to the circuit group, see Configuring Circuits for QoS.

2.

Select an Ethernet port in which the members of circuit group are to reside, and access port configuration mode.

port ethernet

Enter this command in global configuration mode.

3.

Specify the 802.1Q tunnel or one or more static 802.1Q PVCs which are to be assigned to the specified circuit group and access dot1q PVC configuration mode.

dot1q pvc or dot1q pvc transport

Enter this command in port configuration mode.

4.

Specify that the 802.1Q tunnel or PVCs being configured are members of the specified circuit group.

circuit-group-member

Enter this command in dot1q PVC configuration mode.

2.2   Configuring ATM

This section describes the tasks to configure ATM, specify the card mode for the SAR image, configure an ATM profile, a shaped ATM VP, and an ATM PVC.

2.2.1   ATM Configuration Guidelines

2.2.1.1   ATM Profiles

The following guidelines apply to ATM profiles:

The following guidelines apply to ATM profiles assigned to PVCs:

The following guidelines apply to ATM profiles assigned to shaped VPs:

2.2.1.2   ATM and Congestion Avoidance

The following guidelines apply to the congestion avoidance algorithm that you specify for an ATM profile:

2.2.1.3   ATM Modes and Traffic Shaping

Traffic shaping restrictions for first-generation ATM OC traffic cards include the following:

Traffic shaping restrictions for second-generation ATM OC traffic cards include the following:

Table 6    Traffic Class Combinations for ATM Priority Mode and HSVC Fairness Mode

VP Traffic Class

Valid VC Traffic Classes

CBR

CBR, VBR-rt, VBR-nrt, UBR with PCR option, UBR

VBR-rt

VBR-rt, VBR-nrt, UBR with PCR option, UBR

VBR-nrt

VBR-nrt, UBR with PCR option, UBR

UBR with PCR option

UBR with PCR option, UBR

UBR

UBR

2.2.1.4   ATM and OAM

The following OAM guidelines apply:

2.2.1.5   ATM and QoS

The following QoS guidelines apply:

For information about creating QoS policies CoS queues, see Configuring Queuing and Scheduling.

2.2.1.6   Maximum Number of ATM PVCs and VPs

The maximum combined number of ATM circuits and VPs that the system supports for each ATM port depends on the type of ATM traffic card, the total number of circuits configured on that card, the type and number of traffic classes, the SAR image (mode) that is loaded, the type of QoS policy, the number of CoS queues, and the number of dormant on-demand PVCs that are configured.

The number is also affected by your assignment of VPI and VCI values.

Note:  
The tables in this section list these limits with no on-demand PVCs configured. For limits on the number of PVCs for configurations with on-demand PVCs configured, consult your local technical representative.

The following guidelines apply to the number of shaped VPs and PVCs that the system supports on a traffic card:

Table 7    PVC Limits on First-Generation ATM OC Ports

Traffic Card

PVC Limits for Each Traffic Class per Port

Default Mode

Notes

1-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

8,000

Only the default mode is supported.

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

8,000

Only the default mode is supported.

Table 8 lists the PVC limits for each traffic class on second-generation ATM OC traffic cards.

Table 8    PVC Limits on Second-Generation ATM OC Ports

Traffic Card

PVC Limits for Each Traffic Class per Port

ATM Priority Mode

IP Priority Mode

VC Fairness Mode

HSVC Fairness Mode

Notes

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC (including low-density version)

8,000

8,000

16,000

Not
Applicable

 

8-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

Not
Applicable

Not
Applicable

16,000

16,000

 

2-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

Not
Applicable

Not
Applicable

16,000

16,000

 

You can create a maximum of 256 shaped and unshaped VPs on any ATM port (VPIs 0 to 255); Table 9 lists the limits for shaped VPs on each type of ATM card.

Table 9    Shaped VP Limits for ATM Traffic Cards

Traffic Card

Shaped VP Limits

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

64 per traffic card; 32 per port.

1-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

64 per traffic card.

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC (including low-density version)

Determined by many factors, including the number of PVCs and number of CoS queues created, up to a maximum of 256 shaped VPs on each port.

8-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

Determined by many factors, including the number of PVCs and number of CoS queues created, up to a maximum of 256 shaped VPs on each port.

2-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

Determined by many factors, including the number of PVCs and number of CoS queues created, up to a maximum of 256 shaped VPs on each port.

Table 10 lists the PVC limits on shaped VPs per type of ATM traffic card.

Table 10    PVC Limits on Shaped VPs for ATM Traffic Cards

Traffic Card

VC Limits for Shaped VPs

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

256 per shaped VP; 5,715 per traffic card.

1-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

256 per shaped VP; 5,715 per traffic card.

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC (including low-density version)

16,000 per shaped VP; 16,000 per traffic card.

8-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

16,000 per shaped VP; 32,000 per traffic card.

2-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

16,000 per shaped VP; 32,000 per traffic card.

Table 11 lists the circuit and PVC limits when no ATMWFQ policy is attached.

Table 11    PVC Limits for ATM Cards Without ATMWFQ Policy

Card

Mode

Circuit and PVC Limits

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

Default

8,000 per port; 8,000 per traffic card.

1-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

Default

8,000 per port; 8,000 per traffic card.

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC (including low-density version)

VC fairness


ATM or IP priority

16,000 per port; 16,000 per traffic card.

8-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

VC fairness or HSVC fairness

16,000 per port; 32,000 per traffic card.

2-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

VC fairness or HSVC fairness

16,000 per port; 32,000 per traffic card.

Table 12 lists the circuit and PVC limits for ATM traffic cards with ATMWFQ CoS queues.

Table 12    PVC Limits for ATM Traffic Cards with ATMWFQ CoS Queues

Traffic Card

Mode

Circuit and PVC Limits

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC

VC fairness

  • 0 or 2 CoS queues: 16,000 per port; 16,000 total per MIC.

  • 4 CoS queues: 10,000 per port; 10,000 per MIC.

  • 8 CoS queues: 6,000 per port; 6,000 per MIC.

2-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c MIC

ATM or IP priority

  • 0 or 2 CoS queues: 16,000 per port; 16,000 total per MIC.

  • 4 CoS queues: 10,000 per port; 10,000 per MIC.

  • 8 CoS queues: 6,000 per port; 6,000 per MIC.

8-port ATM OC-3c/STM-1c

VC fairness or HSVC fairness

  • 0 to 2 CoS queues: 16,000 per port; 32,000 per card.

  • 4 CoS queues: 16,000 per port; 32,000 per card.

  • 8 CoS queues: 12,000 per port; 24,000 per card.

2-port ATM OC-12c/STM-4c

VC fairness or HSVC fairness

  • 0 to 2 CoS queues: 16,000 per port; 32,000 per card.

  • 4 CoS queues: 16,000 per port; 32,000 per card.

  • 8 CoS queues: 12,000 per port; 24,000 per card.

2.2.2   Specify the Card Mode for the SAR Image

You must explicitly specify the card mode for the SAR image of a second-generation ATM OC traffic card on which you want to use ATM priority or IP priority traffic scheduling. On cards that support hsvc-fair mode, this must also be explicitly specified. To specify the card mode for the SAR image, perform the task described in Table 13; enter the command in card configuration mode or MIC configuration mode.

Table 13    Specify the Card Mode for the SAR Image

Task

Root Command

Notes

Specify the card mode.

atm mode

This command is available only second-generation ATM OC traffic cards and ATM OC MICs.

2.2.3   Configure an ATM Profile

An ATM profile is required to create ATM PVCs or shaped VPs for ATM PVCs. An ATM profile contains common configuration information that is used by all shaped VPs and ATM PVCs that reference the profile.

Typically, you configure at least one ATM profile for each traffic class that you intend to support on a SmartEdge router. You might also require additional ATM profiles for PVCs with other special requirements, such as counters, or PVCs created on demand.

To configure an ATM profile, perform the tasks described in Table 14.

Table 14    Configure an ATM Profile

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Create a new ATM profile, or to select an existing ATM profile for modification, and access ATM profile configuration mode.

atm profile

Enter this command global configuration mode.

2.

Specify general attributes for the profile. All attributes are optional:

 

Associate a description with an ATM profile.

description (ATM, Frame Relay)

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode.

 

Report the receive and transmit speeds of the ATM PVC to which this profile is assigned.

report

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode.

 

Set the CLP bit in all cells transmitted over PVCs referencing this ATM profile.

clpbit

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode.

 

Specify the traffic class for this ATM profile.

shaping

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode. The default value is UBR without the PCR option.

 

Enable statistics collection for all PVCs referencing this ATM profile.

counters (ATM)

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode.

 

Specify the weighted RED or EPD parameters for congestion avoidance.

congestion

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode.

 

Apply an existing bulkstats schema profile to the profile.

bulkstats schema

 

3.

For non-cross-connected ATM PVCs, enable OAM with one of the following tasks (optional):

 

Enable alarm indication signal (AIS) and remote defect indication (RDI) fault monitoring for any ATM PVC that references this profile and is not cross-connected.

oam fault-monitor

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode. The default value is disabled.

 

Enable the operational state of any ATM PVC that is not cross-connected and that references this profile to be reflected by its AIS and RDI (RDI/AIS) state at the F5 level.

oam manage

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode. The default value is disabled.

4.

For cross-connected ATM PVCs, enable the OAM cells received on one of the ATM PVCs to be forwarded to and transmitted on the other ATM PVC.

oam xc

Enter this command in ATM profile configuration mode. The default value is disabled.

2.2.4   Configure a Shaped ATM VP

When you create an ATM PVC, you must specify a VP for it by using a VPI. An ATM VP can be shaped or nonshaped:

To configure a shaped ATM VP, perform the task described in Table 15; enter this command in ATM OC configuration mode.

Table 15    Configure a Shaped ATM VP

Task

Root Command

Notes

Create or modify a shaped ATM VP.

atm vp

Enter this command in ATM OC configuration mode.

2.2.5   Configure an ATM PVC

To configure an ATM PVC, perform the tasks described in Table 16.

Table 16    Configure an ATM PVC

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Create or modify one or more ATM PVCs, and access ATM PVC configuration mode with one of the following tasks:

 

Create or modify one or more ATM PVCs.

atm pvc

Enter this command in ATM OC configuration mode.


Use the explicit keyword to create a range of static PVCs.


Use the on-demand keyword to configure a range of PVCs that are created only when needed.

 

Assign a different profile to an existing ATM PVC.

atm pvc

You must specify the encapsulation in addition to the new profile name.

2.

Specify general attributes for the PVC (all attributes are optional):

 

Associate a description with an ATM PVC.

description (ATM, Frame Relay)

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode.

 

Enable a watchdog timer for PVCs created on demand.

idle-down

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. This command applies only to ATM PVCs created using the on-demand keyword without multiprotocol encapsulation.

 

Associate the IP address and MAC address of the remote host on the circuit with the ATM PVC.

ip host (PVC)

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. Perform this task only for an ATM PVC that you intend to bind directly to an interface.


You cannot perform this task if you have created the PVC as part of a range of PVCs.

3.

Optional. Create a child circuit on a multiprotocol-encapsulated PVC and access ATM child protocol configuration mode.

circuit protocol

Enter this command only if you have encapsulated the PVC using the multi keyword.

 

Create a binding for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the child circuit.

4.

If you do not intend to cross-connect the ATM PVC to another circuit, bind the ATM PVC with one of the following bind commands:

 

Create a binding for cross-connecting.

bind bypass

Enter this command only if you are cross-connecting the PVC.

 

For an ATM PVC with bridge1483, multi, or route1483 encapsulation, you have three options:

 

Create a static binding to an interface.

bind interface

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. This option is not supported for on-demand ATM PVCs.

 

Create a static binding for a single PVC through a subscriber record to an interface.

bind subscriber

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. This option is supported for a single ATM PVC; an on-demand ATM PVC must be configured with the aaa keyword.

 

Create static bindings for multiple PVCs through subscriber records.

bind auto-subscriber

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. Perform this option only if you are binding a range of PVCs.

 

For an ATM PVC with ppp encapsulation, you have four options:

 

Create an unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode.

 

Create a restricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.

 

Create a static binding for a single PVC through a subscriber record to an interface.

bind subscriber

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. This option is supported for a single ATM PVC; an on-demand ATM PVC must be configured with the aaa keyword.

 

Create static bindings for multiple PVCs through subscriber records.

bind auto-subscriber

Perform this option only if you are binding a range of PVCs.

 

For an ATM PVC with pppoe encapsulation, you have two options:

 

Create an unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode.

 

Create a restricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.

5.

If you have created a child circuit and are not intending to cross-connect it to another circuit, bind the child circuit with one of the following bind commands:

 

Create a static binding through a subscriber record to an interface.

bind subscriber

Enter this command in ATM child protocol configuration mode.

 

Create an unrestricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

Enter this command in ATM child protocol configuration mode.

 

Create a restricted dynamic binding.

bind authentication

Enter this command in ATM child protocol configuration mode.


You must specify the context to create a restricted dynamic binding.

6.

Disable an ATM PVC (stop operations on it) until you are ready to begin operations on it.

shutdown (PVC)

Enter this command in ATM PVC configuration mode. By default, all circuits are enabled (operational).

2.3   Configuring Frame Relay

Note:  
You must enter the encapsulation command in MFR link group, or port configuration mode with the frame-relay keyword before you can enter Frame Relay commands in MFR link group, or port configuration mode.

2.3.1   Configure a Channel or Port for Frame Relay

You can create Frame Relay PVCs on any Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) port, MFR link group, or DS-0 channel group.

The procedure for setting up a POS port is described in the section, Configuring POS Ports. In this procedure, use the encapsulation (POS) command to set the POS port encapsulation to frame-relay. An example of this configuration is found in the section Frame Relay PVC on POS Port.

2.3.2   Configure a Frame Relay Profile

To configure a Frame Relay profile, perform the tasks described in Table 17.

Table 17    Configure a Frame Relay Profile

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Create a new Frame Relay profile, or to select an existing Frame Relay profile for modification, and access Frame Relay profile configuration mode.

frame-relay profile

Enter this command in global configuration mode.

2.

Apply an existing bulkstats schema profile to a Frame Relay profile.

bulkstats schema

 

2.3.3   Configure the Interface Type and LMI Parameters

For Frame Relay to operate, you must configure the interface type and the Frame Relay LMI for the port or channel with Frame Relay encapsulation. To configure the interface type and the LMI, perform the tasks described in Table 18. Enter all commands in MFR link group, or port configuration mode.

Table 18    Configure the Interface Type and LMI Parameters

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Specify the interface type.

frame-relay intf-type

Enter all commands in MFR link group, or port configuration mode.

2.

Specify the interval for the polling verification timer for a DCE interface type.

frame-relay lmi-t392dce

 

3.

Specify the Frame Relay LMI type.

frame-relay lmi-type

 

4.

Enable the automatic detection of the LMI type.

frame-relay auto-detect

This is the default; use the no form to disable automatic detection.

5.

Enable the keepalive function and specify the interval value for a Frame Relay DTE interface.

frame-relay keepalive

The keepalive function is enabled by default with a 10-second interval.

6.

Specify the number of keepalive messages sent before the status message request is sent for a Frame Relay DTE interface.

frame-relay lmi-n391dte

 

7.

Specify the error threshold before LMI is considered to have failed:

 

For a Frame Relay DCE interface.

frame-relay lmi-n392dce

 
 

For a Frame Relay DTE interface.

frame-relay lmi-n392dte

 

8.

Specify the monitored event count:

 

For a Frame Relay DCE interface.

frame-relay lmi-n393dce

 
 

For a Frame Relay DTE interface.

frame-relay lmi-n393dte

 

2.3.4   Configure a Frame Relay PVC

You can configure a Frame Relay PVC on a Packet over SONET/SDH (POS) port that is configured with the encapsulation frame-relay command, MFR link group, or port configuration mode). To configure a Frame Relay PVC, perform the tasks described in Table 19.

Table 19    Configure a Frame Relay PVC

Step

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Create or select a Frame Relay PVC and access Frame Relay PVC configuration mode.

frame-relay pvc

Enter this command in MFR link group, or port configuration mode. You must have previously specified Frame Relay encapsulation for this command to be available.

2.

Associate the IP address of the remote host on the circuit.

ip host (PVC)

Enter this command in Frame Relay PVC configuration mode.

3.

Bind the Frame Relay PVC to an existing interface in an existing context.

bind interface

Enter this command in Frame Relay PVC configuration mode.

4.

Disable a Frame Relay PVC (stop operations on it) until you are ready to begin operations on it.

shutdown (PVC)

By default, all circuits are enabled (operational).

2.4   Circuit Operations

Note:  
The commands listed in this section are common to all circuit types, except where noted.

To monitor, administer, and troubleshoot any circuit, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 20. Enter the clear and debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 20    Circuit Operations

Task

Root Command

Clear the circuit counters for one or more circuits in the system.

clear circuit counters

Enable the generation of debug messages for one or more circuits in the system.

debug circuit

Enable the generation of debug messages that display packets on a circuit in the system.

debug packet

Display circuit information for one or more circuits in the system.

show circuit

Display general counters and counters specific to the circuit type for one or more circuits in the system.

show circuit counters

Display the Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) configuration of the system.

show configuration cfm

Display configuration commands for a circuit type.

show configuration (circuits)

Display a list of circuits for which the generation of debug messages according to the debug circuit command is enabled.

show debug circuit

Note:  
To display the bindings for circuits and the interfaces to which they are bound, enter the show ip interface command in any mode.

2.5   802.1Q PVC Operations

To enable the generation of debug messages for 802.1Q events or to display or clear 802.1Q information, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 21. Enter the clear and debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 21    802.1Q PVC Operations

Task

Root Command

Clear 802.1Q counters.

clear dot1q counters

Enable the generation of debug messages for 802.1Q-related events.

debug dot1q

Display circuit information for one or more 802.1Q tunnels and PVCs in the system.

show dot1q pvc transport

Display counter information for 802.1Q PVCs.

show dot1q counters

Display profile information for one or more 802.1Q profiles in the system.

show dot1q profile

Display a summary for all 802.1Q tunnels and PVCs.

show dot1q pvc transport

2.6   ATM Operations

To enable the generation of debug messages for ATM PVCs or to display or clear ATM information, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 22. Enter the clear and debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 22    ATM Operations

Task

Root Command

Test ATM PVCs by sending OAM loopback cells.

ping atm

Clear traffic counters for one or more ATM PVCs.

clear atm counters

Clear one or more ATM PVCs.

clear atm circuit

Enable the display of operations, administration, and maintenance (OAM) cells for a specific ATM PVC.

debug atm oam

Display cell and SAR packet level counters for configured ATM PVCs.

show atm counters

Display ATM profile information for one or all ATM profiles.

show atm profile

Display static and on-demand ATM PVCs.

show atm pvc

Display on-demand ATM PVCs.

show atm pvc on-demand

Display statistics for configured range of on-demand ATM PVCs.

show atm pvc on-demand range

Display summary information about ATM PVCs and PVCs that are used for OAM.

show atm summary

Display summary information about all shaped ATM VPs.

show atm vp

2.7   CLIPS Operations

To monitor, administer, and troubleshoot CLIPS circuits, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 23. Enter the clear and debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 23    CLIPS Operations

Task

Root Command

Clear CLIPS counters.

clear clips counters

Enable the generation of CLIPS debug messages.

debug clips

Display CLIPS information.

show clips

Display CLIPS group information.

show clips-group

2.8   Frame Relay Operations

To monitor, administer, and troubleshoot Frame Relay features, perform the tasks described in Table 24. Enter the clear and debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 24    Frame Relay Operations

Task

Root Command

Clear all Frame Relay counters for one or more Frame Relay PVCs.

clear frame-relay counters

Clear Frame Relay LMI statistics and error counters.

clear frame-relay lmi-counters

Enable the generation of debug messages for L2VPN-enabled Frame Relay PVCs.

debug frame-relay l2vpn

Enable the generation of debug messages for all LMI packet exchanges with a service provider.

debug frame-relay lmi

Enable the generation of debug messages for Frame Relay LMI packet messages, except those relating to LMI PVC status.

debug frame-relay packet

Display configuration information for configured Frame Relay PVCs.

show frame-relay

Display traffic counters for configured Frame Relay PVCs.

show frame-relay counters

Display Frame Relay LMI configuration information.

show frame-relay lmi-config

Display Frame Relay LMI error counters.

show frame-relay lmi-errors

Display Frame Relay LMI statistics counters.

show frame-relay lmi-stats

Display a list of Frame Relay profiles.

show frame-relay profile

Display the state of configured Frame Relay PVCs, according to the specified keyword.

show frame-relay pvc

2.9   Link Group Operations

To monitor and troubleshoot link groups, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 25. Enter the debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 25    Link Group Operations

Task

Root Command

Enable the generation of debug messages for link group events.

debug lg

Enable the generation of debug messages for MP-related events.

debug ppp multilink

Display link groups, circuits, and bindings.

show link-group

Display LACP links on subscriber-facing Ethernet ports.

show lacp actor

Display the counters for all LACP links on the system.

show lacp counters

Display the LACP link group with a given identification number.

show lacp lg-id

Display LACP information for a link group with the specified name.

show lacp lg-name

Display the partner information for all the LACP circuits or the LACP circuit with a specified circuit handle.

show lacp partner

Display the counters for all LACP links on the system.

show lacp system-id

Display state and statistics information for one or all MP bundles.

show ppp multilink

2.10   PPP and PPPoE Operations

To monitor, administer, and troubleshoot PPP- and PPPoE-encapsulated circuits, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 26. Enter the clear and debug commands in exec mode; enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 26    PPP and PPPoE Operations

Task

Root Command

Clear counters for PPP-encapsulated circuits.

clear ppp counters

Clear counters for PPPoE-encapsulated circuits.

clear pppoe counters

Enable the generation of debug messages for various PPP events on the system.

debug ppp

Enable the generation of debug messages for various PPPoE events on the system.

debug pppoe

Display PPP-encapsulated circuit information.

show ppp

Display counters for PPP-encapsulated circuits.

show ppp counters

Display PPPoE-encapsulated circuit information.

show pppoe

Display counters for PPPoE-encapsulated circuits.

show pppoe counters

2.11   Circuit-Groups Operations

To monitor, administer, and troubleshoot circuit-groups, perform the appropriate task listed in Table 27. Enter the show commands in any mode.

Table 27    Circuit-Groups Operations

Task

Root Command

Display counters for circuit-groups.

show circuit counters circuit-group

Show list of the configured circuit groups or display details pertaining to a specified circuit group.

show circuit-group

Display configuration commands for a circuit type.

show configuration (circuits)

3   Configuration Examples

3.1   802.1Q PVC Examples

This section provides examples of configurations for 802.1Q PVCs, 802.1Q PVC tunnels, and how to create a circuit group and assign members to it.

3.1.1   802.1Q PVCs

The following example binds untagged traffic to an interface, untagged, creates two 802.1Q PVCs on an Ethernet port, and binds them to the interfaces, vlan100 and vlan200:

  1. First, the interfaces are created in the local context:
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface untagged
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.0.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface vlan100
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.1.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface vlan200
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.2.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#exit
  1. Next, the Ethernet port is configured:
[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 5/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#no shutdown
[local]Redback(config-port)#bind interface untagged local
[local]Redback(config-port)#encapsulation dot1q
  1. Finally, the 802.1Q PVCs with VLAN tag values 100 and 200 are configured:
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc 100
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#description local vlan
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#bind interface vlan100 local
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#exit
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc 200
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#bind interface vlan200 local
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#exit

3.1.2   802.1Q PVC Tunnel

The following example is similar to the previous one, but creates static and on-demand 802.1Q PVCs in the 802.1Q tunnel:

  1. Create the interfaces in the local context:
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface untagged
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.0.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface vlan-tunnel
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.4.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface vlan100
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.1.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface vlan200
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip address 15.1.2.1/24
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#exit
  1. Configure the Ethernet port:
[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 5/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#no shutdown
[local]Redback(config-port)#bind interface untagged local
[local]Redback(config-port)#encapsulation dot1q
  1. Create the 802.1Q PVC tunnel:
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q tunnel 9100
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc 50 encapsulation 1qtunnel
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#description 802.1Q tunnel
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#bind interface vlan-tunnel local
  1. Create the static and on-demand 802.1Q PVCs within the tunnel. The static PVC has VLAN tag value 100; the on-demand PVCs have VLAN tag values 1 through 99:
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc 50:100
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#bind interface vlan100 local
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#exit
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc on-demand 50:1 through 99 encapsulation pppoe
[local]Redback(config-port)#bind authentication chap
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#exit
Note:  
The bind interface command is not available for on-demand 802.1Q PVCs.

3.1.3   Creating a Circuit Group and Assigning Members to It

The following example shows how to create a homed circuit group (salesgroup) and attach a previously configured QoS scheduling policy (pwfq1_policy) to this circuit group. This example then shows how to assign 802.1Q PVC tunnels (50 through 60, and 40) as members of the circuit group:

  1. Create a homed circuit group and then attach a QoS scheduling policy to it:
[local]Redback(config)#circuit-group salesgroup port 12/1
[local]Redback(config-circuit-group)#qos policy queuing pwfq1_policy
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#exit
  1. Configure the Ethernet port:
[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 12/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#encapsulation dot1q
  1. Create or access the 802.1Q PVC tunnels and then assign the tunnels as members of the circuit group:
[local]Redback(config-port)#dot1q pvc 50 through 60
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#circuit-group-member salesgroup
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#dot1q pvc 40
[local]Redback(config-dot1q-pvc)#circuit-group-member salesgroup

3.2   ATM Examples

This section provides examples of configuring ATM profiles, ATM VPs, ATM, PVCs, and ATM HSVCs.

3.2.1   ATM Profiles

The following example shows the configuration of the following ATM profiles:

[local]Redback(config)#atm profile vbrnrt-basic
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#shaping vbr-nrt pcr 100000 cdvt 5000 scr 80000 bt 8000
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#exit

[local]Redback(config)#atm profile oam
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#shaping ubr
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#oam manage end-to-end auto-loopback regular-timeout 45 retry-timeout 4 
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#counters l2
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#exit
[local]Redback(config)#atm profile monitor
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#shaping ubr
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#oam fault-monitor end-to-end
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#counters l2
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#exit

[local]Redback(config)#atm profile cbr1
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#shaping cbr rate 100000 cdvt 10
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#oam fault-monitor end-to-end
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#counters l2
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#exit

[local]Redback(config)#atm profile ubr1
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#shaping ubr
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#counters l2
[local]Redback(config-atm-profile)#exit

3.2.2   ATM VPs

The following example shows how to create a shaped ATM VP on an ATM OC port:

[local]Redback(config)#port atm 4/1
[local]Redback(config-atm-oc)#atm vp 100 profile cbr1

3.2.3   ATM PVCs

The following example shows how to create two ATM PVCs, 4 and 110, on an ATM OC port, using the oam and ubr1 profiles on shaped VP 100, and binds them to an existing interface atmpvc in the local context:

!Create VCI 4 on VP 100 for OAM cells
[local]Redback(config)#port atm 3/1
[local]Redback(config-atm-oc)#atm pvc 100 4 profile oam encapsulation bridge1483
!Create the PVC that will be managed with OAM
[local]Redback(config-atm-oc)#atm pvc 100 110 profile monitor encapsulation bridge1483
[local]Redback(config-atm-pvc)#description bridged 1483 PVC
[local]Redback(config-atm-pvc)#bind interface atmpvc local
[local]Redback(config-atm-pvc)#exit

3.3   Frame Relay Examples

3.3.1   Frame Relay PVC on POS Port

The following example shows the configuration of Frame Relay on a POS port, which is bound to an interface, fr4-1, in the local context:

[local]Redback(config)#port pos 4/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#no shutdown 
[local]Redback(config-port)#encapsulation frame-relay
[local]Redback(config-port)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi
[local]Redback(config-port)#frame-relay keepalive 10
[local]Redback(config-port)#frame-relay lmi-n391dte 6
[local]Redback(config-port)#frame-relay lmi-n392dte 3
[local]Redback(config-port)#frame-relay lmi-n393dte 4
[local]Redback(config-port)#frame-relay pvc dlci 16
[local]Redback(config-fr-pvc)#bind interface fr4-1 local 
[local]Redback(config-fr-pvc)#exit