Configuring BFD

Contents

1Overview

2

Configuration and Operations Tasks
2.1Configuring a BFD Neighbor
2.2Configuring BFD on an Interface
2.3Disabling BFD for an IS-IS Interface
2.4Disabling BFD for an OSPF Interface
2.5Disabling BFD for a PIM Interface
2.6Enabling BFD for a Static Route
2.7Enabling FRR Triggered by BFD to the IP Next Hop
2.8Enabling BFD for an eBGP Neighbor
2.9BFD Operations

3

Configuration Examples
3.1BFD Neighbor
3.2BFD Interface
3.3BFD for IS-IS
3.4BFD for OSPF
3.5BFD for Static Routes
3.6BFD for PIM
3.7FRR Triggered by BFD to the IP Next Hop
3.8BFD for eBGP
Copyright

© Ericsson AB 2009 -2011. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List
SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

1   Overview

This document provides an overview of Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) and describes the tasks and commands used to configure, monitor, troubleshoot, and administer BFD features through the SmartEdge® router.

Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) is a simple Hello protocol that, in many respects, is similar to the detection components of some routing protocols. A pair of routers periodically transmit BFD packets over each path between the two routers, and if a system stops receiving BFD packets after a predefined time interval, some component in that particular bidirectional path to the neighboring router is assumed to have failed.

A path is only declared to be operational when two-way communication has been established between systems.

Note:  
Currently, only Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet (GE) ports support BFD communication. For BFD to work properly, the BFD neighbor must be reachable over an Ethernet link. All Ethernet line cards (PPA2 and PPA3) support BFD communication.

BFD provides low-overhead, short-duration detection of failures in the path between adjacent forwarding engines, including the interfaces, data links, and to the extent possible, the forwarding engines themselves.

The legacy Hello mechanism run by routing protocols does not offer detections of less than one second, and for some applications, more than one second is too long and represents a large amount of data loss at gigabit rates. BFD provides the ability to detect communication failures in less than one second.

Note:  
BFD cannot be enabled on bridge, intercontext and loopback interfaces.

2   Configuration and Operations Tasks

Note:  
In this section, the command syntax in the task tables displays only the root command.

To configure BFD, perform the tasks in the sections that follow.

2.1   Configuring a BFD Neighbor

A BFD session is established for each BFD neighbor configured. More than one BFD neighbor can be configured.

To configure a BFD neighbor, perform the tasks described in Table 1. Enter all commands in BFD neighbor configuration mode, unless otherwise noted.

Table 1    Configure a BFD Neighbor

Task

Root Command

Notes

Create a BFD instance and enter BFD router configuration mode.

router bfd

Enter this command in context configuration mode.

Create a new BFD neighbor, or select an existing one for modification, and enter BFD neighbor configuration mode.

neighbor (BFD)

Enter this command in BFD router configuration mode.

Specify the detection multiplier value.

detection-multiplier

The negotiated minimum transmit interval (the minimum desired transmit interval agreed upon by both peers) is multiplied by the detection multiplier value to provide the detection time for the transmitting system in asynchronous mode. The detection time is the time it takes to declare a neighbor as down. For example, if the minimum desired transmit interval was negotiated at 10 ms and the detection multiplier is set to 3, then the detection time is 30 ms. Using the detection multiplier adds robustness to BFD by allowing the system to not bring down a neighbor if only one BFD packet is missed.

Specify the minimum required interval, in milliseconds, between received BFD control packets that the system is capable of supporting.

minimum receive-interval

Specify the minimum desired transmit interval, in milliseconds, used by the local system when transmitting BFD control packets.

minimum transmit-interval

2.2   Configuring BFD on an Interface

Configuring BFD on an interface establishes a separate BFD session for each neighbor on the interface. Neighbors are learned by the client routing protocol (such as Open Shortest Path First [OSPF]) that has BFD detection enabled.

Note:  
BFD clients are routing protocols that use BFD to detect communication failures in less than one second. Currently, BFD supports static routes, RSVP links, external Border Gateway Protocol (eBGP), Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM), Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS), and OSPF.

Note:  
BFD cannot be enabled on bridge, intercontext and loopback interfaces.

To configure BFD on an interface, perform the tasks described in Table 2. Enter all commands in BFD interface configuration mode, unless otherwise noted.

Table 2    Configure BFD on an Interface

Task

Root Command

Notes

Create a BFD instance and enter BFD router configuration mode.

router bfd

Enter this command in context configuration mode.

Enable BFD on a named interface and enters BFD interface configuration mode.

authentication (RIP)

Enter this command in BFD router configuration mode.


The interface must already be configured through the interface command (in context configuration mode) before BFD can be enabled on it. For more information about the interface command, see Configuring Contexts and Interfaces.

Specify the detection multiplier value.

detection-multiplier

The negotiated minimum transmit interval (the minimum desired transmit interval agreed up by both peers) is multiplied by the detection multiplier value to provide the detection time for the transmitting system in asynchronous mode. The detection time is the time it takes to declare a neighbor as down. For example, if the minimum desired transmit interval was negotiated at 10 ms and the detection multiplier is set to 3, then the detection time is 30 ms. Using the detection multiplier adds robustness to BFD by allowing the system to not bring down a neighbor if only one BFD packet is missed.

Specify the minimum required interval, in milliseconds, between received BFD control packets that the system is capable of supporting.

minimum receive-interval

Specify the minimum desired transmit interval, in milliseconds, used by the local system when transmitting BFD control packets.

minimum transmit-interval

2.3   Disabling BFD for an IS-IS Interface

By default, when BFD is enabled for the same interface on which IS-IS has been enabled, BFD is automatically enabled for each neighbor on the interface. To disable BFD for an IS-IS interface, perform the tasks described in Table 3.

Table 3    Disable BFD for an IS-IS Interface

Task

Root Command

Notes

Access IS-IS router configuration mode.

router isis

Enter this command in context configuration mode.

Access IS-IS interface configuration mode.

interface (IS-IS)

Enter this command in IS-IS router configuration mode.


Only one IS-IS instance can be running on an interface.

Disable BFD for an IS-IS interface.

disable-bfd (IS-IS)

Enter this command in IS-IS interface configuration mode.


For more information about IS-IS, see Configuring IS-IS.

2.4   Disabling BFD for an OSPF Interface

By default, when BFD is enabled for the same interface on which OSPF has been enabled, BFD is automatically enabled for each neighbor on the interface. To disable BFD for an OSPF interface, perform the tasks described in Table 4.

Table 4    Disable BFD for an OSPF Interface

Task

Root Command

Notes

Access OSPF router configuration mode.

router ospf

Enter this command in context configuration mode.

Access OSPF area configuration mode.

area

Enter OSPF interface configuration mode.

interface (OSPF)

Disable BFD for an OSPF interface.

disable-bfd (OSPF)

Enter this command in OSPF interface configuration mode.


For more information about OSPF, see Configuring OSPF.

2.5   Disabling BFD for a PIM Interface

By default, BFD is enabled on PIM interfaces and for each neighbor on the interface. To disable BFD for a PIM interface, perform the tasks described in Table 5.

Table 5    Disable BFD for a PIM Interface

Task

Root Command

Notes

Access interface configuration mode for the PIM interface on which you want to disable BFD.

interface (BFD)

Enter this command in context configuration mode.

Disable BFD for the PIM interface.

no pim bfd

For more information about PIM, see Configuring IP Multicast.

2.6   Enabling BFD for a Static Route

By default, BFD is disabled for all static routes, but you can enable BFD for a particular static route. When BFD detects a communication failure to the next hop specified for a static route (that has BFD enabled), the static route is withdrawn.

To enable BFD for a static route, perform the task described in Table 6.

Table 6    Enable BFD for a Static Route

Task

Root Command

Notes

Enable BFD for a static route.

ip route

Enter this command in context configuration mode.


Use the bfd keyword to enable BFD for a static route.


For more information about static routes, see Configuring Basic IP Routing.

2.7   Enabling FRR Triggered by BFD to the IP Next Hop

By default, BFD detection is disabled on RSVP links. You must enable BFD at both the router RSVP level and for any individual neighbor that requires fast reroute (FRR).

Note:  
FRR for RSVP supports single-hop IP BFD only. The SmartEdge router does not support Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) BFD.

Consider the following rules and restrictions when enabling FRR triggered by BFD to the IP next hop:

Note:  
Traffic redistribution is supported only when an LSP is protected.

To enable FRR triggered by BFD to the IP next hop, perform the task described in Table 7.

Table 7    Enable FRR Triggered by BFD to the IP Next Hop

Task

Root Command

First, enable BFD on the RSVP client. Please be aware that BFD does not work if it is not first enabled at RSVP level:

Enter context configuration mode.

context

Enter RSVP router configuration mode.

router rsvp

Enable BFD on the RSVP client.

bfd

Next, enable BFD for a specific next hop neighbor:

Enter context configuration mode.

context

Create a BFD instance and enter BFD router configuration mode.

router bfd

Enable BFD for the next hop neighbor.

interface

Verify the BFD configuration for your RSVP interface.

show rsvp interface

2.8   Enabling BFD for an eBGP Neighbor

By default, BFD is disabled for all eBGP neighbors, but you can enable BFD for a particular eBGP neighbor. When BFD detects a communication failure to the eBGP neighbor, the neighbor is reset.

To enable BFD for an eBGP neighbor, perform the task described in Table 8.

Table 8    Enable BFD for an eBGP Neighbor

Task

Root Command

Notes

Enable BFD for an eBGP neighbor.

bfd (BGP neighbor)

Enter this command in BGP neighbor configuration mode.


BFD can be enabled only for eBGP neighbors; enabling BFD for an internal Border Gateway Protocol (iBGP) neighbor generates an error message.


For more information about BGP, see Configuring BGP.

2.9   BFD Operations

To manage BFD functions, perform the appropriate tasks described in Table 9. Enter the show command in any mode; enter the debug commands in exec mode.

Table 9    BFD Operations Tasks

Task

Root Command

Enable the generation of BFD debug messages.

debug bfd

Enable the generation of BFD debug messages for all Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) instances.

debug ospf bfd

Display active BFD session information for neighbors in the current context.

show bfd session

3   Configuration Examples

The sections that follow provide BFD configuration examples.

3.1   BFD Neighbor

A BFD session is established for each BFD neighbor configured. More than one BFD neighbor can be configured. The following example configures the BFD neighbor, 192.168.0.24, sets the minimum desired transmit interval to 30 ms, sets the minimum receive interval to 30 ms, and the sets detection multiplier to 4:

[local]Redback#configure

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bfd

[local]Redback(config-bfd)#neighbor 192.168.0.24

[local]Redback(config-bfd-nbr)#minimum receive-interval 30

[local]Redback(config-bfd-nbr)#minimum transmit-interval 30

[local]Redback(config-bfd-nbr)#detection-multiplier 4

[local]Redback(config-bfd-nbr)#end

3.2   BFD Interface

Configuring BFD on an interface establishes a separate BFD session for each neighbor on the interface. Neighbors are learned by the client routing protocol (such as OSPF) that has BFD detection enabled. The following example configures BFD on the interface, foo, sets the minimum desired transmit interval to 25 ms, sets the minimum receive interval to 40 ms, and the sets detection multiplier to 2:

[local]Redback#configure

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bfd

[local]Redback(config-bfd)#interface foo

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#minimum receive-interval 25

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#minimum transmit-interval 40

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#detection-multiplier 2

[local]Redback(config-bfd-if)#end

3.3   BFD for IS-IS

By default, when BFD is enabled for the same interface on which IS-IS has been enabled, BFD is automatically enabled for each neighbor on the interface; however, you can disable BFD for the interface. The following example disables BFD for the IS-IS interface isis-foo:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router isis ip-backbone

[local]Redback(config-isis)#interface isis-foo

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#disable-bfd

[local]Redback(config-isis-if)#end

3.4   BFD for OSPF

By default, when BFD is enabled for the same interface on which OSPF has been enabled, BFD is automatically enabled for each neighbor on the interface; however, you can disable BFD for the interface. The following example disables BFD for the OSPF interface ospf-foo:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router ospf 15

[local]Redback(config-ospf)#area 0

[local]Redback(config-ospf-area)#interface ospf-foo

[local]Redback(config-ospf-if)#disable-bfd

[local]Redback(config-ospf-if)#end

3.5   BFD for Static Routes

By default, BFD is disabled for all static routes, but you can enable BFD for a particular static route. The following example enables BFD for the static route to 1.1.1.1/24 with the next hop, 2.2.2.2:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#ip route 1.1.1.1/24 2.2.2.2 bfd

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#end

3.6   BFD for PIM

By default, BFD is enabled for all PIM interfaces. If BFD is enabled on a PIM interface, BFD is automatically enabled for each neighbor on the interface; however, you can disable BFD for the interface. The following example disables BFD for the PIM interface pim1:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface pim1

[local]Redback(config-if)#no pim bfd

[local]Redback(config-if)#end

3.7   FRR Triggered by BFD to the IP Next Hop

By default, BFD is disabled for all RSVP LSPs, but you can enable BFD at both the router RSVP level and for any individual neighbor that requires FRR. The following example shows how to enable FRR triggered by BFD to the IP next hop. In this example, BFD is enabled on the RSVP client and for the next hop on the RSVP interface called rsvp1:

First, enable BFD on the RSVP client. All IP interfaces configured on that RSVP client have BFD enabled:

local]Redback#configure

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router rsvp

[local]Redback(config-rsvp)#bfd

Next, enable BFD for a specific next hop neighbor:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bfd

[local]Redback(config-bfd)#interface rsvp1

3.8   BFD for eBGP

By default, BFD is disabled for all eBGP neighbors, but you can enable BFD for a particular eBGP neighbor. The following example enables BFD for the eBGP neighbor, 8.8.8.2:

[local]Redback(config)#context local

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#router bgp 100

[local]Redback(config-bgp)#neighbor 8.8.8.2 external

[local]Redback(config-ospf-bgp-neighbor)#bfd

[local]Redback(config-ospf-bgp-neighbor)#end