Performing Basic Configuration Tasks

Contents

1Performing Basic Configuration Tasks
1.1About Basic Configuration Tasks
1.2Log On and Initiate the CLI
1.3Navigate the CLI
1.4Manage Database Transactions
1.5Work with Commands
1.6Navigate CLI Output
1.7Exit Command Modes
1.8Display Available Commands, Keywords, and Arguments
1.9Manage Database Transactions
1.10Configure System-Wide Management Features
1.11Process Monitoring
1.12About Basic System Parameters
1.13How to Identify Basic System Identification and Services
1.14Access Global Configuration Mode
1.15Configure the System Identity
1.16Configure Service Options
1.17Configure the System Clock
1.18Configure the TCP Keepalive Parameters
1.19Accessing the CLI
1.20Log On to the Console Port for the First Time
1.21Configure a Local Administrator Account
1.22Secure the Standby Console Port
1.23Configure the Management Port
1.24Configure SSH Remote Access Attributes
1.25Configure Banners
1.26Configure Session Inactivity Timers
Copyright

© Ericsson AB 2009–2011. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List
SmartEdge  is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

1   Performing Basic Configuration Tasks

This document provides an overview of the command line interface (CLI). It describes the tasks used to initiate and navigate the CLI, manage database transactions, collect crash dump data, monitor the system, upload core dump files, configure system identity, set the system clock, and configure of TCP keepalive, administrator account, management port, and console setup.

1.1   About Basic Configuration Tasks

The primary administrator interface to the operating system is the CLI. You access the CLI from the console port or through a remote session (for example, Telnet or Secure Shell [SSH]) to perform all configuration tasks and to monitor the operating system. To access the operating system software and its CLI, use either of the following methods:

If the console port has been secured or if the Ethernet management port has been configured, you are prompted to log on. If the console port has not been secured, you initiate your session by simply pressing Enter. In either case, your session begins in exec mode. To secure the console port and configure the Ethernet management port, see Accessing the CLI.

This section provides information about case sensitivity, partially typed commands and the no and default forms of commands.

1.1.1   Commands and Case-Sensitivity

Keywords in commands are not case-sensitive. For example, the show version command is accepted if entered in any of the following ways: show version, SHOW VERSION, or Show Version.

Arguments are case-sensitive. For example, if you supply Customers for the ctx-name argument in the context ctx-name command, the operating system software does not recognize the name customers as the same context.

1.1.2   Partially Typed Commands

In all modes, the system recognizes and accepts partially typed commands and keywords, provided that you have entered a sufficient text to be unique. For example, rather than typing configure, you can type conf and press Enter to enter configuration mode. However, if you enter the string con, an error is returned, because insufficient characters have been entered to distinguish between the configure command, and the context command.

1.1.3   No and Default Forms of Commands

Many configuration commands support the no keyword. Typing the no keyword in front of a command disables the function, removes a command from the configuration, or sets a command to its default state. For example, to enable the Routing Information Protocol (RIP), enter the router rip command (in context configuration mode). To subsequently disable the RIP process and remove the command from the configuration, enter the no router rip command (in context configuration mode).

Many configuration commands support the default keyword. Typing the default keyword in front of a command returns a parameter or feature to the default state.

1.2   Log On and Initiate the CLI

To initiate a CLI session, you log on to the SmartEdge™ router, either remotely connected to the Ethernet management port or directly connected to the console port; upon successful log on, the CLI is set to exec mode, by default.

Note:  
You must have an administrator account to log on. To configure the initial administrator account in the local context for a new system, see Accessing the CLI; to configure additional administrator accounts in any context, see Configuring Contexts.

To log on to the system using SSH:

To log on to the system using Telnet:

Note:  
The separator character between the admin-name and the ctx-name or ip-address arguments is configurable and can be any of %, -, @, _, \\, #, and /. For information about configuring the separator character, see Command List. The default character is @, which is used throughout this document.

When you connect to the system either directly to the console, or remotely to the management port, the password you enter is not echoed. In addition, passwords are stored in the configuration file in encrypted format.

If you have configured the management port, you can establish a Telnet or SSH session to the system. There are many tools that provide Telnet and SSH access to remote systems. These tools are beyond the scope of this document. In general, you must provide the system name (the hostname configured for the system) or IP address (the IP address configured for the system management port), as well as an administrator name and password.

If you forget a password, you must delete the administrator account and create a new one; there is no way to modify the password for an administrator account.

If you forget all passwords on the system, you must perform the password discovery procedure described in Recovering Passwords.

The operating system provides default settings for local console sessions. You can customize these settings for the duration of the current session. To change the settings, see Performing Basic System Tasks.

After you are logged on to the system, you have access to the CLI, based on the context to which you are logged on and the privilege level of your account.

Note:  
If you are using Telnet to access the system, to enter the Telnet shell (with the Telnet prompt), enter the ^] characters. The se_telnet prompt is displayed.

1.3   Navigate the CLI

To navigate the CLI, perform the tasks described in Table 1.

Table 1    Navigate the CLI

Task

Root Command

Notes

Return the privilege level for the current exec session to the initial privilege level configured for the current administrator account.

disable

When you create the account, the initial privilege level is specified.


Enter this command in exec mode.

Change the current privilege level for an exec session while in exec mode.

enable

You can specify a level up to the level specified for your account.


Enter this command in exec mode.

Return to exec mode while in any configuration mode.

end

Enter this command in any configuration mode.

Terminate the current CLI session while in exec mode.

exit

Enter this command in exec mode.

Move up one level in the configuration mode hierarchy while in a configuration mode; return to exec mode while in global configuration mode.

exit

Enter this command in any configuration mode.

Enter global configuration mode.

configure

Enter this command in exec mode.

Display the current configuration of the SmartEdge router or the contents of a previously saved configuration file on the local file system.

show configuration

Enter this command in any configuration mode

Display the command history for the current session.

show history

Enter this command in any configuration mode

Display outstanding transactions for other administrators or for internal processes.

show transaction

Enter this command in any configuration mode

Enter a configuration mode from another configuration mode.

See Table 7 for the command to enter the mode.

Note:  
Within any configuration mode, you can enter commands that are available at the one level higher than the current configuration mode without first entering the exit command to return to the higher-level configuration mode. For example, within interface configuration mode, you can type any of the commands in that mode and any commands in the context configuration mode—the next highest mode in the hierarchy.

1.4   Manage Database Transactions

Every configuration command that you enter becomes part of a database transaction, which has a transaction ID associated with it. Commands in a transaction are not incorporated into the database until you commit the transaction. To manage database transactions, perform the tasks described in Table 2.

Table 2    Manage Database Transactions

Task

Root Command

Notes

Begin a transaction and enter global configuration mode.

configure

Enter this command in exec mode.

Erase the current transaction and begin a new one.

abort

Enter this command in any configuration mode.

Assign a comment to the current configuration database transaction. The description can only be viewed with the show transaction command.

comment

Enter this command in any configuration mode.


For more information on the show transaction command, see Command List.

Save the current transaction and begin a new one.

commit

Enter this command in any configuration mode.

Save the current transaction, exit the current configuration mode, and return to exec mode.

end

Enter this command in any mode.

Neither save nor delete the current transaction when returning to the next highest level configuration mode; commit the transaction when exiting global configuration mode and returning to exec mode.

exit

Enter this command in any mode.

1.5   Work with Commands

1.5.1   Display Help for a Command

You can access the online Help for the CLI in the following ways:

Table 3 lists these commands; enter either command in any mode.

Table 3    Access Online Help

Task

Root Command

Obtain help for the current command.

?

Obtain help for using the ? command.

help

Note:  
To enter the ? character as part of a command, when it is not a request for online Help, enter the Esc key followed by the ? character.

1.5.2   Recall Previous Command Entries

Table 4 lists two Emacs-style command keyboard sequences that allow you to step through previously entered commands.

Table 4    Recall Previously Entered Commands

Keyboard

Description

Ctrl+p or up arrow

Recalls previous command in the command history

Ctrl+n or down arrow

Recalls next command in the command history

1.5.3   Edit Command Entries

Table 5 lists additional Emacs-style command keyboard sequences.

Table 5    Additional Emacs-Style Keyboard Sequences

Keyboard

Description

Ctrl+f or right arrow

Moves cursor forward one character

Ctrl+b or left arrow

Moves cursor backward one character

Esc+f

Moves cursor forward one word

Esc+b

Moves cursor backward one word

Ctrl+a

Moves cursor to beginning of line

Ctrl+e

Moves cursor to end of line

Ctrl+k

Deletes to end of line

Ctrl+u

Deletes to beginning of line

Ctrl+d

Deletes character

Esc+d

Deletes word

Ctrl+c

Quits editing the current line

Ctrl+l

Refreshes (redraws) the current line

Ctrl+t

Transposes current character with previous

1.5.4   Complete a Command

You can use the Tab key in any mode to complete a command. Partially typing a command name and pressing the Tab key causes the command to be displayed in full to the point where a further choice has to be made.

1.6   Navigate CLI Output

The CLI automatically pages output for console, Telnet, and SSH sessions. The operating system prints “--more--” to indicate the presence of more output. To navigate command output, use the keyboard sequences described in Table 6.

Table 6    Auto-More Keys and Functions

Key

Function

q

Skips all remaining output and returns to the CLI prompt

Enter

Displays one additional line of output

Space

Displays the next page of output

b

Displays the previous page of output

Note:  
You can use the terminal length and terminal width commands (in exec mode) to specify a terminal size to correctly paginate the output. For more information, see Performing Basic System Tasks.

1.7   Exit Command Modes

The following example exits global configuration mode and returns to exec mode:

[local]Redback(config)#exit
[local]Redback#

The following example exits a CLI session:

[local]Redback#exit

The following example exits context configuration mode and returns to exec mode:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#end
[local]Redback#

1.8   Display Available Commands, Keywords, and Arguments

The following output displays the first few commands available for an administrator with a default privilege level of 6 (> prompt):

[local]Redback>?
  bulkstats    Manage bulk statistics collection file
  disable      Drop into disable administrator mode
  enable       Modify command mode privilege
  exit         Exit exec mode
  help         Description of the interactive help system
  modify       Modify condition action for ACL rule
  monitor      Monitor information
  more         Display the contents of a file
  mrinfo       Request multicast router information
  mtrace       Trace reverse multicast path from source to receiver
  no           Disable an interactive option
  ping         Packet Internet Groper Command
  reauthorize  Reauthorize subscriber using RADIUS
  show         Show running system information
  ssh          Execute SSH/SSHD commands
  talk         talk to administrator
  telnet       Telnet to a host
  terminal     Modify terminal settings
  traceroute   Trace route to destination

The following example uses partial help to display all commands (in global configuration mode) that begin with the character sequence cl:

[local]Redback(config)#cl?
  clock    clock-source

The following example uses full help to display the next argument of a partially complete clock command in global configuration mode:

[local]Redback(config)#system clock ?
  summer-time   Configure summer (daylight savings) time
  timezone      Configure time zone

1.9   Manage Database Transactions

This section provides examples for database commit and delete transactions and providing comments for transactions.

1.9.1   Commit Transactions

The following example commits the current database transaction in 60 minutes, and includes the comment, Cfg BGP in local ctx, to help identify the commit:

[local]Redback(config)#commit in 60 Cfg BGP in local ctx

The following example, by another administrator logged on to the current session, displays information about the transaction:

[local]Redback>show transaction
 TID   State             User     Wait      Comment
-------------------------------------------------------------------
 3491  Waiting to Commit admin1   60 min    Cfg BGP in local ctx

For more information on the show transaction command, see the Command List.

1.9.2   Delete Transactions

The following example deletes the current transaction:

[local]Redback(config)#abort

1.9.3   Provide Comments for Transactions

The following example provides a comment for the current transaction:

[local]Redback(config-ctx)#comment Config context local

1.10   Configure System-Wide Management Features

To configure system-wide management features, such as crash dumps, core dumps, and system monitoring, perform the tasks described in Table 7; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 7    Configure System-Wide Management Features

Task

Root Command

Notes

Enable dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) crash dump data collection.

service crash-dump-dram

This is the default condition.

Set the duration of the system monitoring process.

monitor duration

 

Enable the sending of core dump files to a URL using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP).

service upload-coredump

 

1.11   Process Monitoring

The following example sets process management parameters for the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) process, sets the monitor duration, and then enables monitoring of the BGP process:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#monitor duration 3600
[local]Redback(config)#exit
[local]Redback#monitor process bgp

% enter ctrl-C to exit monitor mode, monitor duration(sec): 3600 (00:00:08)

NAME          PID    SPAWN      MEMORY  TIME         %CPU   STATE
rip           12652      1      576K    00:00:00.02  0.00%  run 

1.12   About Basic System Parameters

Basic system parameters identify and locate the system being used, establish basic services, enable software for paid licensed features, set the system clock parameters, set Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) keepalive parameters, and modify command-line interface (CLI) commands for the system.

Certain key features on the SmartEdge router are separately licensed. These features can be selectively enabled and disabled, using the paid license password for a feature. These features include:

1.13   How to Identify Basic System Identification and Services

The following example defines system contact information, hostname, location, and services:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#system contact IS Hotline 1-800-555-1567
[local]Redback(config)#system hostname freebird
[local]freebird(config)#system location Building 3, 2nd Floor, Lab 3
[local]freebird(config)#service multiple-contexts
[local]freebird(config)#service card-auto-reload
[local]freebird(config)#service auto-system-recovery

1.14   Access Global Configuration Mode

To perform any configuration task, you must first access global configuration mode. To access global configuration mode, perform the task in Table 8.

Table 8    Access Global Configuration Mode

Task

Root Command

Notes

Access global configuration mode.

configure

Enter this command in exec mode.

1.15   Configure the System Identity

To configure the system contact, location, Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) address and priority levels, and system hostname, perform the tasks described in Table 9; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 9    Configure the System Identity

Task

Root Command

Notes

Identify the department or person to contact, and how, for information regarding the system.

system contact

 

Query the user before creating a new context.

system confirmations context

 

Specify the system hostname.

system hostname

The default hostname is Redback.

Configure the MAC address that will be used in the LACP packet negotiation with peers.

system lacp mac-address

 

Configure the LACP priority order that will be used in the LACP packet negotiation with peers.

system lacp priority

The default value is 2.

Configure the system location information.

system location

 

1.16   Configure Service Options

When configuring service options, you cannot create a context until you have enabled the multiple context feature; the only context available without this feature is the local context.


 Caution! 
Risk of data loss. If the console port is directly attached to the serial port of a computer running Windows NT or UNIX, the computer might send a break sequence when it reboots. This has the effect of halting the system and entering kernel debug mode. To reduce the risk, do not enable the console-break feature if the workstation attached to the console port is running Windows NT or UNIX.

To configure service options, perform one or more of the tasks described in Table 10; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 10    Configure Service Options

Task

Root Command

Notes

Enable the creation of multiple contexts.

service multiple-contexts

 

Enable the automatic reload of the PPA code on a traffic card if either of its PPAs becomes inoperable.

service card-auto-reload

This command enables automatic reload for all traffic cards.

Enable automatic system recovery when a process halts.

service auto-system-recovery

 

Enable the console break feature.

service console-break

 

Enable an application-layer protocol (FTP, RCP, SCP, SFTP, SSH, Telnet, TFTP). These services are enabled by default on the local context.

service

 

1.17   Configure the System Clock

The system clock is the logical clock running the hardware and software functions of the SmartEdge router, regardless of the source of its timing. The real-time clock is a battery backed-up clock derived from an on-board oscillator that updates the system clock during system reload and other circumstances. For further information on clocks, see the hardware guide for your SmartEdge router.

To configure the system clock, perform the tasks described in Table 11. Enter all commands in global configuration mode, except the clock set command, which is entered in exec mode.

Table 11    Configure the System Clock

#

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Specify the type of timing interface.

system clock-source timing-type

This command is for XCRP4 Controller card only.

2.

Optional. Specify the clock source with one of the following tasks:

   
 

Specify an internal source.

system clock-source

The default value is the active controller card.

 

Specify an external source.

system clock-source external

 

3.

Define one or more time zones, including the one in which the system is located.

system clock timezone

Use the local keyword to identify the zone in which the system is located.

4.

Optional. Enable the system to automatically switch to daylight saving or standard time.

system clock summer-time

 

5.

Set the current time and date.

clock set

Sets both system and real-time clock. Enter this command in exec mode.

1.17.1   How to Enable the System Clock

The following example shows how to specify system clock settings; the SmartEdge router has XCRP4 Controller card installed and the external source is a synchronization supply unit (SSU) with an E1 interface:

[local]Redback(config)#system clock-source timing-type sdh
[local]Redback(config)#system clock-source external primary framing crc4

1.18   Configure the TCP Keepalive Parameters

To modify the TCP keepalive parameters, perform the task described in Table 12; enter the command in global configuration mode.

Table 12    Configure TCP Keepalive Parameters

Task

Root Command

Optional. Modify the following TCP keepalive parameters as needed by your configuration:


  • Maximum number of times the SmartEdge router tries to reestablish a dropped connection.

  • Amount of time that the SmartEdge router allows a TCP connection to remain open.

  • Amount of time that the SmartEdge router keeps an idle connection open before disconnecting it.

tcp keepalive

1.19   Accessing the CLI

You can access the operating system software and its command line-interface (CLI) using either of the following methods:

Remote access through the Ethernet management port is disabled by default.

Remote access enables remote file operations, such as downloading and uploading files from and to a remote server, with utilities such as File Transfer Protocol (FTP), Secure Shell FTP (SFTP), Trivial FTP (TFTP), and others.

Note:  
In the following descriptions, the term controller card applies to the Cross-Connect Route Processor (XCRP4) Controller card, including the controller carrier card unless otherwise noted.

The term controller carrier card refers to the controller functions on the carrier card within the SmartEdge 100 chassis. The term I/O carrier card refers to the traffic card functions on the carrier card; these functions are compatible with the similar functions that are implemented on the traffic card that are supported on all other SmartEdge routers.


1.20   Log On to the Console Port for the First Time

You can connect a terminal to this port, either directly or through a terminal server; see the appropriate hardware guide for your system for information about connecting and configuring a terminal for use with the console port.

Before you configure the system, the console is not secure; to initiate a session, simply press Enter.

1.21   Configure a Local Administrator Account

To secure the local console and enable remote access, you must configure at least one administrator account on the system. For a newly installed system with only the local context available, you configure an administrator account in the local context. For information about administrator accounts configured in any context, see Configuring Contexts.

To configure an administrator account, perform the tasks described in Table 13.

Table 13    Configure an Administrator Account

#

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Access context configuration mode.

context

Enter this command in global configuration mode.


Specify local as the context.

2.

Create an administrator logon account, secure the console port, enable remote access to the system, and access administrator configuration mode.

administrator

Enter this command in content configuration mode.

3.

Specify general attributes for the account; enter these commands in administrator configuration mode (all attributes are optional):

   
 

Assign a full name or textual description for the administrator.

full-name

 
 

Specify the initial privilege level for exec sessions initiated by an administrator.

privilege start

The default value is 6; specify a setting of 10 to allow the local administrator to enter configuration commands without needing to enter the enable command (in exec mode).

 

Specify the maximum privilege level for an administrator.

privilege max

The default value is 15, which is suitable for the local administrator.

 

Specify public key authentication for an administrator accessing the operating system CLI through SSH.

public-key

 

1.21.1   How to Configure an Administrator Account

The following example displays the creation of an administrator account with the administrator name super and the password icandoanything. Because this account is created in the local context, this administrator is able to view and modify the entire system configuration, and view all running information on the system. When the administrator logs on to the system, the initial privilege level is 10. The administrator can modify the privilege level up to the maximum of 15:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#administrator super password icandoanything
[local]Redback(config-administrator)#full-name "Fred P. Lynch x.1234"
[local]Redback(config-administrator)#privilege start 10
[local]Redback(config-administrator)#privilege max 15
[local]Redback(config-administrator)#enable password 
pwd_for_priv_level_15
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#

Because this account is created in the local context, this administrator is able to view and modify the entire system configuration and view all running information on the system.

The next time the administrator super logs on to the system with the icandoanything password, the administrator is at privilege level 10. To enter privilege level 15, the administrator needs to issue the following commands with the password chosen to enter privilege 15 (in this example, the chosen administrator password is pwd_for_priv_level_15). This password will not be displayed at the CLI:

[local]Redback>enable
Password <enter the password, pwd_for_priv_level_15>
[local]Redback#

1.22   Secure the Standby Console Port

On systems equipped with two controller cards, the standby console port on the standby controller card is labeled Craft 2. You can connect a terminal to this port, either directly or through a terminal server.

Before you configure the system, the standby console port is not secure. To initiate a session, you simply press Enter.

To secure the standby console port, use the same commands that you use to configure an administrator account on the active console port; see Configure a Local Administrator Account.

1.23   Configure the Management Port

The management port is the 10/100 Ethernet port located on the controller card and is designated for system management. The management port is usually configured in the local context.

Note:  
Only the management port on the active controller card is enabled. By default, when the system is powered on or reloaded, the active controller card is in slot 6 in the SmartEdge 400 chassis and slot 7 in the SmartEdge 600, SmartEdge 800, SmartEdge 1200, and SmartEdge 1200H chassis.

To configure the management port, perform the tasks described in Table 14.

Table 14    Configure the Management Port

#

Task

Root Command

Notes

1.

Access context configuration mode.

context

Enter this command in global configuration mode.


Specify local as the context.

2.

Create an interface for the management port and access interface configuration mode.

interface

Enter this command in context configuration mode.

3.

Assign an IP address to the interface.

ip address

Enter this command in interface configuration mode.

4.

Select the management port and access port configuration mode.

port ethernet

Enter this command in global configuration mode.

The Ethernet management port is port 1 on a controller card. The slot number is 6 in a SmartEdge 400 chassis and slot 7 in a SmartEdge 800 chassis.

For a description of this command, see Configuring ATM, Ethernet, and POS Ports.

5.

Bind the management port to the interface created in step 2.

bind interface

For a description of this command, see Configuring Bindings.

6.

Disable the port.

shutdown

Use the no form to enable the port.

Note:  
If the system has dual controller cards installed, it is sufficient to configure the Ethernet management port on the controller card in slot 6 or 7, depending on the chassis. Access to the system is switched to the standby controller card if it should become the active controller card during normal operations.

1.23.1   How to Configure a Management Port

The following example configures the management port on the controller card in slot 7:

[local]Redback#configure
!Create the interface in the local context and assign an IP address
[local]Redback(config)#context local
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface mgmt
[local]Redback(config-if)#ip address 192.168.110.1 255.255.255.0
[local]Redback(config-if)#exit

!Configure the management port
[local]Redback(config)#port ethernet 7/1
[local]Redback(config-port)#bind interface mgmt local
[local]Redback(config-port)#no shutdown
[local]Redback(config-port)#end

1.24   Configure SSH Remote Access Attributes

The operating system software supports SSH and Telnet access to the CLI.

Remote access to the CLI using SSH is similar to remote access using Telnet, in that administrators use the same administrator name and password stored in the operating system configuration file, in Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS), or in Terminal Access Controller Access Control System Plus (TACACS+). The difference is that with SSH, the interactive session is encrypted with the single DES encryption algorithm.

You must complete the tasks described in Table 14 before you configure the SSH attributes. SSH is enabled by default on the local context.

To configure the global SSH attributes, perform one or more of the tasks described in Table 15; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 15    Configure SSH Attributes

Task

Root Command

Notes

Specify the maximum number of concurrent SSH sessions on the system.

ssh server full-drop

The operating system supports up to 32 concurrent administrative sessions (Telnet and SSH) plus one connection to the console port.

Specify the number of concurrent sessions after which the system starts dropping SSH connection requests.

ssh server start-drop

 

Specify the rate at which the system drops SSH connection requests after the start-drop value has been reached.

ssh server rate-drop

 
Note:  
The preceding task table configures the global attributes of remote administrative sessions. The number of authenticated administrative sessions in any context is also configurable. For more information about specifying the maximum number of authenticated administrative sessions in a context, see the Command List.

1.24.1   How to Access the System Using Telnet

You can use many different tools to provide Telnet access to the system. The following example initiates a Telnet session to the system with hostname Host from a UNIX system. The administrator super types in the icandoanything password to log on; the password is not echoed by the operating system:

unix>telnet Host
Connected to Redback.

Escape character is ‘^]’.

Username:super@local
Password:
[local]Redback#
.
.
[local]Redback#exit

1.25   Configure Banners

To configure banners to display different types of messages seen by administrators and subscribers, perform one or more of the tasks described in Table 16; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 16    Configure Banners

Task

Root Command

Notes

Create a message that displays after a user logs on to the system.

banner exec

 

Create a message of the day (MOTD) that displays on all connected systems before the login prompt.

banner motd

The message displays only for Telnet and SSH sessions.

Create a message that displays on all connected systems after the login prompt.

banner login

The message displays only for Telnet and SSH sessions.

1.25.1   How to Configure System Banners

The following example configures the system banners:

[local]Redback#configure
[local]Redback(config)#banner motd /Warning - System going down at 0400./
[local]Redback(config)#banner exec /Welcome to the system/

1.26   Configure Session Inactivity Timers

To configure session inactivity timers, perform one or more of the tasks described in Table 17; enter all commands in global configuration mode.

Table 17    Configure Session Inactivity Timers

Task

Root Command

Set the amount of time the system waits before timing out during a logon attempt.

timeout login

Set the amount of time before a CLI session times out.

timeout session