Configuring Port Pseudowire Connections

Contents

1Overview

2

Configuration Tasks
2.1Prerequisites
2.2Set Up a Port PW

3

Operations Tasks
3.1Verifying and Managing Port Pseudowire Connections
3.2Troubleshooting Port PW Connections

4

Configuration Examples

5

Operations Examples
Copyright

© Ericsson AB 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use of this document.

Trademark List
SmartEdge is a registered trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
NetOp is a trademark of Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

1   Overview

MPLS port pseudowires (PWs) provide point-to-point (P2P) connections between pairs of provider edge (PE) routers, enabling you to connect, route, and forward layer 2 (L2) networks to layer 3 (L3) networks. Like physical Ethernet ports in the SmartEdge® router, port PWs (containing untagged Ethernet circuits) can be bound to IP interfaces in the local context or a VPN context (one port PW to an interface). You can view and configure SmartEdge OS port PWs in much the same way as physical ports.

Note:  
Port PW connections are only supported on PPA2 and PPA3 line cards.

In a typical deployment, port PW connections are used to transport fixed IP traffic from the ingress L2PE device (PE2) to the egress L3PE router (PE1) as in the following diagram:

Figure 1   Typical PW Port Deployment

In this deployment, CPE1 and CPE2 are devices in the broadband access or other network topologies behind the L2PE node. Traffic from CPE1 and CPE2 is forwarded by PE2 through the port PW to PE1, where it is routed and forwarded into the L3 IP/MPLS network and the Internet.

The port PW is configured on PE1, leading to its peer, PE2, through the access MPLS cloud. The port PW interface and routing connect CPE devices behind the L2 PE to the Internet backbone or another L3 network.

PE2 is configured with an L2VPN Ethernet PW to PE1 that simply forwards L2 packets from the attachment circuit into the L2VPN PW, and back.

2   Configuration Tasks

This section describes how to configure port PW connections.

If PE2 is your router, configure L2VPN on it; see Configuring L2VPN.

2.1   Prerequisites

Port PWs operate over an underlying MPLS network with static routing or an IGP (OSPF, or IS-IS). Configure the following prerequisite components:

2.1.1   Configuring an IGP

Before you configure a port PW, you must configure one of these IGPs; see the following documents:

2.1.2   Configuring MPLS

  1. Configure the access MPLS network; for information on configuring MPLS, see Configuring MPLS.
  2. Configure LDP or RSVP signalling; see the following documents:
  3. Configure an LDP targeted neighbor session, required for PW connection; see Configuring LDP.

2.2   Set Up a Port PW

Configure the following components for each port PW:

2.2.1   Configuring the L2VPN Profile

Configure an L2VPN profile with the following steps:

  1. Enter the l2vpn profile command in global configuration mode, and enter L2VPN profile configuration mode.
  2. Add the peer to be connected by the port PW using the peer command.

2.2.2   Configuring a Port PW

To configure a port PW perform the the following steps:

  1. Enter the port pseudowire command in global configuration mode (and enter port configuration mode).

    By default, the port has Ethernet encapsulation.

  2. Enter the no shutdown command.
  3. Assign a VC ID and L2VPN profile to the port PW, using the Commands: t through zvc-id profile prof-name command.

    The value of the vc-id variable must be unique per router.

  4. Optional. Assign other port PW details with the following commands:
    • Assign a description with the description command.
    • Assign a MAC address with the mac-address command.
    • Assign the maximum transmission unit for packets in the port PW with the mtu command.

2.2.3   Binding an Interface to the Port PW

When an interface is bound to a port PW, the SmartEdge OS treats it as an interface bound to a regular physical Ethernet port. It adds the routes to the routing table and detects that the next-hop is on the port PW by checking the port PW circuit that is bound to the interface.

You can bind a port PW to an interface in the local context or any VPN context.

For more information about creating interfaces, see Configuring Contexts and Interfaces.

  1. For each port PW connection, create an interface leading to the L2 network; for example as in the diagram, 10.10.10.1/24.
  2. Bind the port PW to the IP interface leading to the L2 network with the bind interface int-name ctx-name command.

There are two ways you can configure IPoE customers over a port PW connection:

2.2.4   Configuring IP Routing Over the Port PW

Port PW connections currently support static routing, RIP, and BGP protocols. By enabling routing on port PWs, enterprise, L3VPN, and other networking services are delivered using port PWs to customers connected to the L2VPN network.

Configure one of the following routing protocols:

For L3VPN services, routing on a port PW interface in a VPN context emulates a PE-CE connection.

3   Operations Tasks

This section describes the commands used to verify, manage, and troubleshoot port PW connections.

3.1   Verifying and Managing Port Pseudowire Connections

Use the following commands to verify that a port PW connection is up and passing traffic (see Figure 1 for the components named).

  1. To check the status of port PW connections, examine log messages for port PW UP and DOWN messages.
  2. To list the port PWs on the router, use the show port pseudowire command. Add the pw-name variable to show basic information about one specified port PW. You can add the counters keyword to display counters for the port PW.

    Alternatively, you can add the detail keyword for detailed information; the output displays the circuit handle, operational status, line state, administrative state, encapsulation type, MTU size, and MAC address for the port PW).

  3. To verify the status of the port PW, use the show port pseudowire command for Ethernet port status or the show mpls port pseudowire command for MPLS details.
  4. To verify IP connectivity with a device behind the L2 network, use the ping command; for example, to verify the connection from PE1 to CPE1, enter the ping 10.10.10.2/24 command on PE1.
  5. To verify traffic flow, use the show circuit counters port-pseudowire command with the pw-name argument or the live, or detail keywords.
  6. To verify connected routes, use the show arp-cache command or the show ip route command with the detail or next-hop keywords.

3.2   Troubleshooting Port PW Connections

  1. To check MPLS signalling, use one of the following commands:
  2. To check port PW neighbors, use the show ldp neighbor detail command.
  3. If there is a problem with BGP peering between PE1 and one of the CPEs, check BGP functions with the following commands:
  4. If there is a problem with RIP peering between PE1 and one of the CPEs, check RIP functions with the following commands:
  5. To investigate the L3VPN side, use the following commands:
  6. To investigate the L2PE node, use the following commands:
  7. To investigate the CPEs behind the L2 network, use the following commands:

4   Configuration Examples

This section provides examples of configuring the port PW components and the complete configuration of the node, PE1.

The first example shows how to configure an L2VPN profile, l2_profile_CPE1 (in global configuration mode), which associates PW ports with the peer 192.168.168.2 and enters L2VPN profile configuration mode. This example assumes that the underlying MPLS network and IGP are already configured; see the complete configuration for PE1 below.

[local]Redback(config)#l2vpn profile l2_profile_CPE1 
 [local]Redback(config-l2vpn-xc-profile)#peer 192.168.168.2 

The following example in the l3vpn-1 context configures the to-CPE1 interface to be used by the port PW.

For a diagram of the connections, see Figure 1.

[local]Redback(config)#context l3vpn-1
[local]Redback(config-ctx)#interface to-CPE1
[local]Redback(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1/24

The following example configures the port PW in global configuration mode (and enters port configuration mode), adds an optional description, configures the port PW to be in the Up state, binds it to the previously configured interface, assigns a VC-ID and associates it with the previously configured L2VPN profile.

[local]Redback(config)#port pseudowire l2-net
[local]Redback(config-port)#description Connects to the L2 network of CPE1.
[local]Redback(config-port)#no shutdown
[local]Redback(config-port)#bind interface to-CPE1 l3vpn-1
[local]Redback(config-port)#vc-id 100 profile l2_profile_CPE1

The following example shows these configurations in the end-to-end configuration of the node, PE1 in Figure 1. Although in this example the port PW is bound to a VPN context, they can be bound to any interface leading to the l2 network.

service multiple-contexts
!
! 
!
!
! l2vpn profile configuration 
l2vpn profile l2_profile_CPE1 
  peer 192.168.168.2 
!

context local
! 
 no ip domain-lookup
!
router-id 192.168.168.1
!
 interface loopback loopback
  ip address 192.168.168.1/32
!
 interface mgmt
  ip address 10.18.20.116/24
!
 interface to-MPLS-BACKBONE
  ip address 172.172.200.1/24
!
 interface to-PE2
  ip address 172.172.100.1/24
 logging console
!
 router ospf 1
  fast-convergence
  area 0.0.0.0
   interface to-MPLS-BACKBONE
   interface to-PE2
   interface loopback
!
 router mpls
  interface to-MPLS-BACKBONE
  interface to-PE2
  interface loopback
!
 router ldp
  neighbor 192.168.168.2 targeted
  interface to-MPLS-BACKBONE
  interface to-PE2
  interface loopback
!
 router bgp 65535
!
  neighbor 192.168.168.3 internal
    update-source loopback
   address-family ipv4 unicast
   address-family ipv4 vpn

context l3vpn-1 vpn-rd 65535:1
! 
 no ip domain-lookup
!
 interface to-CPE1
  ip address 10.10.10.1/24
 no logging console
!
 router bgp vpn
  address-family ipv4 unicast
   export route-target 65535:1
   import route-target 65535:1
   redistribute connected
!
!
card ge4-20-port 9
!
port ethernet 9/4 
 no shutdown
 bind interface to-MPLS-BACKBONE local
!
card 10ge-4-port 10
!
port ethernet 10/2 
 no shutdown
 bind interface to-PE2 local
!
 !
port pseudowire l2-net
 description connects to l2 network of CPE1
 no shutdown
  bind interface to-CPE1 l3vpn-1
 vc-id 100 profile l2_profile_CPE1
! 
 system hostname PE1
! 
 boot configuration /flash/admin.cfg
 no timeout session idle
!

The following example shows how to configure three port PWs (with multicast enabled) on the interfaces to which they are bound (pwif1 and pwif2 in the local context and pwif3 in the ctx2 context). It also shows how to enable multicast (and IGMP) on a subscriber interface leading to a multicast source:

!
!
!
!
!
service multiple-contexts
!
!
!
!
! l2vpn profile configuration
l2vpn profile prof1
  peer 1.1.1.1
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
context local
!
!
 interface lo1 loopback
  ip address 2.2.2.2/32
!
 interface mgmt
  ip address 172.31.23.121/24
!
 interface pwif1<<<<<<< port PW pw1 bound to this interface.
  ip address 10.1.1.2/24
  pim sparse-mode<<<<<<< PIM-SM enabled for this interface.
!
 interface pwif2<<<<<<< port PW pw2 bound to this interface.
  ip address 10.1.2.2/24
  pim sparse-mode<<<<<<< PIM-SM enabled for this interface.
!
 interface to-dev1
  ip address 20.1.1.2/24
!
 interface to-dst
  ip address 30.1.1.1/24
  pim sparse-mode
 logging console
!
 router ospf 1
  fast-convergence
  area 0.0.0.1
   interface lo1
   interface to-dev1
!
!
 router rip rip01
  redistribute connected
  interface pwif1
  interface pwif2
  interface to-dst
!
 router mpls
  interface to-dev1
!
 router ldp
  interface lo1
  interface to-dev1
!
!
!
!
context ctx2
!
!
 interface host loopback
  ip address 30.30.30.30/32
  igmp join-group 224.1.1.1
  pim sparse-mode passive
!
 interface pwif3<<<<<<< port PW pw3 bound to this interface.
  ip address 10.1.3.2/24
  pim sparse-mode<<<<<<< PIM-SM enabled for this interface.
 no logging console
!
 router rip rip02
  redistribute connected
  interface pwif3
  interface host
!
!
!
!
! ** End Context **
!
!
!
!
!
!
card ge-20-port 2
!
port ethernet 2/11
 no shutdown
 bind interface to-dst local
!
card ge-10-port 3
!
port ethernet 3/10
 no shutdown
 bind interface to-dev1 local
!
!
!
 !
port pseudowire pw1
 no shutdown
   bind interface pwif1 local
 vc-id 100 profile prof1
 !
port pseudowire pw2
 no shutdown
   bind interface pwif2 local
 vc-id 200 profile prof1
 !
port pseudowire pw3
 no shutdown
   bind interface pwif3 ctx2
 vc-id 300 profile prof1

5   Operations Examples

This section shows how to verify the port PW.

The following example confirms that OSPF is up between PE1 and PE2:

[local]PE1#show ospf neighbor 

  --- OSPF Neighbors for Instance 1/Router ID 192.168.168.1 ---

NeighborID      NeighborAddress Pri State    DR-State IntfAddress     TimeLeft
192.168.168.2   172.172.100.2   1   Full     DR       172.172.100.1   37
192.168.168.3   172.172.200.2   1   Full     DR       172.172.200.1   32


[local]PE1#show ldp neighbor 
PeerFlags: A - LocalActiveOpen, D - Deleted, R - Reseting, E - OpenExtraDelay
           N - OpenNoDelay, P - SetMD5Passwd, T - RetainRoute, F - FlushState
           X - ExplicitNullEnabled, C - ExplicitNullStatusChanging
           G - Graceful Restart Supported, L - Session Life Extended
           V - Reachable Via RSVP-TE LSP
SHld - Session Holdtime Left, HHld - Hello Holdtime Left

NeighborAddr    LDP Identifier        State   Flag SHld HHld Interface
192.168.168.2   192.168.168.2:0       Oper    G    80   12   to-PE2
                                                        35   none - remote
192.168.168.3   192.168.168.3:0       Oper    G    66   10   to-MPLS-BACKBONE

The following example confirms that the LDP neighbors are UP between PE1 and PE2:

[local]PE1#show ldp neighbor 
PeerFlags: A - LocalActiveOpen, D - Deleted, R - Reseting, E - OpenExtraDelay
           N - OpenNoDelay, P - SetMD5Passwd, T - RetainRoute, F - FlushState
           X - ExplicitNullEnabled, C - ExplicitNullStatusChanging
           G - Graceful Restart Supported, L - Session Life Extended
           V - Reachable Via RSVP-TE LSP
SHld - Session Holdtime Left, HHld - Hello Holdtime Left

NeighborAddr    LDP Identifier        State   Flag SHld HHld Interface
192.168.168.2   192.168.168.2:0       Oper    G    80   12   to-PE2
                                                        35   none - remote
192.168.168.3   192.168.168.3:0       Oper    G    66   10   to-MPLS-BACKBONE

The following examples confirm that the port PW l2-net is UP:

[local]PE1#show port pseudowire 
Name                             CCT                  State
l2-net                           255/25:1:1/1/0/9     Up  

[local]PE1#show port pseudowire detail 

l2-net 255/25:1:1/1/0/9 state is Up  
Description                : connects to l2 network of CPE1

Line state                 : Up  
Admin state                : Up
Encapsulation              : ethernet
MTU size                   : 1500 Bytes
MAC address                : 00:30:88:02:52:3d


[local]PE1#show mpls port pseudowire detail 

Name            : l2-net           
Oper State      : Up               Admin State      : Enable              
Peer            : 192.168.168.2    VC ID            : 100
Current State   : UP               Prev State       : DOWN                
Last Event      : XC_UP            Event Flags      : 0x0000012f
L0 CCT          : 255/25:1:1/1/0/9 
L1 CCT          : 255/25:1:1/1/1/10 
PW in label     : 131072           PW out label     : 131072              
PW local MTU    : 1500             PW remote MTU    : 1500                
Profile name    : l2_profile_CPE1  Context          : Local
Local VC Type   : Ethernet         Remote VC Type   : Ethernet
LSP Configured  :                  LSP Used         :             

The following example confirms that the IP interface is in the UP state for the port-PW:

[local]PE1#context l3vpn-1
[l3vpn-1]PE1#show ip interface brief

Fri Nov 19 21:25:16 2010
Name              Address                   MTU   State    Bindings
to-CPE1           10.10.10.1/24             1500  Up       ethernet PORT PW 0
[l3vpn-1]PE1#

The following example confirms that ARP is UP for the l2-net port PW:

[l3vpn-1]PE1#show arp-cache 
Total number of arp entries in cache: 2
  Resolved entry   : 2
  Incomplete entry : 0

Host              Hardware address    Ttl    Type  Circuit            
10.10.10.1        00:30:88:02:52:3d   -      ARPA  PORT PW 0          
10.10.10.2        00:30:88:14:3d:94   2793   ARPA  PORT PW 0      

The following example pings a remote CPE through the l2-net port PW:

[l3vpn-1]PE1#ping 10.10.10.2
PING 10.10.10.2 (10.10.10.2): source 10.10.10.1, 36 data bytes,
timeout is 1 second
!!!!!

----10.10.10.2 PING Statistics----
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0.0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 1.716/1.892/2.142/0.160 ms
[l3vpn-1]PE1#